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For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 




Jibe U^iVef si% 
of f(?e South'^ 

SEWANEE, TENNESSEE 



Announcements 
For 1964-65 



CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 

Inquiries should be addressed as follows: 

The Director of Admissions. 

Admission to the College; scholarships and financial aid; 
catalogues. 

The Dean of the School of Theology. 

All matters pertaining to the School of Theology, including 
admission of students, scholarships, housing, curriculum, and 
faculty appointments. 

The Dean of the College. 

Academic regulations; curriculum; faculty appointments. 

The Dean of Men. 

Student counseling; class attendance; student conduct; stu- 
dent housing; military service; placement of graduates. 

The Registrar. 

Transcripts and academic records. 

The Treasurer. 

Payment of bills. 

The Alumni Director, 

Alumni Associations; Public Relations; History of the Uni- 
versity. 

The Provost. 

Financial matters; physical equipment; employment of per- 
sonnel; medals and prizes. 

The Vice-Changellor. 

General Administrative Affairs. 



The Bulletin of the University of the South, Volimie 58, 1964, Number 3. This 
Bulletin is published quarterly in February, May, August, and November by 
The University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. Second-class postage paid at 
Sewanee, Tenn. 



oPuUetin of 



The University of the South 



Annual Catalogue 1963-64 




A-nnouncements for Session of 1964-65 




The University of the South is located at Sewanee, Ten- 
nessee, two thousand feet above sea level, on a ten-thousand- 
acre campus on the Cumberland Plateau. 

The enrollment in the College of Arts and Sciences is strictly 
limited, thus enabling the College to provide small classes and 
an intimate, personal relation between student and professor. 

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Forestry de- 
grees are granted by the College. Courses are offered which 
provide basic training for business, for forestry, and for ad- 
vanced work in numerous fields, including journalism, law, 
medicine, teaching, and theology. 

The University of the South is a charter member of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Credits from 
the University are accepted by all institutions of higher learning 
in this country and abroad. 

The Honor Code is a cherished tradition among students 
and faculty. There is a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa in the 
University, among other honor and service fraternities. Ten 
national social fraternities maintain chapters at Sewanee. 

The University has a nationally known program of non-sub- 
sidized athletics. Varsity sports include football, cross country, 
basketball, baseball, golf, tennis, swimming, wrestling, and 
track, in addition to an organized intramural program In these 
and other sports. The University Choir provides training In 
music. Work in dramatics Is carried on, with productions 
throughout the year. Students publish a school paper, a year- 
book, a handbook, and a literary magazine. 






CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Calendar 4-6 

The University — History and Objectives 7-1 1 

University Domain and Buildings 12-16 

Officers of Instruction 17-23 

Officers of Administration 24-28 

University Standing Committees 29 

University Senate 30 

General Information 3 1-40 

College of Arts and Sciences 41-95 

School of Theology 96-123 

Summer Institute of Science and Mathematics 125-130 

Scholarships: College of Arts and Sciences 131-144 

Scholarships : School of Theology 144-15 1 

Medals and Prizes 151-153 

Register of Students 155-182 

Board of Regents 183 

Board of Trustees 184-185 

Associated Alumni 186 

Commencement, 1963 187-192 

Index 193-196 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1964-65 



College of Arts and Sciences 
Summer Term 

T964 

June 21, Sunday Dormitories open. 

June 22, Monday Registration 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. 

June 23, Tuesday Classes meet at 8:00 a.m. 

July 4, Saturday Holiday. 

August 12, Wednesday Last day of classes. 

August 13, Thursday Summer School examinations begin. 

August 15, Saturday Summer School examinations end. 

First Semester 

September 13, Sunday Orientation program for new students begins at 

6:30 p.m. 

Dining hall open for students at evening meal. 
September 15, Tuesday Registration of new students, 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. 

Registration of old students, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. 
September 16, Wednesday Registration of old students, 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. 

Opening Convocation at 12:10 p.m. 

September 17, Thursday Classes meet at 8:00 a.m. 

October 10, Saturday Founders' Day. 

October 24, Saturday Homecoming Holiday. 

November 25, Wednesday Thanksgiving recess begins at noon. 

November 30, Monday Thanksgiving recess ends. Classes meet at 8:00 a.m. 

December 18, Friday Christmas Holidays begin at noon. 

1965 

January 4, Monday Christmas Holidays end. Classes meet at 8:00 a.m. 

January 21, Thursday First semester examinations begin. 

January 30, Saturday First semester examinations end. 

Second Semester 

February 2, Tuesday Registration of first year students for the second se- 
mester 8:00 to 10:30 a.m. Registration of old stu- 
dents for the second semester, 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

February 3, Wednesday Classes meet at 8:00 a.m. 

March 3, Wednesday Ash Wednesday, Chapel Service. 

March 20, Saturday Spring recess begins at noon. 

March 30, Tuesday Spring recess ends. Classes meet at 8:00 a.m. 

April 16, Friday Good Friday. 

April 18, Sunday Easter Day. 

May 24, Monday Second semester examinations begin. 

fune 2, Wednesday Second semester examinations end. 

fune 6, Sunday Commencement Day. 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1 9 64— 19 65 



School of Theology 

Summer, 1964 
July 15 — ^August 19 Graduate School of Theology. 

First Semester 
1964 

August 26, Wednesday Dormitory open for new students. 

August 27, Thursday Greek Program for new students. 

September 14, Monday Registration of all theological students, 

9:00-12:00. Orientation program 
for new students begins in afternoon. 

September 16, Wednesday Opening Convocation of University at 

12:10. 

September 18, Friday Regular Classes begin. 

October 10, Saturday Founders' Day. 

October 14, Wednesday St. Luke's Day Celebration, and 

October 15, Thursday DuBose Lectures. 

October 24, Saturday University Homecoming Holiday. 

November 25, Wednesday Thanksgiving recess begins at noon. 

November 30, Monday Thanksgiving recess ends. Classes re- 
sume. 

December 18, Friday Christmas Holidays begin at noon. 

1965 

January 4, Monday Christmas Holidays end. Classes resume. 

January 15, Friday Reading Period begins. 

January 21, Thursday First semester examinations begin. 

January 27, Wednesday First semester examinations end. 

Second Semester 

February i, Monday Registration of all theological students, 

9:00-12:00. 

February 2, Tuesday Classes begin. 

March 3, Wednesday Ash Wednesday Quiet Day. 

March 20, Saturday Spring recess begins. 

March 30, Tuesday Spring recess ends. Classes resume. 

April Samuel Marshall Seattle Lectures. 

April 16, Friday Good Friday. 

April 18, Sunday Easter Day. 

May 17, Monday Reading Period begins. 

May 24, Monday Second semester examinations begin. 

May 31, Monday Second semester examinations end. 

June 6, Sunday Commencement Day. 

Summer, 1965 
July 14 — ^August 18 Graduate School of Theology 



Calendar for 1965 



JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 



MARCH 



APRIL 



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17 18 19 20 21 22 23 ; 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 21 22 23 24 2S 26 27 

«4 2S 26 27 28 29 30 28 28 29 30 31 

31 : ■■■ 



S M T W T F S 

123 

4 S 6 7 8 9 10 
II 12 13 14 IS i6 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
2S 26 27 28 29 30 . . 



MAY 



JUNE 



JULY 



AUGUST 



S M T W T F S 

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9 10 II 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



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13 14 15 16 17 18 19 I II 12 13 14 IS 16 17 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
27 28 29 30 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



S M T W T F S 
123 4567 
8 9 10 II 12 13 14 
IS 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 



OCTOBER 



NOVEMBER 



DECEMBER 



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S 6 7 8 9 10 II 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 



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19 20 21 22 23 24 25 j 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 I 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 i 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 . . .. 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 I 28 29 30 26 27 28 29 30 31 . , 

i 31 ! ! 



Calendar for 1966 



JANUARY 



S M T W T F S 



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9 I o I I 1 2 1 3 1 4 I 1; 
16 17 18 19 20 21 2a 

23 24 25 26 27 28 2C 
30 31 



MAY 



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15 16 17 18 19 20 2: 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 



S M T W T F S 



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II 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 20 30 . 



FEBRUARY 



S M T W T F S 

.... 1234.=^ 
6 7 8 9 lo II 12 
13 14 IS 16 17 18 ro 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 



JUNE 



S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 

5 6 7 ^' 10 I ! 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
!9 20 2 ( 2 2 23 24. 2S 
26 27 28 29 30 ... 



OCTOBER 



S M T W T F S 

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9 10 II 12 13 14 IS 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 20 
-!0 - I 



MARCH 



S M T W T F S 

.... 12345 
6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 

13 14 IS 16 17 18 ic; 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 3 I . . . . 



JUT.Y 



T W T F S 



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10 II 12 13 14 15 16 

17 iS 10 20 2 1 2223 
24 25 26 27 28 29 ^o 

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13 14 IS 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 



APRIL 



S M T W T F S 

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10 II 12 13 1415 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

■ I 23456 
7 8 9 10 II 12 13 
14 15 1 6 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 2627 
-S 29 30 31 

DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

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18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



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THE UNIVERSITY 

HISTORY AND OBJECTIVES 



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH is a Christian institution, 
with a clearly discerned philosophy of Christian education, 
owned by twenty-one dioceses of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church. It has no religious restrictions but presumes the disposition 
of all members of its community to live within the spirit of its con- 
trolling concepts. Young men of all denominations are enrolled in the 
student body. 

The idea of The University of the South was bom in a mani'- 
festo signed and published by nine Southern bishops attending the 
General Convention of the Episcopal Church in Philadelphia in 1856; 
The leader in the movement was Bishop Leonidas Polk of Louisiana; 
This declaration was an invitation and an appeal to the Church in the 
South to take steps to found an institution of higher learning because, 
in the thought of the bishops' letter, "the establishing of a Christian 
University by our Church is a compelling necessity, for intelligence 
and moral sentiment are the support of government". 

In response to the call of the Philadelphia message, the bishops an^' 
the duly elected clergy and laymen of their several dioceses assembled 
on Lookout Mountain in Tennessee on July 4, 1857, the date of the 
founding of The University of the South as recorded in its his- 
tory. This assembly, which was actually a meeting of Trustees, deter- 
mined by formal resolution to establish a University. The Trustees 
launched plans for the great undertaking, appointed committees to 
carry on the preliminary work, and adjourned to gather again in the 
fall. 

According to agreement, the Trustees met in Montgomery, Alabama, 
on November 25, 1857. Here they named the institution which they 



O THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

were to build "The University of the South" and selected Sewa- 
nee, Tennessee, on a plateau In the Cumberland Mountains, as the 
site and home of the proposed University. And since that time The 
University of the South has been popularly known as "Sewanee". 

At historic Beersheba Springs, thirty miles north of Sewanee, the 
Trustees assembled for the third time on July 3, 1858. The charter 
of the University, granted by the Legislature of Tennessee on Janu- 
ary 6 of the same year, was presented to the Board of Trustees. 
Further plans were made to open the University as soon as possible. 

The cornerstone of The University of the South was laid on Oc- 
tober 10, i860. A great concourse of people gathered In the forest 
on the Mountain top for the impressive and significant ceremony. The 
whole scene was the romantic reality of a magnificent vision come 
true. Bishop Elliott of Georgia placed first In the cornerstone a copy 
of the Bible and then a copy of the Book of Common Prayer. 

Bishop Leonidas Polk of Louisiana formally laid the stone, speak- 
ing these words: "I, Leonidas Polk, D.D., Bishop of Louisiana, on 
this tenth day of October, In the year of grace one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty, do lay this cornerstone of an edifice to be here 
erected as the principal building of The University of the South, 
an institution established for the cultivation of true religion, learning, 
and virtue, that thereby God may be glorified and the happiness of 
man may be advanced." The Honorable John S. Preston of South 
Carolina delivered the oration. Among the many fine statements in 
his splendid address this sentence challenges the attention of men to- 
day as It did at that time: "Unless we are taught to use them In the 
right way, civil and religious liberties ai^e worthless and dangerous 
boons." 

Then came the Civil War. The conflict which raged for four years 
put an end temporarily to all plans to build the University. After 
the War came reconstruction. It appeared that the concept of a great 
Christian university might be lost in the struggle of contending armies 
and in the chaos and uncertainty that followed upon the heels of 
battle. 

But the dream lived on in the hearts and minds of men. After the 
strife was over and as the South began its valiant effort to rebuild It- 
self, men's thoughts turned again to the undertaking which had fired 
their Imagination. With heroism and renewed confidence the Church, 
under the leadership of Bishop Quintard of Tennessee, picked up the 



HISTORY AND OBJECTIVES 9 

threads that had been broken by the clash of arms and knit them to- 
gether again. 

In 1868 on September i8 The University of the South was 
opened, with an enrollment of nine students for its first session. There 
were only three frame buildings: St. Augustine's Chapel, Otey Hall, 
and Cobbs Hall. But that was enough. Courage had triumphed. 
The University envisioned by the bishops in Philadelphia had been 
established. Since that time ninety-six years have passed, years of 
toil and sacrifice on the part of a host of men and women loyal and de- 
voted to Sewanee and her mission, years of victory and defeat, of 
hope and disappointment, years of an abiding and steadfast faith not 
to be denied. The handful of students has grown. Buildings have 
been erected one by one. The University of the South is now com- 
posed of a College of Liberal Arts accommodating approximately seven 
hundred students, and a Theological School of eighty students. 
Apart from and near the University campus and governed by the same 
Board of Trustees is the Sewanee Military Academy, an excellent 
preparatory school of some two hundred and seventy-five boys. 

The first frame buildings of the early period have gone. Beautiful 
stone buildings have taken their place, all constructed of stone from 
the Mountain on which they stand. 

The Campus of the University is one of the loveliest in America, 
with its winding walks, green grass, and majestic oaks. Close by is 
the Mountain's edge with enchanting views of the valley below. 

Here conditions are almost ideal for the pursuit of learning, for 
growth of mind and spirit, for enrichment of personality, for develop- 
ment of nobility of character. 

Just as the establishing of a great Christian university in 1856 was 
a compelling necessity, the strength and permanence of The Univer- 
sity OF the South for the present and the future are also a compel- 
ling necessity. In this day as in that of the inception of Sewanee, in- 
telligence and moral sentiment are the support of government and 
society. In a society of free people there must be intelligence — en- 
lightened minds disciplined to wisdom — in order that the people may 
govern themselves securely and justly; there must be moral sanity and 
understanding, in order that the people may possess that righteousness 
which "exalteth a nation." 

Both intelligence and morality are necessary because the mind 
without the control and motivation of spiritual ideals is a negative or 



10 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

a destructive agency, and because spiritual idealism without intelli- 
gence is weak and futile. 

The aim and purpose of the University are clearly s'et forth in the 
following statement formulated by the University Senate: 

"We are definitely committed at Sewanee to the College of Liberal 
Arts as a distinct unit in the educational system of our country, with 
a contribution to make that can be made by no other agency. In an 
age when the demand for the immediately practical is so insistent, 
when the integrity of the College of Liberal Arts is imperiled by the 
demands of vocational training, we adhere to the basic function of the 
College of Liberal Arts: the training of youth in Christian virtue, in 
personal initiative, in self-mastery, in social consciousness, in aesthetic 
appreciation, in intellectual integrity, and in scientific methods of 
inquiry. 

"This function can best be performed in a small college through the 
medium of a faculty of character and distinction maintaining intimate 
personal contact with a carefully selected group of students. 

"As a further means, the curriculum of the College of Liberal Arts 
should not only be of a definite character but s'eek consistently and 
positively the correlation of the various branches of knowledge by re- 
ferring them to a fundamental principle in the light of which can be 
seen mathematics and physics reaching up through philosophy to the 
knowledge of God; biology, chemistry, and geology as a progressive 
revelation of the creative force in the universe; and economics, soci- 
ology, and political science looking forward to the realization of the 
Christian ideal of human society founded on the Brotherhood of Man 
and the Fatherhood of God. 

"The well-rounded curriculum recognizes the importance of ancient 
languages and literature and conserves thereby the best that there Is 
in the past of the race; it gives a position of emphasis to the study 
of the English language and literature, together with a training in ora- 
tory and debate, as necessary to a proper appreciation of our Anglo- 
Saxon traditions; it gives due recognition to pure science, the social 
sciences, and history as indispensable instruments for maintaining an 
intelligent contact with contemporary life and civilization; it Includes 
modern languages and literature as the surest means to a true under- 
standing of the manners and institutions of those nations who share 
with us the burdens of human progress; it looks to the study of phi- 
losophy as the agency which synthesizes and unifies all departments 



HISTORY AND OBJECTIVES II 

of human endeavor. The educational program of the College of Lib- 
eral Arts requires the recognition of the sanctity of the human body 
and the necessity for its development in wholesome and well-regulated 
athletics. 

"Furthermore, inasmuch as religious faith is the essential basis of 
right conduct and as that faith is best cultivated through the aid of 
Divine Revelation, The University of the South regards as indis- 
pensable to the realization of its ideals of cultured and useful man- 
hood systematic courses of instruction in the Bible. Finally, as there 
is no true progress without a goal. The University of the South 
states this to be the end objective of its effort in any and all of 
its departments: the realization of the Kingdom of God, which is the 
kingdom of love, as interpreted in the life and teaching of Jesus Christ. 

"The School of Theology is a constituent unit in The University of 
THE South. It Is an inevitable result of the idea of Christian education 
in the minds of the Founders. Its purpose is to train godly men to 
become able and worthy ministers of Christ as pastors and priests, 
prophets and teachers in His Church. Separated from the College by 
only the width of a road, it has its own faculty, its own curriculum, its 
own dormitories and student organizations, its own Chapel, and regular 
round of Church services; yet it is integrated socially and intellectually 
into the life of the University Community. It has access to any courses 
offered in the College of Arts and Sciences which constitute appropriate 
extensions or supplements to its curriculum. It shares all public lec- 
tures, concerts, plays, and art exhibitions, and has the full benefit of 
the general University Library and the Emerald-Hodgson HospitaL 
Thus it seeks to combine the advantages of concentration on a single 
common purpose and of contact with people of other vocations and 
mental disciplines so *that the man of God may be full grown, thor- 
oughly furnished unto all good works.' 

"It welcomes to its lovely Mountain home men with a sincere sense 
of vocation to know Christ and make Him known, and offers to them 
the guidance, friendship, and instruction of godly and experienced 
teachers in the Doctrine, Discipline, and Worship of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church." 












UNIVERSITY DOMAIN AND BUILDINGS 




EWANEE, the site of The University of the South, is lo- 
cated on the Cumberland Plateau about midway between 
Nashville and Chattanooga, Tennessee, on a branch of the 
Louisville and Nashville Railroad. U. S. Highway No. 64 from Mem- 
phis and the west to Chattanooga and the south and east passes 
through Sewanee. U. S. Highway No. 41 -A from Chicago to Florida 
also passes through Sewanee and connects with Highway No. 41 at 
Monteagle, Tennessee, about five miles northeast of Sewanee. 

Railroad tickets may be bought to Cowan, Tennessee, six miles away 
from Sewanee. Taxi transportation from Cowan to the University's 
campus is available. 

Bus riders may buy tickets either to Sewanee or to Monteagle, five 
miles away, from which taxi service is available. Plane tickets can be 
bought to Chattanooga or Nashville, with air-taxi or bus service from 
those points. 

Sewanee has telegraph service, express and money order facilities, 
a local bank, and stores in the village as well as the University's store 
on the campus. 

The Domain of The University of the South comprises ten thou- 
sand acres of land In the Cumberland Mountains at Sewanee, Ten- 
nessee, two thousand feet above sea level. Such an extensive Domain, 
completely under the ownership and control of the University, provides 
a rare location for a campus and affords unusual facilities for recreation 
and athletic sport of all sorts. The climate Is healthful and Invigorating. 

The Domain Is beautiful in itself and, reaching in many places to 
the Mountain's edge, presents beautiful scenes of mountains, hills, and 
valleys. 

All permanent buildings of the University are built of sandstone 



THE UNIVERSITY DOMAIN AND BUILDINGS I5 

found Upon the University's Domain. In the following paragraphs, 
a brief description of each building Is given. 

The Emerald-Hodgson Hospital. The Hodgson Memorial In- 
firmary, the first stone building for University uses, was erected in 
1877. This building, the gift of the Rev. Telfair Hodgson, D.D., and 
Mrs. Hodgson, in memory of a daughter, was intended for a library 
but, owing to changes in the general plan for University buildings, 
was found to be too far from the central group. In 1899 this beauti- 
t'ul structure was enlarged and converted Into a hospital, with wards 
for both free and pay patients. In 1908 another addition was built, 
containing a well-equipped operating room. On February 10, 191 1, 
this hospital, with the exception of the 1908 addition, was destroyed 
by fire. Liberal contributions made It possible to rebuild on a larger 
scale in 19 12. The new building, which is equipped in conformity 
with modern requirements. Is known as the Emerald-Hodgson Hos- 
pital. 

During 1950, the University constructed a pediatric wing with funds 
made available by the generosity of the Lilly Endowment, Inc., of 
Indianapolis, and by the untiring efforts of Dr. Oscar N. Torian. 

In 195 1, the University constructed a new nurses' home, the Frank 
P. Phillips Memorial Nurses' Home, and renovated the old nurses* 
home as an out-patient clinic. Funds for this construction were con- 
tributed by the Federal and State Governments and by Mrs. Frank P. 
Phillips of Columbus, Mississippi, in memory of her husband. 

St. Luke's Memorial Hall, the gift of Mrs. Charlotte Morris 
Manigault, of South Carolina, in memory of Mr. Lewis Morris, her 
father, was built in 1878 for the use of the School of Theology. In 
195 1, a wing was added, and in 1956-57 the entire building was reno- 
vated. St. Luke's Hall now contains lecture and seminar rooms, faculty 
offices, the Grosvenor Auditorium, the Library with five floors of stacks, 
a student lounge and faculty common room, and dormitory rooms for 
forty-six unmarried students. 

St. Luke's Memorial Chapel, the gift of the late Mrs. Telfair 
Hodgson, as a memorial to her husband, the Rev. Telfair Hodgson, 
D.D., at one time VIce-Chancellor of the University and Dean of the 
Theological School, stands a short distance to the south of St. Luke's 
Hall. 

Thompson Hall, named for the Hon. Jacob Thompson, of Miss- 
issippi, was erected in 1883 and enlarged in 1901. Mrs. James L. 
Houghteling of Chicago generously provided for the remodeling of 



^ 



14 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

this building as a memorial to her late husband, Mr. James L. Hough- 
teling. This building was destroyed by fire in March, 1950. It has 
been rebuilt and contains the student union, sandwich shop, and 
theatre. 

The Library Building, formerly known as Convocation Hall, is one 
of the most be^tiful buildings of the University. Its corner-stone was 
laid in the yeaK, 1886. Through the generosity of an alumnus, 
/^ this building was "^prnished and equipped as a library in 1901. 
^ In 1935, the General Education Board generously contributed $25,000 
^ for its renovation. The^ Reading Room was remodeled, and 
/ V'the basement was converteS\into f^ modern fire-proof stackroom. 
^' The tower that forms the entrahce 'to the Library is called Breslin 
t^S Tower, the funds for its erection having been donated by Thomas and 
Elizabeth Breslin in memory of their daughter Lucy. It is modeled 
after the tower of the Magdalen College Chapel, Oxford, is twenty- 
nine by thirty feet at the base, and rises to the height of a hundred 
feet. In 1900, the Rev. George William Douglas, D.D., of Tuxedo, 
New York, placed in the tower a clock and Westminster Chimes in 
memory of his mother, Mrs. Charlotte Ferris Douglas. 

Walsh-Ellett Hall contains administrative offices and classrooms 
of the College of Arts and Sciences. Originally this building was the 
gift of the late Vincent D. Walsh, of Louisiana, given as a memorial to 
his daughter, Susan Jessie, and erected in 1890. The renovation of 
this building, completed in 1959, was the gift of the late Dr. Edward 
Coleman Ellett, an alumnus of this University. 

Palmetto, a frame building, is the headquarters of the Air Force 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps. 

Dormitories. Students of the University are housed in modern fire- 
proof dormitories. These buildings, which are centrally located and 
contain matron's quarters, students' common room, and accommoda- 
tions for 40 to TOO students each, are: Hoffman Hall (built 192 1), 
Elliott Hall (formerly Sewanee Inn, built 1922), Cannon Hall (built 
1925), Johnson Hall (built 1926), Tuckaway Inn (built 1930), Gailor 
Hall (built 1952), Hunter Hall (built 1953), Sessums Cleveland Hall 
(built 1955), Benedict Hall (built 1963), and McCrady Hall (built 
1964). The lower floor of Tuckaway Inn is used for the classrooms 
and studios of the Department of Fine Arts and for the Art Gallery. 
Gailor Memorial Hall contains a dining room for 700 students 
and dormitory space for 80 students. In 1946 the University erected 
frame buildings to provide for increased enrollment. These are Barton 
Hall, Selden Hall, and the Woodland Apartments for married students. 



THE UNIVERSITY DOMAIN AND BUILDINGS 1 5' 

Sewanee Inn, the gift of a few alumni and friends, was opened in 
1958 for the accommodation of visitors. Claramont Restaurant ad- 
joins the motel-type Inn. 

The Frank A. Juhan Gymnasium, completed in the fall of 1957, 
has the following facilities: a basketball arena seating 1,500 spectators, 
shower facilities for home team and visitors, a swimming pool con- 
forming to N.C.A.A. standards with adjoining shower rooms, a rifle 
range, bowling alleys, a visiting team dormitory, an intramural gym- 
nasium floor for basketball, volleyball, and badminton, dressing rooms 
for physical education and intramural athletics, two handball courts, 
dressing rooms and showers for the football team, a training room, a 
wrestling room, a gymnastics room, coaches' offices, and a trophy room. 
The Eugene O. Harris Memorial Stadium was built on Hardee Field 
in 1957. 

All Saints' Chapel. The financial panic of 1907 arrested the build- 
ing of All Saints' Chapel, but even in its incomplete form it was fof 
half a century the spiritual center of the University. This magnificent 
Church in collegiate Gothic style is now completed. 

The Campanile, which is 143 feet high, is known as Shapard Tower 
and is the gift of the Robert P. Shapard family of Griffin, Georgia. The 
tower contains one of the world's best and largest carillons, given by 
W. Dudley Gale of Nashville, Tennessee, in honor of his great grand- 
father, Bishop Leonidas Polk of Louisiana, who was one of the founders 
of the University. 

Guerry Hall. This building provides auditorium, art gallery, class- 
room, and office facilities. The building honors the late Dr. Alexander 
Guerry, a member of the class of 1910, of Sewanee and Chattanooga, 
the University's Vice-Chancellor from 1938 until his death in 1948. It 
was completed in the summer of 1961. 

The Carnegie Science Hall, the gift of Mr. Andrew Carnegie, is 
a handsome sandstone building providing accommodations for the de- 
partments of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. 

In April of 1940, upon the successful completion of the campaign 
for a Sustaining Fund of $500,000 the General Education Board of 
New York made a grant for $25,000 for the renovation of the in- 
terior of Science Hall, for furniture for the building, and for the pur- 
chase of laboratory apparatus and material. The expenditure of this 
sum has given The University of the South exlceptionally fine ao 



l6 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

commodations and equipment for instruction and study in the field of 
the natural sciences. 

The six-inch telescope given to the University in 1913 by Mrs. J. L. 
Harris of New Orleans is installed in a well constructed observatory, 
the erection of which was made possible by the generosity of the 
General Education Board. 

In 1957 the College, through its departments of Biology, Chemistry, 
and Physics, constructed a Radioactive Isotopes Laboratory. This 
laboratory contains the latest equipment necessary for Instructional 
and research use of radioactive material. 

The Snowden Forestry Building, built in 1962, contains io,ooa 
square feet of floor space. Adequate offices, classrooms, and labora- 
tories with adjoining greenhouse offer the Sewanee forestry student 
the newest and best facilities in the South. The rooms in the two-story 
stone structure are paneled In different woods and present a working 
laboratory for the student. In this building is displayed a collection 
of 8,600 different wood species. Over 300 gavels, each made from a 
different wood, complete the wood technology collection. 

In addition to these public buildings, the University also owns a 
number of residences for accommodation of its officers and faculty. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION I7 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

EDWARD McCRADY 

BA.f LLD., College of Charleston; M.S., University of Pittsburgh; 

PhJD., University of Pennsylvania; LL.D., University of Chattanooga; 

ScJD., Southwestern at Memphis; L.HJ)., Concord College 

Fice-Chancellor 

GASTON SWINDELL BRUTON 
BA., M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Provost and Professor of Mathematics 

♦The Very Rev. GEORGE MOVER ALEXANDER 

BA., B.D., S.T.M., The University of the South; 

D.D., Virginia Theological Seminary; 

S.T.D., Seabury-Westem Theological Seminary 

Dean of the School of Theology 

ROBERT SAMUEL LANCASTER 

BA., Hampden-Sydney; M.A., The University of the South; 

Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and 

Professor of Political Science 



GEORGE MERRICK BAKER 

BA, Ph.D., Yale University; D.Lirr., The University of tlie South 

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Emeritus, and 

Professor of Germanic Languages, Emeritus 

WILLIAM WATERS LEWIS 

C.E., The University of the South 

Professor of Spanish, Emeritus, and 

Secretary of the University Senate, Emeritus 

EUGENE MARK KAYDEN 
BA., University of Colorado; M.A., Harvard University ; 
Professor of Economics, Emeritus 

PAUL SCOFIELD McCONNELL 

BA., University of Southern California; A.M., Princeton University; AAGO 

Professor of Music, Emeritus, and University Organist, Emeritus 

The Rev. VESPER OTTMER WARD 

BA., Ohio Wesleyan; S.T.B., Boston University School of Theology; 

S.T.M., S.T.D., Seabury-Westem; D.D., Ohio Wesleyan 

Professor of Christian Education and Homiletics, Emeritus 



•On leave second semester 1963-1964. 



l8 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

ROBERT LOWELL PETRY 

BA^ Earlham College; B.S., Haverford College; PhX)., Prmceton University 

Professor of Physics 

JOHN SEDBERRY MARSHALL 

BA., Pomona College; Ph.D., Boston University 

Professor of Philosophy 

ARTHUR BUTLER DUGAN 

AJB^ A.M^ Princeton University; B.Litt., Oxford University; 

Diploma in Economics and Political Science, Oxford University 

Professor of Political Science 

CHARLES TRAWICK HARRISON 

A.B., University of Alabama; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Jesse Spalding Professor of English Literature 

STRATTON BUCK 

A3., University of Michigan; A.M., Columbia University; 

Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Professor of French 

CHARLES EDWARD CHESTON 

B.S., Syracuse University; M.F., Yale School of Forestry 

Annie B. Snowden Professor of Forestry 

JAMES EDWARD THOROGOOD 

BJV., M.A., The University of the South; Ph.D., University of Texas 

Professor of Economics and Business 

JAMES MILLER GRIMES 

BA., MA., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Professor of History 

♦HOWARD MALCOLM OWEN 
BA., Hampden-Sydney; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 
Professor of Biology 

MONROE KIRK SPEARS 

A.B., AM.f University of South Carolina; Ph.D., Princeton University 

Professor of English 

FREDERICK RHODES WHITESELL 

A3., A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of California 

Professor of German 

•On leave first semester 1963 -1964. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION I9 

MAURICE AUGUSTUS MOORE, III 

/5.S., The University of the South; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Professor of English 

JOHN MAURICE WEBB 

B.A., Duke University; M.A., Yale University; 

Ph.D., Duke University 

Dean of Men and Francis S. Houghteling Professor of American History 

ADRIAN TIMOTHY PICKERING 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Professor of Spanish 

DAVID BENNETT CAMP 

B.S., The College of William and Mary; Ph.D., University of Rochester 

F. B. Williams Professor of Chemistry 

. BAYLY TURLINGTON 
BA., The University of the South; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 

Professor of Classical Languages and 
Marshal of the University Faculties 

♦HARRY CLAY YEATMAN 

BA., M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Professor of Biology 

The Rev. JOHN HOWARD WINSLOW RHYS 

BA., McGill University; L.Tii., Montreal Diocesan Theological College; 

S.T.B., S.T.M., Th.D., General Theological Seminary 

Professor of New Testament 

Major FRANK RAYMOND MURRAY 

BA., College of St. Joseph; M.S., University of Colorado 

Professor of Air Science 

ABBOTT GOTTEN MARTIN 

B.A., M.A., University of Mississippi 

Associate Professor of English 

ROBERT ARTHUR DEGEN 

B.S., M.A., Syracuse University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Associate Professor of Economics and Business 

GILBERT FRANK GILCHRIST 

BA., The University of the South; MA., Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

•On leave second semester 1963-1964. 



20 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The Rev. DAVID BROWNING COLLINS 

BA., BD., S.T.M., The University of the South 

Diploma with credit, St. Augustine's College, Canterbury 

Associate Professor of Religion and Chaplain of the University 

ALFRED SCOTT BATES 

BA., Carleton College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsm 

Associate Professor of French 

♦The Rev. CHARLES LAYFAETTE WINTERS, Jr. 

BA., Brown University; B.D., Virginia Theological Seminary; 

S.TM., Union Theological Seminary; Th.D., General Theological Seminary 

Associate Professor of Dogmatic Theology 

WILLIAM BENTON GUENTHER 

A.B., Oberlm College; M.S., Ph.D., The University of Rochester 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

The Rev. JAMES WILLIAM BRETTMANN 

B.S., BD., The University of the South; B.Litt., Oxford University 

Associate Professor of Religion and Assistant Chaplain 

HUGH PL\RRIS CALDWELL, Jr. 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; M.S., Emory University 

Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

The Rev. CHRISTOPHER FITZSIMONS ALLISON 

BA.., The University of the South; B.D., Virginia Theological Seminary 

D.Phil., Oxford University 

Associate Professor of Ecclesiastical History 

STEPHEN ELLIOTT PUCKETTE 

B.S., The University of the South; M.S., M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

*HENRY WILDS SMITH 

B.A., Dartmouth; M.F., D.F., Yale University 

Associate Professor of Forestry 

tBRINLEY JOHN RHYS 

B.A., George Peabody College for Teachers; M.A., Vanderbllt University; 

Ph.D., Tulane University 

Associate Professor of English 

CHARLES O'CONNOR BAIRD 

B.S., University of Tennessee; M.F., Yale University; D.F., Duke University 

Associate Professor of Forestry and 

Director of the Summer School 



•On leave first semester 1963-1964. 
tOn leave 1963- 1964. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 21' 

MARVIN ELIAS GOODSTEIN 

B.S., New York University; Ph.D., Cornell University 

Associate Professor of Economics 

JAMES THOMAS CROSS 

A.B., Brown University; M.S., Harvard University; Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

SAMUEL ALEXANDER McLEOD 

BA., MA., University of North Carolina 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

WILLIAM THEODORE ALLEN 

B.A., Oberlin College; M.S., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Associate Professor of Physics 

The Rev. JOHN MAURICE GESSELL 

B.A., B.S., Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professor of Pastoral Theology and Assistant to the Dean 

CHARLES WILLIAM FOREMAN 

BA., University of North Carolina; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University 

Associate Professor of Biology 

ANDREW NELSON LYTLE 

B.A., Vanderbilt University 

Lecturer in English and Editor of The Sewanee Review 

HARRY STANFORD BARRETT 

Art Students* League; Beaux Arts Academy; University of London, Slade School; 

Heatherley*s, London; Julian's Academy, Paris; La Grande Chaumiere, Parii; 

Atelier of Gemand Leger, Paris; Art Center School, Los Angeles 

Artist in Residence 

ELLIS NIMMO TUCKER 

B.A., MA., University of Virginia 

Lecturer in Mathematics 

THADDEUS CONSTANTINE LOCKARD, Jr. 

BA., University of Mississippi; M.A., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of German 

IThe Rev. GRANVILLE CECIL WOODS, Jr. 

BA., Vanderbilt University; B.D., Virginia Theological Seminary; 

S.T.M., Yale Divinity School 

Assistant Professor of Liturgies and Chaplain to the School of Theology 

•K)n leave 1963-1964. 



22 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

THOMAS FELDER DORN 

B.S,, Duke University; Ph.D., University of WashingtMi 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

GEORGE SHUFORD RAMSEUR 

BA^ Elon College; M.Ed., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

The Rev. WILLIAM AUGUSTIN GRIFFIN 

B.A., Duke University; B.D., M.A., Yale University 

Assistant Professor of Old Testament Language and Interpretation 

Major WILLIAM FRANCIS CAMPBELL 

B.S., Montclair State College 

Assistant Professor of Air Science 

WILLIAM BRUNER CAMPBELL 

B.S., Davidson College; M.A., University of Texas 

Assistant Professor of History 

Captain J. H. ALLEN KEPLEY 

B.S., Western Kentucky State Teachers College 

Assistant Professor of Air Science 

MARTHA McCRORY 

B^., University of Michigan; M.M., University of Rochester 

Assistant Professor of Music 

The Rev. WILLIAM HENRY RALSTON, Jr. 

BA^ The University of the South; S.T.B., S.T.M., General Theological Seminary 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy of Religion and Ethics 

ROBERT LARRY KEELE 

BA., The University of the South; M.A., Ph.D., Emory University 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

KENNETH RUDGE WILSON JONES 

BA^ Davidson College; MA., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Assistant Professor of French 

JOSEPH MARTIN RUNNING 

B.Mus., St. Olaf College 
Assistant Professor of Music and University Organist 

DONALD BOWIE WEBBER 

B.S., U. S. Military Academy; MA., Duke University 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 

The Rev. HENRY LEE HOBART MYERS 

B.A., The University of the South; S.T.B., General Theological Seminary 

Assistant Professor of Pastoral Theology 



•Second semester 1963-1964. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION IJ 

•CHARLES MATHEWS BINNICKER, Jr. 

BA, The University of the South; M.A., Florida State University 

Instructor in Classical Languages 

IRA BOLGER READ 
B.A., Milligan College; M.A., Emory University 
Instructor in History 

ERIC WOODFIN NAYLOR 

BA., The University of the South; MA., Ph.D., University of Wisconsm 

Instructor in Spanish 

ANITA SHAFER GOODSTEIN 

BA., Mount Holyoke College; MA., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Instructor in History 

HENRY FRANK ARNOLD, J». 

BA., The University of the South; M.A., Harvard University 

Instructor in English 

SAMUEL BURWELL BARNETT CARLETON 

BA., The University of the South; M.A., The Johns Hopkms University 

Instructor in Classical Languages 

RICHARD JOHNSTONE CORBIN 

BA., The University of the South; MA., Tulane University 

Instructor in English 

The Rev. WILLIAM ROBERT MERRILL 

B.S., M.S. in Psychology, Iowa State University; 

B.D., Episcopal Theological School 

Instructor 

1The Rev. THOMAS GAILOR GARNER, Jr. 
B.S., Tennessee Polytechnic Institute; B.D., The University of the South 

Tutor 

RALPH OLIN MARSH 

A.B., Emory University 

Assistant in Speech 

WILLIAM LANSING HOBART 

B.S.F., University of Michigan; M.F., Duke University 

Assistant in Forestry 

ARTHUR WILLIAM KRUMBACH, Jr. 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Assistant in Forestry 

EVANDER RODERICK McIVER, III 
Assistant in Forestry 

•On leave 1963-1964. 
tSecond semester 1963-1964. 



24 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



EDWARD McCRADY, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., LL.D., ScD., LJI.D. 
Vice-Chancellor 

GASTON SWINDELL BRUTON, BJV., M.A., Ph.D. 
Provost 

Tm Vert Rev. GEORGE MOYER ALEXANDER, BA., B.D., S.T.M., DX)., S.TD. 
Dean of the School of Theology 

ROBERT SAMUEL LANCASTER, B-A., M.A., PhX). 
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Thb Rev. DAVID BROWNING COLLINS, BA., BX)., S.TM. 
Chaplain 

JOHN MAURICE WEBB, B.A., MA., PhX). 
Dean of Men in the College of Arts and Sciences 

The Rev. MASSEY HAMILTON SHEPHERD, JR., 

BA., MA, BX)., S.TX)., Ph.D., D.D., LirrX)., 

Director^ Graduate School of Theology 

The Rev. JOHN MAURICE GESSELL, B.A., B.D., Ph.D. 
Assistant to the Dean of the School of Theology 

DOUGLAS LOUGHMILLER VAUGHAN, JR., B.S. 
Treasurer 

GEORGE HENRY BARKER. B.S. 
Assistant Treasurer 

JOHN BOSTICK RANSOM, III, BA., MA., D.S., Sorbonne 
Director of Admissions 

WILLIAM GREGORY HARKINS, A.B., B.S. in L.S., MA. in L.S. 

Librarian 

JOHN IREL HALL HODGES, B.S. m L.S., MA. 

Associate Librarian 

Miss CORINNE BURG, BA., B.S. in L.S. 

Cataloguer 

Mk8. ELLEN BARNETT TIMMONS, A.B., B.S. in L.S. 
Reference and Circulation Librarian 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 25 

THOMAS EDWARD CAMP, B.A., M.S. m L.S. 
Librarian, School of Theology 

Mi8« MARGARET ELIZABETH NEWHALL, A.B, B.S. m L.S., B.S. in Ed, MA 

Assistant Librarian, School of Theology 

The Rev. FRANK WALL ROBERT, BA, B.D., M.S. 
Assistant Librarian, School of Theology 

WILLIAM PORTER WARE 
Registrar 

The Rt. Rev. FRANK ALEXANDER JUHAN, DX). 
Director of Development 

ARTHUR BENJAMIN CHITTY, JR., B.A., MA. 

Director of Public Relations, Executive Director of the Associated Alumni, 

and Historiographer 

Mrs. jean TALLEC 
Campaign Director 

ARTHUR CHARLES COCKETT, BA. 
Coordinator of Summer Conferences 

Mrs. FREDERICK RHODES WHITESELL, Ph.B. 
Assistant Director of Public Relations 

WALTER DAVID BRYANT, JR., B.A., MA. 
Director of Athletics 

SHIRLEY INMAN MAJORS 
Football Coach 

LON SHELTON VARNELL, B.S. 
Basketball Coach 

JAMES HORACE MOORE, JR., B.S. 
Wrestling Coach and Assistant Football Coach 

CLARENCE CARTER. B.S. 
Assistant Coach in Football, Basketball, and Track 

TED DANIEL BITONDO, B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Physical Education 

Major FRANK RAYMOND MURRAY, USAF, BA., M.S. 
Commander, Air Force ROTC 



26 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

T. Sgt. JOHN PAUL KEELING, USAF 
Supply Supervisor, Air Force ROTC 

T. Sgt. MARION RUDOLPH ENNIS, USAF 
Sgt. Mjr., Air Force ROTC 

S. Sgt. DALLAS JACK PILCHER. USAF 
Senior Clerk, Air Force ROTC 

ARNOLD MIGNERY, B.S.F., M.F. 
Officer in Charge, Setvanee Forestry Research Center 

JAMES DONALD BURTON, B.S.F., M.F., M.S. 
Research Forester 

THOMAS EMMET RUSSELL, B.S. 
Research Forester 

GLENDON WILLIAM SMALLEY, B.S.F., M.S. 
Research Forester 

MELVIN LEONARD SOUTHWICK, BA. 
Administrator, Emerald-Hodgson Hospital 

HENRY TOMPKINS KIRBY-SMITH, M.D. 
Chief of Medical Staff, Emerald-Hodgson Hospital 

JAMES CEDRIC GATES 
Business Manager and Director of Auxiliary Enterprises 

ARTHUR EDWARD NIMITZ, B.S. in C.E.. B.S. in Arch. 
Architect and Engineer 

SOLLACE MITCHELL FREEMAN 

Superintendent of Leases, Military Property Custodian, 

and Manager of the Sezvanee Union 

THOMAS GORDON HAMILTON 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

ABBOTT GOTTEN MARTIN, B.A., M.A. 

Superintendent of the Sewanee Ravine Gardens 

JOHN CALHOUN SUTHERLAND 
Manager of the University Press 

PAUL WESLEY MOONEY 
Manager of the University Dairy 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION Zf 

RONALD WARD GOODMAN 

Manager of the University Farm 

DuVAL GARLAND CRAVENS. B.A. 
Manager of the University Supply Store 

JAMES WILLIAM SHERRILL 

Manager of the University Laundry 

WILLIAM NATLL\NIEL PORTER 
Manager of Gailor Dining Hall 

LESLIE McLAURIN, LT. COL., USAF 

Manager of the University Airport 

PROCTORS 
Harton Hall: *DANIEL DUNSCOMB DUNCAN, III 

♦HERBERT RAY TUCKER 
Benedict Hall: ELLWOOD BROWN HANNUM 

MARTIN LUTHER AGNEW, JR. 
Cannon Hall: JAMES ROBERT STEWART 
Qeveland Hall: FRANK WEILAND STUBBLEFIELD 
Elliott Hall: ROBERT PHELPS DAVIS 
GaUor Hall: WILLIAM FRANKLIN ROEDER, JR. (Head Pre tc.i ) 

JACK PALMER SANDERS 
Hoffman Hall: WILLIAM LUNDEEN STIRLING 
Hunter Hall: ALLEN MEADORS WALLACE 
Johnson Hall: JOHN DOUGLAS SEITERS 
McCrady Hall: **DANIEL DUNSCOMB DUNCAN, III 

♦♦HERBERT RAY TUCKER 

♦♦WILLIAM ST. CLAIR WADE 
Selden Hall: ♦WILLIAM ST. CLAIR WADE 
St. Luke's Hall: WILLIAM LANSING HOBART 
Tuckaway Inn: ALFRED CHARLES SCHMUTZER, JR. 
Woodland Apartments: CARL ELDRIDGE JONES 

MATRONS 

Benedict Hall: Mrs. WILLIAM J. OAKES 
Cannon Hall: ♦Mrs. MARY M. CHANEY 

♦♦Mrs. may R. GARDINER 
Cleveland Hall: Mrs. MARGARET L. JONES 
Elliott Hall: Mrs. WILLIAM T. DOSWELL 
Gailor Hall: Mrs. J. A. SHARP 
Hoffman Hall: Mrs. MILDRED MOORE 
Hunter Hall: Mrs. PATRICIA MOORE 
Johnson Hall: Mrs. GLENN B. McCOY 
McCrady Hall: ♦♦Mrs. MARY M. CHANEY 
Tuckaway Hall: Mrs. THOMAS R. WARING 

♦First Semester 
••Second Semester 



28 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

PETER HESS BECKWITH, A.B. 
Sacristan, School of Theology 

BARCLAY DEVANE WILSON, B.S. 
Assistant Sacristan 

MILTON KING WRIGHT, BA. 
Student Organist, School of Theology 

Mm. KATHERINE KEEN STEWART 
Manager, St, Luke*s Book Store 

JAMES SAMUEL BROWN, JR. 
Student Fire Chief 



STANDING COMMITTEES 29 

THE UNIVERSITY STANDING COMMITTEES 

Administrative Committees 

Athletic Board of Control: Professors Owen, Caldwell, McLeod; 
Vice-Chancellor McCrady; Mr. Willie Joe Shaw, Jr.; student John 
Philip Frontier. 

Catalogue: Provost Bruton; Deans Alexander, Lancaster; Professors 
Gilchrist, Moore, Turlington; Mr. Ransom. 

Faculty Chairman of Athletics: Professor Gaston S. Bruton. 

Fire Protection: Mr. Oates; Professor Cheston; Dr. Cameron; Mr. 
Hamilton, Mr. Vaughan; student James Samuel Brown, Jr. 

Lease: Vice-Chancellor McCrady; Professors Bruton, Cheston; Mr. 
Freeman, Mr. Oates. 

Faculty Committees 

Appointments and Promotions: Professors Yeatman, Buck, White- 
sell, Winters. 

Building Committee: Professors Bates, Cheston, Grimes, Harrison, 
Whitesell; Mr. Hodges. 

Concerts Committee: Professors Guenther, Caldwell, Lockard, Mc- 
Crory, Ralston, Running, Spears; students William Alexander Furt- 
wangler, Walter Luvenda Cowart. 

duPont Lectures Committee: Professors Gessell, Buck, Grimes, 
J. H. W. Rhys; Mr. Lytle; students Warner Armstrong Stringer, Jr., 
William Lundeen Stirling. 

Graduate Scholarships: Professors Dugan, Bruton, Harrison, Ralston. 

Library: Professors Allison, Camp, Gilchrist, Lancaster, Turlington; 
Mr. Harkins, Mr. Hodges. 

Publications Board: Mr. Chitty; Professors Baird, Griffin, Moore; 
Mr. Arnold, Mr. Lytle; students Henry George Garrison, John Brown 
Hagler, Jr., Douglas John Milne. 

Research Grants: Professors Caldwell, Ralston, Yeatman. 

Tenure: Professors Buck, Caldwell, J. H. W. Rhys, Thorogood. 



;?0 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 



THE UNIVERSITY SENATE 

With powers and duties defined in the Ordinances of the University. 
Composed of the Vice-Chancellor, Deans, Chaplain, and all Full Professors. 



EDWARD McCRADY 

Ficf -Chancellor, Chairman 

ROBERT L. PETRY 
GASTON S. BRUTON 
JOHN S. MARSHALL 
ARTHUR B. DUGAN 
CHARLES T. HARRISON 

STRATTON BUCK 

CHARLES E. CHESTON 

[AMES E. THOROGOOD 

JAMES M. GRIMES 

H. MALCOLM OWEN 

MONROE K. SPEARS 

DAVID B. COLLINS 

FREDERICK R. WLIITESELL 

ROBERT S. LANCASTER 

GEORGE M. ALEXANDER 

MAURICE A. MOORE, III 

JOHN M. WEBB 

A. TIMOTHY PICKERING 

DAVID B. CAMP 

BAYLY TURLINGTON 

HARRY C. YEAI'MAN 

J. HOWARD W. RHYS 

FRANK R. MURRAY 



GENERAL INFORMATION 3 1 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

ADMISSION 
The University of the South embraces the College of Arts and 
Sciences and the School of Theology. Statements concerning admission 
will be found in the sections of this catalogue dealing with the two 
schools. Candidates for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences 
should communicate with the Director of Admissions, preferably at 
least a year prior to the date of entrance; candidates for the School 
of Theology should write to the Dean of the School of Theology to 
secure the proper application blanks. 

DEGREES 
The University of the South awards, on due examination, the de- 
grees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science in Forestry, Bachelor 
of Divinity, Master of Sacred Theology, Master of Arts in Teaching, 
and Licentiate in Theology. The honorary degrees of Doctor of Civil 
Law, Doctor of Letters, Doctor of Science, Doctor of Music, and Doctor 
of Divinity are conferred by the Board of Regents. 

EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS 
The University of the South is a member of the Southern As- 
sociation of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the Association of Ameri- 
can Colleges, the College Entrance Examination Board, the Tennessee 
College Association, the American Council on Education, the Southern 
University Conference, and the Foundation of Episcopal Colleges. It 
is a contributing member of the American School of Classical Studies 
in Athens, Greece, and of the American Academy in Rome. The 
credits of The University of the South are accepted by all institu- 
tions of higher learning in this country and abroad. 

THE LIBRARY 

The first permanent stone structure erected in Sewanee, built by 
The Rev. Telfair Hodgson, D.D., was specifically for a library — a 
Significant fact, emphasizing the conception of a library as the center 
of intellectual life of the University. This was in 1877, nine years 
after the University opened. This building was found, however, 
to be somewhat remote from the center of University activities, 
and when, at the beginning of the 90's, the Walsh Memorial Hall was 
completed as the chief building for academic purposes, the most fre- 



32 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

quently used books were transferred to a large room in this building 
so as to be more accessible. Ten years later, in 1901, this working 
library and all collections of books belonging to the University were 
removed from the cramped quarters in Walsh Hall to the adjoining 
Convocation Building, which through the generosity of an alumnus 
was furnished and equipped for library purposesT^.Tkis was aJQFlu- 
nate change, for the pres^ home of the library is nc^^i^y:*^^ most 
attractive' lrchiteGtii|;i^^of the University's stg^k^^^lructures, buts^lso 
the physical cep^rf of the University groj^/thus affording a natun 
focus of ali/^cademic activities. A wing of Guerry Hall is now being 
used as a reading room and stack room. 

At present the Library contains approximately 100,000 volumes. It 
is a desigiia ted depository of United States Government publications, 
and also subscribes to tfe ka4ilig p^iodicals of both general and aca- 
demic value. ,.^^- '^ 

Apart from the regular annual appropriations by the University for - 
the support of the Library, there may be noted: 

The Esther Elliott Shoup Book Fund — ^the income from $2,000 to 
be used for the purchase of books. 

The Polk Library Fund — $15,000, the gift of Mr. Frank L. Polk 
in memory of his grandfather and father. Bishop Leonidas Polk and 
Dr. William M. Polk. The income is used for the purchase of books. 

Other funds which contribute to the income of the Library at pres- 
ent are the Prescott Fund for books and periodicals; the Francis Fund 
for books in the field of history; and the FPo e mtly -*'e»l»yf^ed William 
Alexander Percy Memorial Fund for the purchase of books by Ameri- 
can authors. In addition to these endowments the Library has re- 
ceived many special gifts of books and money. Notable among the 
fine collections are the Fairbanks Collection of early Florida history; 
the Manigault Collection of folios containing the works of famous 
medieval churchmen; and the Houghteling Collection of American 
History. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

All Saints' Chapel is central to the religious life of the University. 

St. Luke's Chapel is the chapel of the School of Theology, but all 

members of the University are welcome to attend its services. The 

University Chaplain lives in close contact with students, and is a regu- 



GENERAL INFORMATION 33 

iar member of the College Faculty. The Chaplain is accessible to 
students at all times. 

Students in the college are required to attend chapel as follows: 
Gownsmen, daily chapel 30 times and Sunday services 6 times a se- 
mester; non-gownsmen, daily chapel 35 times and Sunday services 7 
times a semester. In All Saints' Chapel, there is a daily service of 
shortened Morning Prayer; Holy Communion is celebrated and Even- 
ing Prayer is said daily except on Wednesdays and Fridays. St. Luke's 
Chapel provides services of Holy Communion and Evening Prayer for 
those two days. During Lent, there are special services, including a 
Twilight Service on Thursday evenings. 

College students participate actively, in many ways, in the life of 
All Saints' Chapel. The Student Vestry is an advisory council to the 
Chaplain; students serve as Acolytes, as Crucifers, and as members of 
the University Choir. 

There are numerous visitors throughout the year who speak or 
preach in the Chapel. Many of them hold conferences with groups of 
students at the Chaplain's house. 

THE ART GALLERY 

The Art Gallery is located in Lower Tuckaway Inn and is under the 
supervision of the Chairman of the Department of Fine Arts. Exhibi- 
tions are held periodically during the year, and all are invited to submit 
entries. 

THE ORDER OF GOWNSMEN 
Students in both schools of the University — ^the College of Arts and 
Sciences and the School of Theology — are eligible, after meeting cer- 
tain requirements which are prescribed by the Faculties, to member- 
ship in the Order of Gownsmen. Gownsmen are distinguished by 
their academic dress. 

They enjoy certain privileges and immunities, and they share re- 
sponsibility for maintaining the standards of student conduct. The 
Gownsmen's Committee on Discipline has direct authority to enforce 
certain rules of conduct, and it serves as an advisory fcommittee to 
the Dean of Men in dealing with more serious disciplinary matters. 

Members of the Order are chosen to serve as student Proctors, 
charged with the supervision of behavior and the care of property in 



34 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

University dormitories. The Proctors are under the direction of a 
student Head Proctor and are directly responsible to the Provost. 

THE HONOR CODE 
Students in the University subscribe, upon entrance, to an Honor 
Code, which assumes that any adequate conception of honor demands 
tliat a man shall not lie, steal, or cheat. All examinations are con- 
ducted under this code, and violations of the code are referred for 
judgment to a Student Honor Council, consisting of representatives 
from each class. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

Sopherim, a students' literary society, is the mother chapter of 
Sigma Upsilon; it provides an opportunity for the practice and the 
criticism of imaginative writing. The Debate Council^ for students 
interested in public speaking, fosters both local and intercollegiate 
activity in debating and oratory. Purple Masque is a dramatic or- 
ganization; under its Faculty director, it stages a series of plays 
through the academic year. 

The following honor societies have chapters in the University: Phi 
Beta Kappa (scholarship), Omicron Delta Kappa (leadership), Blue 
Key (service). Pi Gamma Mu (social sciences). Alpha Psi Omega (dra- 
matics), Sigma Upsilon (writing). Pi Sigma Alpha (political science), 
Sigma Pi Sigma (physics), and Arnold Air Society. 

Ten national sdcial fraternities have chapters at Sewanee: ATQ, 
2AE, K2, MO, ATA, KA, ^FA, 2N, B0II, and AXA. These are 
governed by the laws of the University and by a Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil of their own representatives. Each of these fraternities has its own 
chapter house. The Association of Independent Men is a social group. 

The Waiters' Guild is composed of students who work in the dining 
hall. Several departments, including Athletics, Forestry, French, Ger- 
man. Political Science, and Spanish have clubs to further students' in- 
terest and proficiency in these fields. In addition to fraternities, there 
are many social groups for students. 

LECTURES AND CONCERTS 

The University has an endowed lecture program known as the du- 
Pont Lectures. The lecturers, who are of international reputation, are 
chosen to represent the various fields of knowledge with particular re- 
gard to the fields of theology, humanities and languages, natural science, 



GENERAL INFORMATION 35 

and social science. There are two memorial lectures: The William P. 
DuBose and the Samuel Marshall Beattie. In addition, many organi- 
zations and departments sponsor visiting lecturers in both general and 
particular fields throughout the year. 

The Concerts Committee, under faculty direction, presents annually 
a varied program of music, dance, drama, and films featuring distin- 
guished artists. Student organizations such as the German Club, Jazz 
Society, Choir, Glee Club, Purple Masque, and the Sewanee Com- 
munity Theatre not only provide entertainment, but also permit p^ar- 
ticlpation of interested students. 

ATHLETICS 

The University of the South provides the most extensive and at- 
tractive facilities possible for athletic sports and recreation. In addition 
to the Juhan Gymnasium, described on page 15, the athletic facilities 
at Sewanee are two playing fields for football and baseball, a quarter- 
mile cinder track, a nine-hole golf course, and seven all-weather tennis 
courts. The Domain and adjacent area afford an unusual opportunity 
for hiking, hunting, camping, and caving. 

The University of the South maintains an intercollegiate athletic 
schedule and an intramural program in all sports. The University is, 
of course, not responsible for any Injuries from participation In athletic 
sports. An Athletic Director, an instructor in Physical Education, and 
trained coaches direct the athletic sports. 

The control of Athletics is in the hands of the Athletic Board of 
Control, composed of the VIce-Chancellor, and faculty, alumni, and 
student representatives. The University Is a member of the Tennessee 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and the College Athletic Conference. 

VACCINATION 

All students are required to present upon entrance a physician's 
certificate showing a satisfactory immunization with typhoid, smallpox, 
and tetanus toxoid, either a full series or an adequate booster dose. 

It is strongly urged that immunization against poliomyelitis be 
completed or brought up to date. In addition, it is wise for each stu- 
dent, just prior to coming, to have an influenza vaccination. 

AVIATION AND MILITARY SERVICE 
The United States Air Force, in cooperation with The University 
OF THE South, maintains a Reserve Ofl^icers' Training Corps which en- 
ables qualified students to earn Air Force Reserve Commissions while 



36 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 



EXPENSES, 1964-65 

College of Arts and Sciences Each Semester 

Tuition $625.00 

*Student Activity Fee 40.00 

tinfirmary Fee 15.00 

Room 135.00 

Board 230.00 

Laundry 50.00 

Total $1,095.00 

Students taking work in science pay also the following fees: In Chemistry, a general 
fee of $8.00 per semester; in Biology, a general fee of $10.00 per semester; in Physics 
a general fee of $6.00 per semester; and, in Forestry and Engineering a general fee 
of $6.00 per the semester for laboratory courses. 

Students in the ROTC unit pay an Air Science fee of $5.00 each semester. 
A student who registers later than the day and time indicated will be required to pay 
a special fee of $15.00. In addition a student who fails to present himself for regis- 
tration will be charged $5.00 for each day he fails to register. 

School of Theology Each Semester 

Tuition $350.00 

*Student Activity Fee 40.00 

tinfirmary Fee 15.00 

Room 135.00 

Board 230.00 

Laundry 50.00 

Total $820.00 

Rent in Woodland apartments is $29.50 per month, of which $4.00 is a charge for 
water. Maintenance fee in diocesan houses and apartments is $30.00 per month; rent 
in Alston apartments and other University houses built for theological students is 
$40.00 per month. In these water is metered. 

The Clinical Training Fee, due the second semester of Junior year, is $100.00. 

Each student should plan to spend about $100.00 a semester for books and should be 
provided with Health and Accident insurance for himself and family. 

*$i.oo for subscription to "Sewanee Purple." 

tinfirmary fee and benefits applicable only to students residmg In University 
dormitories, and only when school is in session. 

Note: The University does not carry insurance on the personal belongings of stu- 
dents and therefore cannot be responsible to students for losses incurred by fire, 
water, or other damage. 

The University dormitories and student dining halls will be closed during the 
Thanksgiving recess, the Christmas Holidays, and the Spring recess. 

Semester charges do not include the cost of board and room during these periods. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 37! 

completing requirements for college degrees. Enrollment in this program 
is voluntary. All ROTC courses give full credit toward graduation. 

The University of the South Airport (Jackson-Myers Field) is on 
the domain, one mile from the campus. It is 1,950 feet above sea level 
and has one paved runway, with boundary lights, 2,800 feet long lying 
northeast and southwest. The Airport is equipped with hangar, fuel, 
oil, and unicom, and provides pilot training and air taxi services. The 
Hill Luce Memorial Building is used as the pilots' lounge and adminis- 
tration building. 

The Marine Corps offers commissions to a limited number of stu- 
dents through the Platoon Leaders Class (for freshmen, sophomores, 
and, occasionally, juniors) and the Officer Candidate Class (for seniors) 
programs. To enroll, a student must be between the ages of 17 and 
26, maintain a C average, and agree to serve on active duty for a 
minimum of three years. Members of these programs are exempt from 
induction. 

EXPENSES 

The University of the South accepts a student only for an entire 
semester. The full charges for the semeser are due and payable in 
advance upon entrance, and payment of all charges is an integral part 
cf the student's registration. Any one who prefers to pay tuition and 
fees in monthly installments, however, may apply for a Tuition Plan 
Contract. Information regarding this method of payment will be 
furnished upon request. 

It is a regulation of the University that any student whose charges 
and fees, regular or special, are not paid in full will not be allowed to 
take his semester examinations. No transcript will be issued for a 
student whose account is unpaid. 

If a student, after registration, is dismissed from the University or 
withdraws for any cause except for illness, he is not entitled to any 
refund of the sum paid to the University or to cancellation of any sum 
due and payable to the University. In the event of a student's with- 
drawal from the University by reason of illness and with the advice 
and permission of the Health Officer, he shall receive a refund of one- 
half of all charges for the period of time from his withdrawal to the 
end of the semester. A student is officially enrolled in the University 
for a semester immediately upon completion of his registration. 

If a student exercises the privilege of a charge account with one of 



38 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

the University's agencies, such as the University Supply Store or the 
Hospital, this account must be paid five days before semester examina- 
tions begin. It is customary for the student to present written au- 
thority of his parent for a charge account at the University Supply 
Store. 

The University does not charge a contingent fee. Any student 
responsible for damage to property shall pay the cost of repairs or 
replacement. All charges for damage to property become part of the 
student's account for the semester and must be paid before the se- 
mester examinations begin. A student is requested to report damage 
of property immediately to the Business Office and to ^assume respon- 
sibiHty for the cost of repairs if he is the person responsible. 

The charge for room includes, of course, cost of light, and this is 
interpreted by the University as the reasonable use of electric current 
in lamps or globes of customary size which provide the necessary 
degree or amount of light according to test and check by the Health 
Officer. The charge for room does not include current used in over- 
sized lamps, globes, electric cooking and heating appliances. The 
University charges, therefore, a fee of $2.50 a semester for each elec- 
tric cooking or heating appliance. 

Each application for admission to the College must be accompanied 
by an application fee of $10.00. This fee is not refundable, and is not 
credited to the student's account. It is designed to oifset a small por- 
tion of the expense of processing an application for admission. 

A reservation fee of $50.00 is required of all students in the College, 
This is not an extra charge; it is credited to the student's account. For 
students already registered in the University, this fee is payable by May 
I each year for the following academic year. New students must pay 
this fee by the Candidates Reply Date established by the College En- 
trance Examination Board (usually near the middle of May), or, if the 
application for admission is accepted after that date, within two weeks 
of the date of acceptance of the application. The reservation fee is not 
refundable, except in those cases in which the student is prevented from 
entering the University by serious illness, or by being drafted by the 
Selective Service. 

The student activity fee covers athletic privileges, including free 
admission to Intercollegiate events, subscriptions to Sewanee Purple, 
Cap and Gown, and Mountain Goat, and the support of student activi- 
ties in general. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 39 

A graduation fee of ^lo.oo Is charged. 

The infirmary fee covers care at Emerald-Hodgson Hospital and the 
general services of the University Health Officer while school is in 
session, but does not cover special costs such as surgery, medicine, 
X-ray plates, and the Hke. 

The laundry fee covers laundry service for the following number of 
articles each week: 6 shirts, 4 suits underwear, 6 pairs socks, i pajama 
suit, 5 handkerchiefs, 3 towels, 2 sheets, i pillowslip, i bedspread, 1 
wash cloth, i pair wash pants. For laundry in excess of this total, the 
University charges according to the cost of each article. 

All students are required to live in the University halls or in places 
approved by the University. All students are required to take their 
meals in the University dining halls. This provision does not apply, 
of course, to young men who live at home with their families in the 
vicinity of the University and who attend the College as day students. 

Each dormitory room is furnished with a single bed with mattress, 
a desk and chair, bookcase, and closet space for each student. The 
student should furnish his own pillow and bed linens, which should 
include at least 4 sheets, 4 pillow cases, 2 blankets, and 2 spreads for a 
single bed. Some form of desk lamp is also needed. 

Students in the School of Theology should provide themselves with 
a cassock and surplice. Academic gowns may be purchased after ar- 
rival at the University. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Scholarships and other forms of financial aid are available for stu- 
dents in the College of Arts and Sciences and in the School of Theology, 
Details of the financial aid program are given beginning on page 132 
for the College and page 144 for the School of Theology. 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences who are residents of 
Franklin County, Tennessee, or who are sons of Episcopal clergymen 
receive a partial remission of fees at the discretion of the Vice-Chan- 
cellor. 

THE UNIVERSITY PRESS 

The University Press is equipped to print ecclesiastical and schol- 
arly books, various journals, yearbooks, and catalogues. 

The Press publishes the regular bulletins of the University, several 
student periodicals, and The Sewanee Review, a literary quarterly 



40 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

edited by Andrew Lytic. Student publications are: The Sewanee 
Purple, a weekly newspaper; The Cap and Gown, the Sewanee annual; 
The St, Luke's Journal, a theological review; and The Mountain Goat, 
a literary and humor magazine. 

AUTOMOBILES 

Students who have earned at least Sophomore standing may own and 
operate automobiles provided their grade point average for the previous 
semester was at least 2.0. Members of the Order of Gownsmen will 
enjoy certain parking privileges which are not extended to other stu- 
dents. Freshmen may not own or operate automobiles, motorcycles, 
or motor scooters. Exceptions will be made by the Dean of Men only 
under the most compelling circumstances. Students in the School of 
Theology may own and operate automobiles. All automobiles must be 
registered with the Dean of Men. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



42 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF 
THE COLLEGE FACULTY, 1962-1963 

Faculty Committees 

'Id missions and Scholarships: Deans Lancaster, Webb; Provost Bruton; 
Mr. Ransom; Professors Turlington, Guenther, Grimes, Caldwell,. 
Yeatman. 

Committees: Professors Turlington, Whitesell, Spears; Dean Lan- 
caster. 

Curriculum: Dean Lancaster; Professors McLeod, Guenther, Webb, 
Goodstein, Pickering, Brettman. 

Degrees: Dean Lancaster; Professors Bates, Owen, Buck, Dorn 
McLeod, Spears. 

Discipline: Dean Webb; Chaplain Collins; Professors Murray, Camp,. 
Grimes. 

Honorary Degrees: Professors Degen, Pickering, Grimes. 

Sabbatical Leave: Dean Lancaster; Professors Degen, Buck, Dugan. 

Student Activities: Dean Webb; Professors Lockard, Cross, Moore,^ 
Keele. 

Administrative Committees 

Combined Engineering Plan: Professors Allen, Bates, Camp, Petry; 
Mr. Ransom. 

Pre-Medical Advisory: Professors Camp, Yeatman; Dean Webb; Mr. 
Ransom; Dr. Parsons. 

Student Placement: Dean Webb; Professors Baird, Keele. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 43 

ADMISSION 

A student wishing to seek admission to the College of Arts and 
Sciences should communicate with the Director of Admissions to obtain 
the proper application blanks and any detailed information which may 
be required. An application for admission should preferably be sub- 
mitted no later than the beginning of the applicant's last semester in 
secondary school. 

An applicant may be admitted to the College of Arts and Sciences 
directly from secondary school in either of two ways: 

1. By certificate from an accredited secondary school and the results 
of the College Entrance Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude Test. 
A certificate should show at least 15 acceptable units of credit. 

2. By examination. 

Usually, an applicant will submit a transcript of his secondary school 
work during his last year in school, giving the record of work completed 
and Indicating courses being pursued during the senior year. Condi- 
tional admission may be based upon this transcript, but final admission 
will await receipt of a transcript showing satisfactory completion of 
the secondary school course. 

The Committee on Admissions is more interested in a prospective 
student's general promise and In the quality of his work than in the 
completion of specifically required courses. But it will give preference 
to applicants who have pursued a regular college preparatory course in 
secondary school. This normally includes the following subjects: 

English, four years Foreign Language, ancient or modem, 

*Mathematics, three or four years two or more years 

History or Civics, one or more years Natural Sciences, one or more years 

•Three years of college preparatory mathematics is considered the minimum prepa- 
ration for a student to pass the required freshman mathematics course at Sewanee. 

College Entrance Examinations: 

Each applicant for admission to the College is required to take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test given by the College Entrance Examination 
Board. College Entrance Examination Board Achievement Tests will 
be required of applicants for September, 1965, In English, Mathematics 
and a foreign language. Applicants without two years of foreign 
language credit at the junior or senior high school level may substitute 
an Achievement Test in the sciences. 

College Board Examinations are given in centers throughout the 
country in December, January, February, March, May, and August 



k 



44 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH j 

each year. There is also a September administration of the examina- ; 
tion at some of the member colleges. Normally, the December, Janu- ! 
ary, February, or March test should be taken during the applicant's ; 
senior year in school. The December or January administration of the 
tests is preferred. i 

Information on College Board Examinations, and application blanks 
for the tests, may usually be obtained from the applicant's school, or 
the applicant may write to the College Entrance Examination Board, I 
Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey. (Applicants living in New Mexico, i 
Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, and states to the west of these should i 
write to the College Entrance Examination Board, P. 0. Box 27896, , 
Los Angeles 27, California). The College Board Bulletin of Informa- \ 
tion, which will be sent to all persons requesting application blanks, 
lists testing centers throughout the country and abroad. Normally, the ' 
Scholastic Aptitude Test and the achievement tests will be taken at | 
the center nearest the applicant's home or school; a special center will I 
be established for any applicant living farther than 75 miles from a 
regular testing center if application for the establishment of the special 
center is made at least five weeks before the date of the test. 

There is a small fee for the Scholastic Aptitude Test and for three i 
Achievement Tests. The appropriate fee should be returned to the 
College Entrance Examination Board with the completed application \ 
for the test, and should not be sent to The University of the South. | 

i 
Physical Examinations: ^ 

On being admitted to the College, a student will be required to file i 

a report of a physical examination and a record of his health. 

i 
Certificates : 

Certificates are accepted from secondary schools which are accredited 1 

by various regional Associations of Colleges and Secondary Schools. In i 

some instances, certificates may be accepted from schools not on these ! 

lists whose work is known and approved by the Committee on Ad- I 

missions and Scholarships. \ 

Every student who wishes to be admitted by certificate should write \ 

to the Director of Admissions for a blank form to be filled in by the | 

Principal of the school attended. I 

This certificate, signed by the Principal of the school and containing \ 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 45 

bis statement of recommendation, should normally be mailed by him to 
the Director of Admissions at as early a date as possible following the 
completion of the applicant's seventh semester of school work. Appli- 
cants with superior records who wish to request early decision on their 
applications and who have already taken the College Board Scholastic 
Aptitude Test and the three required achievement tests, may ask that 
the certificate be sent at any time after the beginning of the senior year. 
In this case, the certificate should show the applicant's record for three 
years and should contain a complete list of courses in progress. 

A blank form for the submission of a supplementary transcript at 
the end of the senior year will be sent directly to the school. 

The Early Decision Plan: 

In order to reduce the necessity for many students to file application 
at several colleges The University of the South offers an Early De- 
cision Plan. The Plan is designed for the student whose first college 
choice is The University of the South and whose secondary school 
record, test scores, recommendations, and extracurricular activities 
indicate that he is an excellent applicant. By satisfactorily fulfilling 
the admission requirements the well qualified student may receive 
favorable action on his application by November ist of his senior year. 

Procedure : 

The student applying for early decision should proceed as follows: 

1. Indicate by letter that he is applying for early decision, that The 
University of the South is his first choice, and that he will not apply 
to any other college until a decision is reached under this plan. 

2. Present all credentials necessary for admission and, if applicable, 
for financial aid (Including the Parents' Confidential Statement of the 
College Scholarship Service) to The University of the South no later 
than October 15th. If all necessary information has not been received 
by this date, the University does not guarantee a decision under the 
Early Decision Plan. 

3. Fulfill all testing requirements not later than the summer follow- 
ing the junior year. The July test date prior to the senior year Is the 
last scheduled testing of the College Entrance Examination Board 
that will assure the candidate consideration under this program. 

4. If successful, the applicant must confirm his acceptance by 
November 15th with payment of the non-returnable reservation fee 
of ^50.00. 



46 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Under this Plan The University of the South agrees to the following: 

1. To reach a decision on admission and on financial aid, if appli- 
cable, by November ist. 

2. If a definite decision of acceptance or rejection is not reached 
by November ist, the University will notify the student that his 
application will receive unbiased consideration under the regular 
admissions procedure, and that he is free to make application to other 
colleges. These students will be urged to retake the required tests 
and to submit a transcript of their first semester grades received during 
their senior year. 

3. Not to require the accepted candidate who commits himself to 
matriculate and who pays the reservation fee to take additional ad- 
missions tests. 

All inquiries in regard to the Early Decision Plan should be directed 
to the Director of Admissions, The Universit^ of the South, Sewanee, 
Tennessee. 

Admission by Examination: 

Students desiring to take, or required to take, entrance examinations 
to satisfy the requirements for admission should communicate with the 
Director of Admissions as early as possible before the date of entrance. 
Preferably, this should be in the fall or early winter preceding the date 
of entrance. 

Advanced Placement: 

Advanced placement may be granted to entering students who, in 
certain courses, pass the College Entrance Examination Board Ad- 
vanced Placement Tests. This advanced placement must have the ap- 
proval of the chairmen of the departments concerned. In some in- 
stances, college credit may accompany advanced placement; see page 51. 

Advanced Standing: 

Students coming from other colleges which are members of their 
regional educational associations should show detailed evidence of the 
work done there in the form of official transcripts from all colleges at- 
tended. On the basis of this evidence, or on the evidence of examina- 
tions, transfer credit will be granted at the discretion of the Faculty 
Committee on Degrees. Normally, credit is granted in all work of a 
liberal nature in which the student has made a grade of C or better. 
Students transferring from other institutions must meet, upon entrance, 
the requirements demanded of our own students. Since the College 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 4/ 

requires two years of residence for a degree, no transfer student may 
be admitted into the senior year as a candidate for a degree. 

ROOM ASSIGNMENTS 
Rooms are assigned by the Dean of Men. Priority in the selection 
of rooms is given to students already in the College; the current occu- 
pant of a room has priority in the choice of that room. Students 
entering the College are invited to express choice of rooms or dormi- 
tories, and to express preference for a roommate, though no assurance 
can be given that such requests can be granted. An upperclassman 
who has not paid his reservation fee for the following year by the 
ilesignated date forfeits all priority in the selection of a room. Where 
all other considerations are equal, preference will be given in the as- 
signment of rooms to those applications bearing the earliest date. 

THE ACADEMIC YEAR 

The regular session of the College of Arts and Sciences is divided 
into two semesters. A summer session of eight weeks is also offered. 

The first semester for the session of 1964-65 will begin on September 
13 and end on January 30. The second semester will begin on Febru- 
ary 2 and end on June 6. The summer term of 1964 begins on June 
22 and ends on August 15. 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

All students are expected to register at the prescribed time at the 
beginning of each semester. A student who registers later than the day 
indicated in the University Calendar will be required to pay a special 
fee of $15.00. In addition, a resident student who fails to present him- 
self for registration will be charged $5.00 for each day he fails to 
register. 

A student who withdraws from the College without notifying the 
Dean of the College will not be entitled to honorable dismissal. This 
applies to a student who withdraws between the two semesters of a 
single academic year, as well as to one who withdraws during a se- 
mester. 

ADVISING SYSTEM 
Shortly after registration, each student is assigned by the Dean of 
Men to a faculty adviser who has general supervision of his college 
course and to whom the student may refer any academic or personal 



48 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

problems. Each week-day afternoon an academic counselor is on duty 
for consultation. 

THE GRADING SYSTEM AND STUDENT CLASSIFICATION 

The work of students in College courses is graded according to the 
following system: the grade A means excellent; B, good; C, average; 
D, passing; F, failing; I, incomplete. 

The grade I is given only when a student fails to complete the work 
of a course for legitimate and unavoidable reasons. 

Averages are computed in grade points. Each semester hour of 
academic credit with the grade A carries with it four grade points; each 
hour with the grade B, three grade points; each hour with the grade 
C, two grade points; each hour with the grade D, one grade point. 

Class standing and eligibility for graduation are determined by the 
number of semester hours and the number of quality credits a student 
has earned. Each semester hour with the grade A carries with it three 
quality credits; each hour with the grade B, two quality credits; each 
hour with the grade C, one quality credit. 

A Freshman is a student who has fewer than 24 hours of credit or 
fewer than 18 quality credits. 

A Sophomore has at least 24 hours and at least 18 quality credits. 

A Junior has at least 60 hours and at least 54 quality credits. 

A Senior has at least 92 hours and at least 86 quality credits. 

A Special Student is one who by permission of the Dean of the Col- 
lege is admitted to certain courses without being required to present 
the full entrance requirements or to carry the number of courses pre- 
scribed for regular students. Only students twenty-one years old or 
older may be admitted as special students. Work done by a special 
student will not count toward a degree unless such a student is accorded 
regular standing. 

MEMBERSHIP IN THE ORDER OF GOWNSMEN 

Membership in the Order of Gownsmen is extended to Sophomore 
students with a grade point average of 3.0 based on two semesters of 
college work who have satisfied two semesters of the physical education 
requirement and who are not deficient in Chapel attendance. 

Membership in the Order is extended to Juniors at the end of any 
semester in which a Junior student earns a grade point average of 2.25 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 49 

provided he has satisfied the physical education requirement and is 
not deficient in Chapel attendance. 

Membership in the Order is extended to Senior students at the end 
of any semester in which a Senior student earns a grade point average 
of 2.0 provided he has satisfied the physical education requirement 
and is not deficient in Chapel attendance. 

Subject to faculty regulation, voluntary class attendance is a privilege 
of membership in the Order of Gownsmen. 

Consistent with the interest of the University and the principle of 
responsibility, members of the Order are required to attend Daily 
Chapel 30 times a semester and Sunday Chapel 6 times during a 
semester. 

Membership in the Order, with its privileges, shall be revoked by the 
Dean of the College at the end of any semester in which a member falls 
below the grade point average required for membership. 

Membership in the Order may be revoked upon the recommendation 
of the Dean of Men or the Discipline Committee of the College 
Faculty for any disciplinary infraction reflecting upon the principle of 
responsibility upon which the Order rests. 

Gownsmen are permitted to hold four morning meetings during a 
semester, each meeting to be held at a different hour. Members 
of the Order shall be excused from classes to attend these meetings. 

Completion of the Physical Education requirement shall not be 
prerequisite to membership in the Order of Gownsmen for students 
transferring from schools with no comparable requirement. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

All students except first-semester Freshmen will be required to pass 
three courses each semester, each course carrying three or more hours 
of semester credit. A first-semester Freshman will be required to pass 
two courses, each course carrying three or more hours' credit. A student 
whose only previous college experience is a single summer-school term 
will be considered a first-semester Freshman. Students with more 
college experience, regardless of the number of credits earned, will not 
be considered first-semester Freshmen. 

A first-year Freshman will be required to pass not fewer than 
eighteen semester hours and accumulate not fewer than twelve quality 
credits, for the academic year, to be eligible to re-enroll the following 
yean 



50 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

A second-year student will be required to pass not fewer than twenty- 
four semester hours and to have accumulated not fewer than thirty 
quality credits, for the academic year, to be eligible to re-^enroU the 
following year. 

A third-year student will be required to pass not fewer than twenty- 
four semester hours and to have accumulated not fewer than sixty 
quality credits, for the academic year, to be eligible to re-enroll the 
following year. 

A fourth-year student will be required to pass not fewer than twenty- 
four semester hours and to have accumulated not fewer than one hun- 
dred quality credits, for the academic year, to be eligible to re-enroll. 
Semester hours and quality credits earned in summer school are con- 
sidered as having been earned during the preceding academic year. 

Students who fail to meet these requirements will be suspended for 
one semester. If, after a period of suspension, a student makes formal 
application and is re-admitted, he will be required either to earn not 
fewer than twenty-five quality credits a year or to meet the standard 
for each stage of academic residence. A student who has, for academic 
reasons, been suspended for a semester may apply for re-admission 
after the end of the semester of suspension. 

DEGREES 

In the College of Arts and Sciences, the degrees of Bachelor of Arts 
and Bachelor of Science in Forestry are conferred. 

Applications for Degrees 
All candidates for degrees must announce their candidacy to the 
Dean of the College early in their seventh semester. No student who 
fails to make this application at the time designated will be recom- 
mended for a degree. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF 
ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FORESTRY 

A minimum of 128 semester hours and 120 quality credits is required 
for either the degree of Bachelor of Arts or the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Forestry. In order to qualify for a degree, a student must 
meet the requirements as prescribed here. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 5 1 

I. Prescribed Courses 

1. For the degree of Bachelor of Arts: 

(a) A year-course In mathematics. 

(b) Two semesters of laboratory courses in Chemistry, Physics, or Biology. 

(c) English I0I-I02. 

(d) Two semester courses In Philosophy or in Religion. 

(e) Completion of one language through the third year level or two languages 
through the second year level. 

(f) History 101-102. 

(g) Economics loi and a semester of Political Science, or two semesters In either 
Economics or Political Science. 

(h) Four semesters of Air Science or Physical Education. 
(i) Completion of Chapel attendance requirements. 

2. For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry the same courses are prescribed 
as for the Bachelor of Arts degree except that the language requirement may be 
fulfilled by the completion of one language through the second year level. 

Notes: i. It Is possible to satisfy any required course by examination. 

2. The level of language proficiency Is usually determined by the use of an achieve- 
ment test. 

3. A mmimum of two years in residence, including the final year, Is required of all 
those upon whom degrees may be conferred. 

II. The Major Subject 

1. At or before the end of his Sophomore year, a student will select a major sub- 
ject. Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts may major In any one of the 
following departments: English, Philosophy, Classical Languages, Biology, Chemistry, 
Fine Arts, Forestry, French, German, Spanish, History, Economics, Political Science, 
Mathematics, Physics, and Religion. Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Forestry will major in Forestry. 

2. To be accepted as a major m one of these departments a candidate must have 
maintained at least a C average in the courses already taken In the subject. If, at 
the end of the Sophomore year, a student in good standing in the College Is not 
qualified to major in the subject he chooses, he may be permitted to register for an 
additional year in the College; but, if, at the end of the additional year, he Is still 
unqualified, he will not be permitted to register again. 

3. A major shall consist of not more than 42 semester hours in a department. 

4. Every candidate for a degree must take a comprehensive examination In his 
major subject. To be eligible for the comprehensive examination, he must have 
maintained at least a C average in his major courses. A student may not take a 
comprehensive examination unless he has been accepted as a major In the department 
not later than the begmning of the semester previous to the semester In which he 
takes the comprehensive examination. 

III. Credit by Examination 

I. College credit may be granted on the basis of the College Entrance Examination 
Board A^dvanced Placement Tests subject to the following conditions: 
(a) A grade of 3 or better is required. 



52 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

(b) Credit is awarded at the discretion of the chairman of the department con- 
cerned after examination of the test and paper and consultation with the Dean 
of the College and/or the Degrees Committee. 

(c) Credit granted in a foreign language may not exceed six semester hours; crolit 
may not be awarded in a foreign student's native language. 

(d) Credit in non-language courses may be granted In the course tested only if it 
k recognized by The University of the South. 

IV. Degrees With Honors 

A student who has fulfilled the degree requirements with a general grade point 
average of 3.75 and honors on his comprehensive examinations will receive his degree 
Summa Cum Laude. A student with a general grade point average of 3.5 and honors 
on his comprehensive examinations will receive his degree Magna Cum Laude. A 
student with a grade-point average of 3.0, with or without honors on his comprehensive 
examinations, will receive his degree Cum Laude. 



ENGINEERING 

There has been concern among our nation's educators and industrial 
leaders over the limited number of courses provided in liberal arts in 
the four-year curriculum offered by technical schools to students in 
various branches of engineering. 

With the hope of broadening the engineering student's outlook and 
educational background, The University of the South has entered 
into agreement with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Columbia Uni- 
versity, and the Georgia Institute of Technology for' the cooperative 
education of students in engineering. Under these plans, the student 
will attend The University of the South for three years, during 
which time he will take courses in the humanities and the social 
sciences while obtaining an adequate foundation in mathematics, phys- 
ics, and chemistry. At the end of his third year at Sewanee, if he has 
met the course requirements and has maintained a satisfactory overall 
average, he will transfer to the engineering school of his choice, where 
he will concentrate in his chosen field of engineering for two years. 

At the end of the combined five-year course, the student will receive 
from Sewanee the degree of Bachelor of Arts while at the same time 
receiving an appropriate degree in engineering from the engineering 
school. 

Since Rensselaer and the Georgia Institute of Technology also have 
Air Force ROTC programs, the student may continue participation in 
the ROTC unit at these institutions and receive his commission as a 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



53 



Second Lieutenant In the Air Force at the same time that he receives 
the two degrees. 

A student who wishes to follow the Combined Engineering Plan 
should state his intention before registering for his freshman year at 
Sewanee and should select the following schedule; 

Thiw) Year 

Economics or Pol. Science 

Philosophy or Religion 

French or German 

Mechanics 

Engineering Drawing and 

Descriptive Geometry- 
Elective 
(Air Science 301-302) 

Students preparing for Chemical Engineering will take two or three 
years of Chemistry and one or two years of Physics. 



FmsT Year 
English 101-102 
History 101-102 
French or German 
Mathematics 101-102 
Physics 101-102 
(Air Science 101-102) 



Second Year 
English 201-202 
Chemistry 101-102 
French or German 
Mathematics 201-202 
Advanced Physics 
(Air Science 201-202) 



PRE-MEDICAL CURRICULUM 
A student who plans to enter medical school will have opportunities 
to consult with the Faculty Pre-Medical Advisory Committee from 
the beginning of his Freshman year. The Committee has drawn up 
several different curricula providing for a major in Biology, in Chem- 
istry, or in other fields. Each student will be advised according to his 
individual aptitude and need. 



54 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION 



AIR SCIENCE 

Professor Murray, Major, USAF 

Assistant Professor Campbell, Major, USAF 

Assistant Professor Kepley, Capt., USAF 

General Information: 

The Department of Air Science is the academic department estab- 
lished by the University and the United States Air Force to administer 
and teach the courses prescribed by the Air Force Reserve Officerls' 
Training Corps program. This program enables qualified undergradu- 
ates to earn reserve commissions as second lieutenants in the U. S. 
Air Force while completing baccalaureate degree requirements. All 
PvOTC courses give full credit toward graduation. The four-year pro- 
gram gives a total of 17 hours of credit. 

Participation in Air Force ROTC is voluntary, but students enrolling 
should do so with the awareness that they will be expected to conform 
to all requirements of this military training. 

The purpose and objectives of the department are: (i) To select and 
motivate cadets to serve as career Air Force officers In fields specifi- 
cally required by the United States Air Force; (2) To develop in cadets 
by precept, example, and participation the attributes of character and 
personality that are essential for leadership; (3) To develop in cadets 
an interest in, and understanding of, the Air Force mission, organiza- 
tion, operation, problems, and techniques; (4) To provide the military 
education and training that will give cadets a general background and 
sound foundation on which to build an officer's career. 

The chairman of the department is an Air Force officer who is desig- 
nated by the University, in coordination with the United States Air 
Force, as Professor of Air Science. He is also Commander of the Air 
Force ROTC Detachment. The officers and airmen on his staff are 
members of the United States Air Force. 

Air Force ROTC provides a four-year curriculum divided Into the 
Basic Course (Freshman and Sophomore years) and the Advanced 
Course (Junior and Senior years). Enrollment In this program is 
voluntary, but, once a student enters either the Basic Course or the 
Advanced Course, then tliat course becomes a requirement for gradu- 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 55 

ation (unless the student is eliminated for cause or for some reason 
over which he has no control). 

To be eligible for the Basic Course (Freshman and Sophomore 
years) the student must: 

1. Be unconditionally admitted and enrolled as a full-time student. 

2. Be at least 14 years of age at the time of initial enrollment and 
must be able to complete degree and commissioning requirements 
before his 28th birthday. 

3. Be a male citizen of the United States. 

4. Meet minimum physical qualifications. 

To be eligible for the Advanced Course (Junior and Senior Years) 
the student must: 

1. Have successfully completed the requirements of the Basic Course. 

2. Be able to complete degree and commissioning requirements be- 
fore his 28th birthday. 

3. Be physically qualified. 

4. Be aptitudinally qualified. (All students entering the Advanced 
Course must have achieved minimum qualifying scores on the Air 
Force Officers' Qualification Test.) 

5. Have two academic years remaining prior to graduation and have 
Junior student status in the University. 

6. Be selected by the Vice-Chancellor and the Professor of Air 
Science. 

7. Sign a contract and agreement with the Government agreeing to 
complete the Advanced Course, including the AFROTC Summer 
Training Unit, to accept a reserve commission (if tendered) upon 
graduation and course completion, and to serve the prescribed 
period of active duty in the Air Force inherent in his obligation 
as a reserve officer commissioned through AFROTC. 

Air Force Summer Training Unit: 

The Advanced Course (Junior and Senior Years) includes a four- 
weeks' summer period of intensive training which makes practical ap- 
plication of the cadet's general knowledge acquired in Air Science 
courses, and includes familiarization flights with practice in the routine 
procedures of flight planning. This camp is normally attended after the 
first year of the Advanced Course. The Government pays transportation 
to and from the Summer Training Unit, provides free uniforms, housing. 



56 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

and food, and pays each cadet $2.60 per day during the Summer Train- 
ing period. 

Uniforms, Equipment, and Emoluments: 

All cadets are furnished complete Air Force unitorms and ROTC 
textbooks free. Initial uniform alterations are at government expense; 
cadets are required, however, to keep uniforms in their possession clean 
and neat at their expense. Government equipment lost or damaged is 
charged to the cadet. Cadets under contract in the Advanced CoursiB 
are paid approximately $2^ per month by the government. The total 
compensation, including the amount paid at the Summer Training Unit, 
that each contract cadet receives during his Junior and Senior years is 
approximately ^$640. 

Deferment from Selective Service Induction: 

National Selective Service laws provide a quota for deferment from 
induction into the armed services each year to the Air Force ROTC 
basic course. All advanced course cadets are deferred from induction. 
Basic course cadets are selected for deferment within this quota on the 
basis of relative standing with other cadets. Relative standing is de- 
termined by academic grades and military qualifications. Deferred 
cadets are exempt from induction so long as they remain in good stand- 
ing in the ROTC program and the University. 

Course Requirements: 

Certain selected courses in other departments of the University are 
required as a part of the Air Science curriculum. Freshmen must enroll 
in and satisfactorily complete History loi. Sophomores must, during 
their second semester, complete a specific course to be designated by 
the Professor of Air Science. This course will be in addition to the 
Air Science curriculum. 

BASIC COURSE (Freshman and Sophomore Years) 

101. Leadership Training Class. 

One hour. (Credit, one hour). Enrollment in History loi. 

102. Air Science 1 — Fundamentals of Aerospace Power Weapons Systems. 

An introduction into the development of aerial warfare, with emphasis on principles 
of war, concepts of employment of forces, changing weapons systems, and operations In 
space. Lectures, two hours; Leadership Training Class, one hour. (Credit, two hours). 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 57 

201. Air Science 2 — Foundations of Aerospace Power. 

An introduction to the constituent elements of aerospace power, the organization and 
operation of the military arm of the Federal Government, the concepts of limited 
war, insurgency and counter-insurgency, and an evaluation of the professional officer in 
the United States Air Force. Lectures, two hours; Leadership Training Class, one 
hour. (Credit, two hours). 

202. Leadership Training Qass. 

One hour. (Credit, one hour). 



ADVANCED COURSE (Junior and Senior Years) 

300. Growth and Development of Aerospace Power. 

A two semester course concerning the nature of war; development of airpower m 
the United States; mission and organization of the Defense Department; Air Force 
concepts, doctrine, and employment; astronautics and space operations, and the 
future development of aerospace power. Includes the United States space programs, 
vehicles, systems, and problems in space exploration. Three class hours per week, 
one hour of supervised research, and one hour of leadership laboratory. (Credit, three 
hours each semester). 

402-403. Air Science 3 — Air Officer Development. 

A two semester course concerning the knowledge and skills required of a junior 
officer in the Air Force, with special emphasis on staff duties and leadership. Includes 
Air Force staflF organization and functions; communicating, instructing, and problem 
solving techniques; a study of the biological, psychological, and philosophical bases 
behind the principles and practices of leadership used in the Air Force; and a survey 
of the military justice system. Lectures, four hours; Leadership Laboratory, one hour. 
(Credit, three hours each semester). 



BIOLOGY 

Professor Owen 

Professor Yeatman 

Associate Professor Foreman 

Assistant Professor Ramseur 

The Department of Biology requires 28 semester hours plus a mini- 
mum of 2 semester hours of Seminar for a major. Additional require- 
ments are: i year of Chemistry; i year of Physics; 2 years of Mathe- 
matics (2 years of AFROTC may be substituted for i year of Mathe- 
matics). The foreign language requirement for the B.A. degree may 
be satisfied by completing 3 years of German or 3 years of French but 
it is recommended that a student have two year-courses in each of 
these languages. 



58 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

For a first-year student who plans to major in Biology, the following 
curriculum is recommended: 

Chemistry 101-102 History 101-102 

Mathematics 101-102 English 101-102 

German or French 101-102 AFROTC or Physical Education 

Biology 101-102 is prerequisite for all other courses in Biology. 

101-102. General Biology 

(loi: Zoology; 102: Botany). A study of the basic facts and principles of animal 
and plant biology. The laboratory is designed to illustrate the principles of biology 
and to familiarize the students with the structure and function of animals and plants. 
Credit for the semesters separately will be granted only to students who have met 
the basic requirements in Science. (Credit, eight hours). Staflf. 

201. Embryology. 

A detailed study of the development stages in Amphioxus, the frog, the chick, the 
pig, and the human. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four 
hours). Mr. Yeatman. 

202. Invertebrate Zoology. 

A detailed study of the classification, morphology, and function of free-living 
representatives of all the phyla, exclusive of the insects. Lectures, three hours; labora- 
tory, three hours. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Yeatman. 

203. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. 

A comparative study, by systems, of provertebrate chordates and the vertebrates. 
Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Yeatman. 

204. Parasitology. 

An introduction to animal parasites, covering the morphology, distribution, and 
extent of parasitism, with particular emphasis on the host-parasite relationship. 
Lectures, two hours; laboratory, four hours. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, 
four hours). Mr. Owen. 

205. Systematic Botany. 

A study of ferns and seed plants, including the collection and identification of 
representative plants. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four 
hours). Mr. Ramseur. 

206. Plant Ecology. 

A study of the relation of plants to their environment, with emphasis on climatic 
and soil factors which influence their structure and distribution. Lectures, three 
hours; laboratory, three hours. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, four hours). 
Mr. Ramseur. 

301. Genetics. 

The course consists of a study of the principles of heredity of plants and animals 
Lectures, three hours. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Owen. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 59 

302. Histology and Microscopical Technique. 

A study of animal tissues; preparation and study of microscopical slides. Lectures, 
two hours; laboratory, four hours. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Yeatman. 

303. Evolution. 

A general study of organic evolution, including the history of the theories of evolu- 
tion, evidences of evolution, and theories of the mechanisms involved. Lectures, three 
hours. 1963-1964 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Owen. 

305. Plant Physiology. 

An introductory study of the basic physiological processes of plants. Lectures, 
three hours; laboratory, three hours. 1963-1964 and alternate years. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 101-102. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Ramseur. 

307-308 and 309-310. Biology Seminar. 

A weekly meeting of the staflF with Biology majors. Current literature and 
assigned topics are reviewed and discussed. Required of Biology majors. (Credit, 
one hour each semester). Staff. 

311. Genetics Laboratory, 

Offered concurrently with Biology 301. A study of heredity as Illustrated by 
Drosophila. Laboratory, three hours. (Credit, one hour). Mr. Owen. 

316. Philosophy of Science. 

An examination of the assumptions underlying scientific discourse and of the 
meanings of scientific conclusions. (Credit, one hour). Mr. McCrady. 

320. Vertebrate Physiology. 

A survey of functional aspects of the vertebrate body Including a comparative study 
of hemostatic processes. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 101-102, Physics 101-102, Chemistry 203-204 (may be taken concurrently). 
Exceptional students may be permitted to take the course without all the pre- 
requisites. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Foreman. 

401-402. Honors Course. 

Open to advanced students who have an average of B or better and show special 
aptitude for Independent work. The number of credit hours Is determined by the 
Department. Staff. 

411. Radioisotope Techniques. 

Offered jointly with the Department of Chemistry. Lectures, two hours; laboratory, 
four hours. Approval of instructor required. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Ov/en. 



CHEMISTRY 

Professor Camp 

Associate Professor Guenther 

Assistant Professor Dorn 

Sewanee is one of the few small liberal arts colleges that offer aiii 



60 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOXTTH 

undergraduate program in chemistry that is approved by the Committee 
on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society. All stu- 
dents who plan to become professional chemists are advised to complete 
this program, in addition to the minimum requirements for a depart- 
mental major. Such students should discuss their curriculum plans with 
the chemistry staff during their first year in college. 

Minimum Major Requirements: Chemistry 101-102, 203-204, 211- 
212, 303-304, 405, 409-410; Mathematics 201-202; Physics 101-102. 

Requirements for a degree accredited by The American Chemical 
Society (in addition to minimum requirements listed above): (i) both 
French 201-202 and German 201-202; (2) two semesters of either 
mathematics beyond Mathematics 202 or physics beyond Physics 102; 
Chemistry 401, plus six more hours of advanced chemistry. 

French or German is the foreign language that a prospective chemis- 
try major should take his Freshman year. 

Chemistry 101-102 is a prerequisite for all other courses in chemistry. 



101-102. General Chemistry. r 

An elementary study of the composition and structure of matter. Relationship j 

and distinction between experimental data and theoretical concepts are stressed. The j 

systematic qualitative analysis of inorganic material by the semimicro method is j 

studied in the laboratory during the second semester. Lectures, three hours; laboratory | 

three hours. (Credit, four hours each semester). Staff. j 

i 

203-204. Organic Chemistry. | 

A study of the nomenclature and the properties of the most important classes of "'■ 
organic compounds and the use of electronic concepts of molecular structure and ■ 
chemical bonding. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four j 
hours each semester). Mr. Camp. j 

.! 

211-212. Quantitative Chemistry. { 

This is a study of quantitative chemical measurements and their interpretation. 
The course combines the material of classical quantitative analysis and relevant topics I 
in the physical chemistry of solutions and gases. Lectures, two hours; laboratory, six I 
hours. (Credit, four hours each semester). Mr. Guenther. "I 

303-304. Physical Chemistry. 

First semester: Thermodynamic and kinetic Interpretation of some properties of j 

matter. Second semester: Electrochemistry, atomic and molecular structure, reaction j 

kinetics. Prerequisites: Chemistry 212, Mathematics 201-202, Physics 101-102. j 

Permission may be given to exceptional students to take the course without all the j 

prerequisites. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours 1 

each semester). Mr. Dom. ' 



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 6l 

401. Qualitative Organic Analysis. 

The purification and identification of organic compounds, together with problem 
solving and the use of the library in work related to the laboratory assignments. 
Conference, one hour; laboratory, six hours. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Camp. 

402. Advanced Organic Chemistry. 

An intensive study of a few selected topics In organic chemistry. (Credit, two 
hours). Given 1963-1964 and alternate years. Mr. Camp. 

403. Inorganic Chemistry. 

Application of concepts of electronic configuration to interpretation of physical and 
chemical properties of Inorganic materials. Emphasis Is given to spectra and crystal 
field theory of transition metal compounds; two hours of credit. Designed for juniors 
also taking Chemistry 212 concurrently. (Credit, two or three hours). Mr. Guenther. 

404. Advanced Laboratory. 

Advanced laboratory problems In a field of chemistry of special Interest to the 
mdividual student. Credit to be determined by the staff. 

405. History of Science. 

A reading course required of all Chemistry majors. After consultation with a 
member of the Chemistry faculty, the student must (not later than April 30th of his 
junior year) submit a bibliography of references he plans to use and an outline of 
subject matter to be read. A written and oral examination must be passed, not later 
than one week after registration in the fall of his senior year, (Credit, one hour). Staff. 

409-410. Seminar and Honors Course. 

Open to majors — all seniors must participate In the weekly seminar for one hour 
credit per semester. Additional work may be elected in a research project with one 
of the staff. Credit to be determined by the staff. 

411. Radioisotope Techniques and Chemical Instrumentation. 

Given in cooperation with the Department of Biology. The major part of this 
course is devoted to a study of the applications of radioisotopes to chemical problems. 
During the latter third of the course, the principles and applications of selected 
chemical Instruments are studied. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. 
(Credit, four hours). Mr. Dorn. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 
Professor Cheston 

101. Engineering Drawing. 

The use of drafting Instruments, and Introductory work In freehand lettering; 
the principles of orthographic projection, of dimensioning, of Isometric projection, of 
oblique projections, and of perspective. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, two hours. 
(Credit, two hours). 



62 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

102. Plane Surveying. 

The use of surveying instruments; plane-table surveying and mapping; use of 
the level and of telescopic alidade; transit surveying, and mapping from a transit 
survey; topographic mapping. Lectures, two hours; laboratory and field work, six 
hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 101-102 and Civil Engineering loi. (Credit, 
four hours). 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

Professor Turlington 

Professor J. H. W. Rhys 

*Mr. Binnicker 

Mr. Carleton 

The departmental requirements for a major in Classical Languages 
will be arranged in consultation with the Department Head. Students 
contemplating such a major are advised that this University is a con- 
tributing member of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens 
and of the American Academy in Rome. 

A student accepted as a major in this Department will, at the end of 
his Sophomore year, be assigned a list of books and articles, including 
ancient authors and modern works bearing on the languages, litera- 
tures, and civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome. Part of the 
comprehensive examination will be based on these. 

Of the courses listed below, Greek 101-102, 201-202 and Latin loi- 
102, 201-202 are offered every year. All other courses are offered ap- 
proximately every alternate year. 

Classical Studies 
No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required for the following five 
courses. None of them can be used to satisfy any part of the foreign 
language requirement. 

101. Classical Mythology. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Binnicker. 

104. Our Classical Heritage. 

Greek and Roman ideals and Institutions which have influence and continue to be 
basic in contemporary American civilization. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Turlington. 



^On leave 1963-1964. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 63 

201. Classical Etymology in English. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Turlington. 

204. Classical Literature in Translation. 

Selections from Greek and Latin literature m English translation. (Credit, tliree 
hours). Mr. Binnlcker. 

206. Greek Athletics. 

Athletics in Homer, the Olympic and other games of the Greeks, their gymnastics, 
their concept of athletics, and its place in Greek education. One hour of lecture 
and one hour of laboratory each week. In addition to the credit given for this course, 
attendance at both lecture and laboratory can be used to satisfy two of the three weekly 
periods required for credit In Physical Education. (Credit, one hour). Staff. 

207. Classical Archaeology. 

A study of selected sites of importance in the life and culture of classical antiquity, 
preceded by a review of four pre^classical civilizations, including the Trojan, Cretan, 
and Mycenaean. Discussion is supplemented by use of slides and artifacts. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Rhys. 



Greek 



101-102. Beginning Greek. 

(Credit, six hours). Mr. Binnlcker. 



201-202. Plato's Socratic Dialogues. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 

301-302. Homer. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

303-304. Greek Historians. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 

305-306. Greek Lyric Poets. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 

307-308. Greek Orators. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Rhys. 

311. Greek Prose Composition. 

Required of concentrators In Greek; open to other qualified students. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Turlington. 

401-402. Greek Tragedy. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

403. Greek Comedy. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Turlington. 



64 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

411-412. Introduction to Linguistics. 

Required of majors in Greek; open to other students accepted by the instructor. 
(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 



Latin 

101-102. Beginning Latin. 

(Credit, six hours). Mr. Turlington. 

201. Cicero. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Carleton. 

202. Virgil. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Carleton. 

301-302. Latin Historians. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlmgton. 

303-304. The Lyric Poets. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). StaflF. 

305. Elegiac Poets. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Binnlcker. 

306. Roman Satire. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Binnlcker. 

311. Latin Prose Composition. 

Required of concentrators in Latin; open to other qualified students. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Binnlcker. J 

401-402. Roman Drama. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 

404. Orations of Cicero. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Turlington. 

405. Medieval Latin. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Binnlcker. 

411-412. Introduction to Linguistics. 

Required of majors m Latin; open to other students accepted by the instructor. , 
(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. I 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 65 

ECONOMICS 

Professor Thorogood 

Associate Professor Degen 

Associate Professor Goodstein 

This Department seeks to provide for students interested in under- 
standing our economic society — its background and fundamental prin- 
ciples, its problems and trends, its public and private economic institu- 
tions. 

Students majoring in this Department are generally preparing for 
graduate work in economics or business administration, for govern- 
ment service, for law, or for a career in business. 

A minimum of ii semester courses, or 33 semester hours, exclusive of 
Business Law, is normally required of a major in this Department. 
Four courses are prescribed for all majors: Economics loi, 305, 401, 
and either 301 or 306. Other courses are recommended on the basis 
of the student's individual interests and future plans. Economics loi 
is normally prerequisite to all other courses, but in exceptional cases, 
with the permission of the Chairman, other courses may be taken 
concurrently. 

All majors in this Department are required to pass a written com- 
prehensive examination. Candidates for honors in Economics are re- 
quired to take the Graduate Record Examination as part of their 
written comprehensive examination. In addition to the written com- 
prehensive examination, an oral examination will be given to candidates 
for honors in Economics. 

Students may satisfy the social science degree requirement by taking 
Economics loi plus one 300 level course in Economics, or by taking 
Economics loi and a semester of Political Science. 

101. Introduction to Economics. 

Essential concepts for understanding modern economic activity and etonomic issues 
involving public policy. (Credit, three hours). Staff. 

211. Elementary Statistics. 

An introduction to the theory and procedures pertaining to the reduction of data, 
statistical inference, the association of variables, index numbers, and time series. Also 
listed as Mathematics 211. (Credit, four hours). 

212. Fundamentals of Accounting. 

The conceptual nature and general procedures of business accounting; transactions, 
accounts, the balance sheet, and the income statement; the accounting cycle. The 



66 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

application of accounting principles to social accounting and economic analysis. 
(Credit, three hours). StaflF. 

213. Business Law. 

The main principles of business law: Contracts, bailments, negotiable instruments, 
common carriers, insurance, sales, wills, nature of legal remedies. How and when to 
seek legal advice. Also listed as Political Science 213. (Credit, three hours). Mr. 
Lancaster. 

SOL Money and Banking. 

Historical and analytical study of the American monetary and banking system, "wath 
particular attention to monetary standards, commercial banking, the Federal Reserve 
System, and monetary theory. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Degen. 

304. Labor Economics. 

History of the American labor movement; labor-management relations; the labor 
market; the problem of unemployment; governmental policies and laws affectmg 
labor. Current issues are emphasized. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Degen. 

305. Microeconomic Theory. 

The study of household, firm, and Industry behavior and the conditions of equilibrium 
in output and input markets and in the economy as a whole. (Credit, three hours). 
Mr. Goodstein. 

306. Macroeconomic Theory. 

The study of cyclical and non-cyclical aspects of employment, output, economic 
growth, and the price level from the viewpoints of economic theory and public 
policy. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Goodstein. 

315. Industrial Organization. 

The study of alternative mdustrial structures, their determinants, and their impatt 
upon the attainment of the efficient allocation of resources, progress, stability, and 
equity in the economy. An Introductory survey of the current public policy toward 
the structure and behavior of industry. Prerequisite: Economics 305. (Credit, 
three hours). 

321. American Economic History: The Character of Economic Growth. 

A historical study of the character of American economic growth in terms of the 
natural wealth, human wealth, capital, enterprise, and markets contributing to it. 
Also listed as History 321. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Goodstein. 

322. American Economic History: The Implications of Economic Growth. 

A historical study of the Implications of American economic growth as regards 
economic fluctuations, the business society, condition of the people, natural wealth, 
international economic relations, and the role of government In the economy. Also 
listed as History 322. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Goodstein. 

331. Public Finance and Taxation. 

Federal, state, and local tax systems in the United States. Purposes and effects 






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES (i'] 

of governmental expenditures. Budgets, debts, fiscal policy. Problems in income, 
corporate, estate, and property taxation. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Thorogood. 

332. Business Organization and Finance. 

Study of business organizations, especially the corporation, from the viewpoint of 
management, investors, and public. Problems of promotion, financing, expansion. 
Failure and reorganization. Stock markets; investment bankmg; security regulation. 
Investment principles. Cooperatives and government-owned corporations. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Thorogood. 

337. International Economics. 

Historical, institutional, and theoretical study of international trade, finance, and 
the role of government in international economic relations. The position of the United 
States in the world economy is examined. International economic institutions, such 
as the International Monetary Fund, are analyzed. (Credit, three hours). Mr. 
Degen. 

340. Introduction to Mathematical Economics. 

The mathematical formulation of economic theory and a study of selected topics 
in economics drawn from among linear programming, input-output analysis, general 
equilibrium analysis, growth models, and econometrics. Prerequisite: Economics 
305. (Credit, three hours). 

401. History of Economic Thought. 

A study of the principal schools of economic thought and their development and 
inter-relationship. Medieval, Mercantilistic, Physiocratic, Classical, Utopian, Social- 
ist, Neo-Classical, and Keynesian Schools; a brief consideration of other miscellaneous 
schools of thought. Emphasis on Adam Smith, Ricardo, Malthus, J. S. Mill, Marx, 
Marshall, and Keynes. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Thorogood. 

404. Seminar in Economic Development. 

A study of the revoluntary changes taking place in the underiieveloped areas of the 
world. Considers theories, policies, and problems of accelerating economic growth 
in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Economic, historical, political, and social factors 
are covered. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Degen. 

450-451. Tutorials. 

Advanced work for selected students. Three hours credit for a tutorial in a given 
area of study. Staff. 



68 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

ENGLISH 

Professor Harrison 

Professor Spears 

Professor Moore 

Associate Professor Martin 

*AssociATE Professor Rhys 

Mr. Arnold 

Mr. Corbin 

Lecturer: Mr. Lytle 

English loi and one other semester of freshman English are required 
for the College Degree. Credit will be allowed for either English 103 
or English 104, in addition to English loi and English 102. 

A student majoring in English will be required to take English 311-12 
and English 411-12. The comprehensive examination is divided into 
seven fields. To qualify for graduation, an English major must take 
the examination in five fields, one of the five to be Shakespeare. 

At the beginning of his senior year, an English major with an 
average of B or better may declare himself a candidate for honors. He 
will write an honors essay under the direction of the instructor of a 
seminar, and will take a one-hour oral examination in addition to the 
written comprehensive examination. 

101-102. Introduction to English Literature. 

First semester: several plays by Shakespeare. Second semester: Chaucer, Swift, 
Keats, one or more modern poets, and a novel. Themes both semesters. Staff. 

103-104. English Composition. 

English 103 Is required of students who need elementary drill in writing. English 
104 may be elected as an alternative to English 102. Staff. 

201-202. Representative Masterpieces. 

European literature in translation. First semester: The Iliad, The Odyssey, Greek 
plays, Lucretius. Second semester: The Divine Comedy, Faust, Fathers and Sons. 
Staff. 

301-302. Shakespeare. Mr. Harrison. 

303-304. Romantic Literature. Mr. Martin. 

305-306. Victorian Literature. Mr. Martin. 



•On leave 1963-1964. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 69 

307-308. Contemporary Literature. 

First semester: Contemporary Poetry. Mr. Spears. Second semester: Con- 
temporary Fiction. Mr. Lytle. 

309-310. American Literature. Mr. Moore. 

311-312. For Junior Majors. Credit, one hour each semester. First semester: 
Theory of Literature. Mr. Spears. Second semester: History of English. Mr. 
Harrison. 

351-352, Seminar: Medieval English Literature. Mr. Rhys. Not offered m 1963- 
1964. 

353-354. Seminar: the Renaissance. Mr. Arnold. 

355-356. Seminar: Restoration and Eighteenth Century. Mr. Spears. 

357-358. Seminar: the Novel. Mr. Moore. 

359-360. Seminar: the Drama. Mr. Corbin. 

362. Seminar: Studies in Poetry. Mr. Spears. 

363-364. Seminar: Advanced Writing. Mr. Lytle. 

401-402. Seminar: English Literary Criticism. Mr. Harrison. 

411-412. For Senior Majors. Survey of English Literature. Credit, one hour each 
semester. Mr. Harrison and Mr. Spears. 



FINE ARTS 
Mr. Barrett 

For students who me interested in Art but who intend to major in 
other fields, as well as for those who intend to major in Art, the De- 
partment of Fine Arts offers integrated programs which provide a 
broad background in Art History, Theory, Criticism, and Creative 
Skills. 

These courses as they are related to the other Humanities will enable 
students, and especially those who do not intend to major in Art, to 
enlarge their awareness of the visual arts and to develop an understand- 
ing of Art and Architecture as related to the issues of contemporary 
living. At least one studio workshop course is recommended to give 



/O THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Students an opportunity to become acquainted with the basic creative 
principles of the visual arts. Such an experience in acquiring a basic 
skill can become the foundation for constructive hobbies throughout 
the remainder of their lives. 

For students who wish to major in Art, a comprehensive approach is 
emphasized. Technical skill in creative expression is developed through 
studio workshop courses in Freehand Drawing, Painting, Two and 
Three Dimensional Design, and Color. A variety of media and ma- 
terials are used to explore basic creative ideas and experiences. For 
every six hours of studio workshop at least three hours of Art History 
and Theory is recommended. A minimum of 30 semester hours is 
required of a major in this department. By stating his preference for 
practical or theoretical art activities, the majoring student may con- 
centrate his efforts in either the Studio Workshop or the History and 
Theory courses. If the student chooses to specialize in History and 
Theory of Art, then he should take three hours of studio workshop for 
every six hours of History-Theory. In consultation with the Chair- 
man of the Department, pertinent related courses from the offerings of 
other departments will be chosen to complete his program. 

The work of the Department of Fine Arts is essentially non-voca- 
tional, but it does furnish a solid foundation for further study and work 
in both art history and professional art careers. One of the depart- 
ment's major objectives is to help the student discover relationships 
in all phases of his experiences in the Humanities. Thus he will de- 
velop and enlarge his awareness of the importance of independent in- 
sight, judgment, and understanding of worthy values. 

A Survey of Art History and Theory in the Western World. 

A history of architecture, sculpture, painting and the minor arts, including analysis 
of the elements and principles of art forms, supplemented by examples from the de- 
partmental collection of slides and periodic exhibitions of professional art work in the 
University Art Gallery, which adjoins the Department of Fine Arts. 

103. From Prehistoric to Aegean Art. First Semester 1963-1964 and every three 
years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

104. Classical Art. The ancient art of Greece and Rome. Second semester 1963- 
1964 and every three years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

201. Medieval Art. From Early Christian to Gothic Art. First Semester 1964-1965 
and every three years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

202. The Italian Renaissance. From Trecento to CInquecento. Second Semester 
1964-1965, and every three years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES *J1 

301. From the XVII Century to Impressionism. First Semester 1962-1963 and 

every three years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

302. Modem Art. Second Semester 1962-1963 and every three years. (Credit^ 
three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

101-102. Art Appreciation. 

This course includes analysis methods which can open exciting fields for exploration 
and study of the structural and aesthetic prmciples of pictorial composition and design 
and their relationship to the other humanities in contemporary society. (Credit, three 
hours) 10 1. Explores Painting and the Graphic Arts. 102 is a continuation of lOtf 
and explores Architecture, Sculpture, and the Minor Arts. Mr. Barrett. 

Studio Workshop Courses. 

By selecting and usmg what seems best from various sources, these workshop courses 
are designed to guide the student in acquirmg basic creative skills and experiences 
necessary in developmg his art ideas, abilities, and understandmg from merely curious 
interest to proficient creative expression. The Art major should take a minimum of 
six studio workshop hours and three hours of History-Theory per week each semester 
for a minimum of six semesters. 

105-106. Freehand Drawing. 

A beginning course in seeing, understanding, and drawing realistically, simple still- 
life objects and casts, portraits, landscapes, and figure sketches in pencil, charcoal, and 
pastels. The fundamentals of freehand perspective and elementary pictorial composition 
are studied. Each class problem is used as a point of departure for more creative 
design experiments. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

107-108. Two Dimensional Design. 

The Basic principles of two dimensional design concepts are explored. Creative 
experiments are made, using line, shape, plane, color, and texture to express graphically 
an idea m flat or shallow space. This course is also an introduction to Advertising 
Layout. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

201-202. Three Dimensional Design. 

Basic three dimensional concepts of form and space relationships, structural funda- 
mentals, and chance forms are analyzed and graphically expressed. This course is 
also an introduction to Architectural Design, Interior Design and Sculpture. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

109. Experiments in Color, (repeated ^ach semester). 

These experiments enable a student to develop an easy familiarity with, and an 
understanding of color, and how to use it. The course consists of an analysis of 
color theories through a series of practical experiments using different media and 
tools. Although it supplements other related design and painting courses, no previous 
experience in art is necessary. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

110-111. Painting. 

The techniques of oil, water color, tempera, and pastels are explored through stiH' 



72 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

life, portrait, and landscape assignments. The student learns how these problems of 
paintmg differ from those of drawing. At the same time he develops his own ability 
to express himself in terms of the limitations of the medium with which he chooses 
to work. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

An Evening Community Art Class. No previous art experience necessary. 

This class is open to all interested members of the tommunity and faculty. There 
is a charge of $10.00 for each person enrolled each semester. The class meets for 
three hours one evening per week (there are approximately 14 or 15 meetings) per 
semester. A limited number of interested University students may enter at any time 
at no charge. This is a non-credit course. Mr. Barrett. 



FORESTRY 

Professor Cheston 

*AssociATE Professor Smith 

Associate Professor Baird 

Dr. Krumbach 

Mr. Hobart 

Mr. McIver 

Research Center Lecturers 
Mr. Mignery 
Mr. Burton 
Mr. Russell 
Mr. Smalley 

The four-year course of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Forestry is designed to provide the student with a thorough 
background in general education. Sufficient Forestry training Is given 
the student to enable him to enter the field of Forestry or to do grad- 
uate work. Generous amounts of field and laboratory work are in- 
cluded in the curriculum. 

The forest land of the University of over 8,000 acres is managed on 
a multiple-use basis for continuous hardwood production. Forestry 
students share in the problems encountered in a modern forest manage- 
ment program, and work out problems of forest land management. 

Complete utilization equipment is provided by a sawmill, a dry kiln, 
and a remanufacturing plant Including a moulder. Students see first- 
hand demonstrations and take part in logging, milling, drying, and 

♦On leave first semester 1963-1964. 



J 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 73 

manufacture of lumber. The Forestry Department operates these fa- 
cilities for their educational value and for the benefit of the University. 

Snowden Forestry Building with attached greenhouse and contain- 
ing 10,000 square feet of floor space was constructed in 1963. All 
rooms are paneled in wood donated by lumbermen and friends of Se- 
wanee. Classrooms and laboratories are modern and provide an 
atmosphere especially conducive to the study of forestry. Of special 
interest in the display cases is the Lou Williams gavel collection. This 
collection was made by Mr. Williams of Chattanooga who personally 
collected the woods from all over the world and made the gavels. 
Another collection of unique and rare quality is the Nickey wood 
collection. This collection of 8,800 different wood samples is classified 
and maintained in mahogany filing cabinets in its own room. It pre- 
sents a rare opportunity for the wood technician to study rare and 
exotic woods. 

It is recommended that a student who plans to major in Forestry 
take the following courses: 

Freshman Year Sophomore Year 

Forestry loi Forestry 201-202 

Biology 101-102 Civil Engineering 101-102 

English 101-102 Economics 101-211 

History 101-102 English 201-202 

Language 101-102 Language 201-202 

Mathematics 101-102 Air Science or Physical Education 

Air Science or Physical Education 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Forestry 303-304 Forestry 401-402 

Forestry 301-302 Forestry 403 

Forestry 305-306 Forestry 404 

Forestry 307-308 Chemistry or Physics 

Religion or Philosophy 101-102 Political Science 

Electives Electives 

During the spring recess of the Senior year, each Forestry student is 
required to perform intensive field work and prepare a written report. 
One hour's credit will be granted for this work. The cost of board and 
room for this period will be the concern of each student. The location 
of the forested area to be worked on may vary according to the needs 
of the students. 

During the last semester of their Senior year, Forestry students will 
accompany an instructor on a field trip to visit various forestry enter- 
prises of regional significance in the area surrounding Sewanee. Stu- 



74 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

dents on this trip will ordinarily visit lumbering operations, national 
forests, and other points of particular significance to them. 

Special equipment needed by the forestry student during his course 
of study includes drawing instruments, triangles, scales, protractor, 
hand compass, clipboard, cruising axe, hand lens, wedge prism, and 
field clothes. 

Each Forestry major is required to spend summers engaged in 
practical forestry work in lieu of the common forestry school summer 
camp. This requirement may be replaced by formal training at 
any recognized forestry school summer camp. Practical summer work 
for the Forestry requirement can be satisfied by work with the Forest 
Service or at forest products industrial establishments. The Forestry 
Department will help a student obtain necessary practical summer 
work. These are all salaried positions. 

U. S. Forest Service Research Project 

The Sewanee Research Project, operated by the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, and one of several branches of the Forest Service's South- 
ern Forest Experiment Station, in New Orleans, Louisiana, works in 
close cooperation with the Forestry Department of The University of 
THE South. Forestry students gain first-hand knowledge of forest re- 
search and participate in helping establish forest projects on the Uni- 
versity research forest. Technical forest research personnel are avail- 
able at all times to help the student with his forest problems. 

Work at the Sewanee forest management project emphasizes (i) soil- 
site relationships for pines and hardwoods, and (2) artificial regenera- 
tion of hardwoods. 

The major experimental areas are the 8,000-acre domain at The 
University of the South and the 2,600-acre Flat Top Experimental 
Forest near Birmingham. Studies are installed on industry lands, 
state ^and national forest, and other public lands in central Tennessee 
and north Alabama. Sewanee research should benefit related highland 
regions throughout the South. 

101. Introduction to Forestry. 

A survey of the field of American Forestry with particular reference to Southern 
forests. Designed for potential Forestry majors. Only first-year students admitted 
to the course. (Credit, one hour). Staff. 

201. Dendrology. 

A detailed study of the principal commercial forest trees of the United States, 



I 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 75 

includmg tree ranges, principal uses, silvical requirements, and major identifying 
features. Identification of the trees and native shrubs in the vicinity of the campus. 
Lectures, two hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite: Biology 101-102. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Smith. 

202. Wood Technology. 

The identification of domestic woods used in lumber and wood products industries 
in this country by gross and minute structural characteristics. A study of the effects 
of the physical features of woods on their commercial importance, and a micro- 
scopic investigation of the elemental structure of wood. Lectures, two hours; 
laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite: Biology 102 and Forestry 201. (Credit, three 
hours). 

SOL Forest Fire Control and Use. 

Principles of fire behavior and effects. Prevention and control of forest fires. Use 

of fire in forest land management. Generally offered in alternate years. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Smith. 

302. Forest Entomology. 

Fundamentals of morphology, physiology, and ecology of forest insects. Survey of 
the more important forest shade tree and wood product insect pests of North America 
with fundamentals of their control. Generally offered in alternate years. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Smith. 

303-304. Forest Mensuration. 

Prmciples, methods, and instruments employed in surveying forest land and In 
measurmg the content and growth of individual trees and of forest stands. Includes 
an introduction to forest aerial photogrammetry and a timber cruise leading to the 
preparation of a forest management plan. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three 
hours. Prerequisites: Forestry 201, Civil Engineering 102, and Mathematics 101-102. 
(Credit, four hours each semester). Mr. Baird. 

305-306. Silviculture. 

Interrelationship of environmental factors and forest vegetation with emphasis on 
tree physiology; the fundamentals of soil science; theories and techniques of applying 
ecological knowledge to the control of establishment, composition, and growth of forests. 
Laboratory and field work on the University Domain. (Credit, four hours each 
semester). Mr. Smith. 

307-308. Wood Utilization. 

The harvesting and processing of forest products; the manufacture of lumber and 
of wood products; a study of methods and equipment. Field trips to forest products 
industries and to commercial logging operations on the University Domain. Use of 
economic approach. Generally offered on alternate years. Lectures, three hours; 
laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours each semester Mr. Baird. 

40L Forest Management. 

The application of business methods and technical forestry principles to the opera- 



76 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

tion of a forestry property. Prerequisites: Civil Engineermg 102 and Forestry 201. 
(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Cheston. 

402. Forest Valuation. 

Economic analysis of forestry activities. Appraisal and valuation of forest land and 
stumpage. Prerequisite: Forestry 401. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Cheston. 

403-404. Forestry Seminar. 

A study of topics not covered in the general forestry courses offered. Designed to 
acquaint students with the entire field of forestry and to allow them an opportunity 
for research into forest subjects of special interest. (Credit, one hour each semester). 
StaflF. 

405. Forest Economics. 

Principles of economics applied to the management of forest land and to the 
production, distribution, and consumption of forest products. Prerequisites: Economics 
loi or the consent of the instructor. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Baird. 

406. Economics of Conservation. 

Renewable and non-renewable natural resources with particular emphasis on economic 
aspects. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Cheston. 



FRENCH 

Professor Buck 

Associate Professor Bates 

Assistant Professor Jones 

A major shall consist of not less than twenty-four hours selected 
from courses numbered 300 or higher. 

101-102. Elementary French. 

The phonology and basic structure of the French language. (Credit, six hours). 
Staff. 

201-202. Intermediate French. 

Intensive and extensive reading of modern texts. Continued drill in pronunciation 
and oral expression. Prerequisite: French 102 or two years of French in secondary 
school. (Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

301-302. An Introduction to French Literature. 

A study of representative masterpieces from the Chanson de Roland to the 
present. Prerequisite: French 202 or equivalent. (Credit, three hours each semester). 
Staff. 

311-312. Composition and Conversation. 

Intensive exercises in the use of written and oral Frencn. Reading and discussion 



i 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 77 

of contemporary texts. Prerequisite: French 202 or equivalent. (Credit, three hours 
each semester). Mr. Bates. 

401. The Seventeenth Century. 

Authors of the age of Henri IV and Richelieu, with emphasis on baroque poets, 
Comeille, Descartes, and Pascal. Fall, 1964 and alternate years. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Jones. 

402. The Seventeenth Century. 

A study of the classical authors of the age of Louis XIV, with emphasis on 
Moliere, La Fontaine, and Racine. Spring, 1965 and alternate years. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Jones. 

403. The Eighteenth Century. 

A study of the literature of the period of the Enlightenment, with emphasis on the 
thought of Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. Spring, 1966 and alter- 
nate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Jones. 

405. The Romantic Movement. 

A study of the major authors, with emphasis on Chateaubriand, Lamartine, VIgny, 
Hugo, and Musset. Readings, lectures, reports. Fall, 1965 and alternate years. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Buck. 

406. The Realistic Novel. 

The fiction of Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, and Zola. Readings, lectures, reports. 
Spring, 1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Buck. 

407. The Late Nineteenth Century. 

The authors of the second half of the century, with emphasis on Leconte de Lisle 
and Baudelaire. Fall, 1964 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Buck. 

408. Contemporary Literature. 

The novel, poetry, and drama of the twentieth century. Readmgs, lectures, re- 
ports. Not offered 1964-1965. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Bates. 

409. The Renaissance. 

A study of the major authors, with emphasis on Rabelais, the Pleiade poets, and 
Montaigne. Readings, lectures, and short papers. Fall, 1965 and alternate years. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Jones. 

435-436. Senior Tutorial. 

Special Topics. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. (Credit, three hours each 
semester) . Staff. 



7b THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

GERMAN 

Professor Whitesell 

Assistant Professor Lockard 

The minimum requirement for majors in German is 30 credit hours, 
including 311-312 and 405-406; those planning to continue the German 
major in graduate school should take 36 hours in the Department. 

101-102. Beginning German. 

Grammar and easy reading; considerable emphasis is placed upon pronunciation and 
elementary conversation through the practice techniques of the language laboratory. 
In the second semester the study of grammar is continued, but special attention is 
given to rapid and exact reading of German texts. (Credit, six hours). Mr. Lockard. 

201-202. Intermediate German. 

Representative pieces of prose fiction are read and discussed. The primary 
emphasis is placed upon the exact understanding of the German text. In the second 
semester a modern German novel and a piece of classical epic or dramatic poetry 
are read. Prerequisite: German 101-102 or placement test with a satisfactory grade 
(Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

301-302. Advanced Readings. 

Selected stories by Storm, Keller, Meyer, and Stifter are read and discussed. In 
course 302 one work each of Goethe and Schiller is read plus a modern novel. (Credit, 
three hours each semester). Mr. Whitesell. 

311-312. Intermediate German Conversation and Composition. 

Intensive conversational exercises and drill in colloquial idioms. Grammar review. 
Regular practice in composition at the intermediate level; part of the work in the 
second semester is based on current periodicals. The course is conducted in German 
and is required of majors. Prerequisite: German 201-202. (With permission of 
instructor may be taken concurrently with 201-202). (Credit, three hours each 
semester). Mr. Lockard. 

401-402. Goethe's Life and Work. 

Faust, Werther, Iphigenie, and Hermann und Dorothea are read entire in class. 
Each semester one other major work of Goethe is assigned for outside reading. Pre- 
requisite: German 301-302 or consent of instructor. (Credit, three hours each semester). 
Given 1965-1966 and alternate years. Mr. Whitesell. 

403-404. Schiller's Life and Work. 

Die Rduber, Kabale und Liebe, and Don Carlos, together with the early poetry, 
are read in the first semester. W allenstein, Maria Stuart, Wilhelm Tell, and the 
later poetry are studied in the second. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, three 
hours each semester). Mr. Lockard. 

405-406. Survey of German Literature. 

The history of German literature is studied from the beginnings down to the 
present day. Required of all majors. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. 
Whitesell. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 79 

HISTORY 

Professor Grimes 

Professor Webb 

Assistant Professor Campbell 

Mr. Read 

Dr. Goodstein 

Students planning to major in History are urgently advised to take 
such courses as will satisfy the basic College requirements for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree during the Freshman and Sophomore years. 
Those planning to continue their study of History in graduate school 
are advised to select French or German as their language. The mini- 
mum requirement in addition to History 101-102 for any student ma- 
joring in the Department is eight semester courses and History 351-352. 

The comprehensive examination is a written examination which may 
be supplemented by an oral examination for those students who are 
candidates for honors in History. 

101-102. An Introductory History of Europe. 

Designed to introduce the student to the problems of modem civilization and to 
provide a background for courses in Economics and Political Science as well as in 
History. (Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

201-202. History of the United States. 

A general survey of the political, constitutional, economic, and social history of 
the United States. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Webb. 

205-206. History of England. 

A general survey of the political, constitutional, economic, and social history of 
England and the British Empire smce the Anglo-Saxon Conquest. (Credit, three 
hours each semester). Mr. Campbell. 

207-208. Russian History. 

An introduction to the mam developments In Russian social and political life from 
the Kievan State to the present Soviet state. Emphasis will be placed on different 
schools of Interpretation and their relative merit. (Credit, three hours each semester). 

301-302. Ancient History. 

The history of the ancient world from pre-historlc times through the third 
century A.D. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours each semester). 
Mr. Grimes. 

303-304. Medieval History, 300-1300. 

The history of medieval Europe from the fourth to the fourteenth century, with 
special emphasis on social, economic, and religious developments. 1965-1966 and 
alternate years. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Grimes. 



8c THE UNIVERRSITY OF THE SOUTH 

305. The Renaissance and Reformation. 

The history of Europe during the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries, with 
special emphasis on the Renaissance in Italy and in northern Europe, the Protestant 
Revolt, and the Catholic Reform. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Grimes. 

306. Europe in the Seventeenth Century. 

The history of Europe (excluding the British Isles) from 1600 to 1715, emphasiz- 
ing the religious wars, mercantilism, absolutism, the growth of the European states 
system, and the rise of modern science. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, three 
hours). 

308. The Revolutionary Era. 

A study of the history of Europe during the revolutionary era, with emphasis on 
the history of France during the revolutionary and Napoleonic periods. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Read. 

309. Modem Europe, 1848-1914. 

A study of the internal development of the principal states, the problem arising 
from the Industrial Revolution, nationalism, and imperialism, and the origins of World 
War I. (Credit, three hours). 

Sll. Recent and Contemporary Europe. 

Modem Europe since 1914: the internal development of the prmcipal states, the 
ideological conflict, economic nationalism, and the search for a system of collective 
security. (Credit, three hours). 

313. British Empire and Commonwealth. 

The history of the first and second British Empires, with particular attention to 
the commonwealth and the historical development of Canada, India, Australia, New 
Zealand, and South Africa. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Campbell. 

321. American Economic History, 

The process of change in American economic society; the causes and effects of 
change, both economic and non-economic. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Goodstem. 

324. Colonial and Revolutionary America. 

The development of mstitutions and ideas in colonial society. (Credit, three hours.) 
Mrs. Goodstein. 

327. History of the South. 

A study of Southern nationalism from the War of 18 12 to the First World War, 
with special emphasis on political, economic, and cultural factors. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Webb. 

328. The United States in the Twentieth Century. 

A study in the political, social, and cultural response of American democracy to the 
problems of urbanism and industrialism at home and to the responsibilities of world 
conflict abroad. 1965-1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Webb. 

331. Diplomatic History of the United States. 

A survey of the diplomatic history of the United States from the American Revo- 



r 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 8 1 

lution to the present, with special emphasis upon the historical evolution of American 
foreign policy in the 20th Century. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Webb. 

337. Seventeenth Century England. 

The political, social, and intellectual history of England from 1603 to 1714. Pre- 
requisite: History 205-206. 1965-1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). 

338-339. Problems in History. 

Advanced courses open to Juniors and Seniors only. Emphasis Is placed upon 
individual work in consultation with the instructor. (Credit, three hours). StaflF. 

351-352. Introduction to the Study of History. 

An Introduction to the history of historical writing and to the methods and tech- 
niques of historical research. (Credit, one hov each semester). Required of all 
Junior majors. StaflF. 

451-452. Senior Tutorial. 

The course is designed to acquaint the student with the major historians and his- 
torical philosophies through individual reading under the direction of the mstructor. 
(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Grimes. 



I 



MATHEMATICS 

Professor Bruton 
Associate Professor Puckette 

Associate Professor Cross 

Associate Professor McLeod 

Mr. Tucker 

The mathemiatics requirement can be satisfied by any two semester 
courses, with the exception of Mathematics 211. 

All courses meet three hours a week and give three hours credit 
each semester. 

101-102. Freshman Mathematics. 

A unified course including such topics as the concept of function, analytic geometry, 
trigonometry, and an introduction to the calculus. This course is normal for the first 
year, and students who complete the course are prepared for Mathematics 201-202. 
StaflF. 

103. Analytic Geometry. 

The problem of association between an algebraic equation and a geometric curve. In- 
cluding the straight line, conic sections, transcendental curves, curves in polar co- 
ordinates, and parametric equations. StaflF. 



22 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

104. Finite Mathematics. 

The study of finite sets and their relation to symbolic logic, vectors, matrices, and 
probability theory. Mr. Cross. 

201-202. Differential and Integral Calculus. 

A thorough course in the calculus, including series, partial differentiation, and 
multiple mtegration. Prerequisite: Mathematics I02 or 103. Staff. 

203-204-205. Calculus and Analytic Geometry. 

A combined course for selected freshmen. It includes a thorough treatment of 
calculus, with the omission of functions of several variables. Staff. 

211. Elementary Statistics. 

The use of data for Inference. Intludes an introduction to probability, frequency 
distributions, the standard probability distributions, the central limit theorem, 
estimation of population parameters, and an Introduction to correlation theory. Mr. 
Baird. 

301-302. Advanced Calculus. 

A continuation of calculus, with emphasis on functions of several variables. 
Normally required of all majors in mathematics. Mr. Bruton. 

303. Theory of Numbers. 

An introduction to the integers. Includes the standard number-theoretic functions, 
properties of the primes, analysis of congruences, quadratic residues, continued frac- 
tions, Diophantine analysis, and twenty-three unsolved problems. Mr. Cross. 

304. Linear Algebra. 

An introductory study of linear transformations and matrices with applications. 
Prerequisite: 201 or 205 or permission of instructor. Mr. McLeod. 

312. Differential Equations. 

Properties of solutions of ordinary differential equations, introduction to partial 
differential equations, and applications to physical problems. PrePequisIte: Mathe- 
matics 301 or permission of instructor. Mr. Bruton. 

313. Theory of Games. 

Finite two-person zero-sum games: mixed strategies, von Neumann's theorem, 
Kuhn's extensive form. Continuous two-person zero-sum games; distribution func- 
tions, the fundamental theorem, separable games. Fmlte n-person games: the von 
Neumann-Morgentstem theory and the Nash non-cooperative theory. Mr. McLeod. 

315-316. Geometry. 

Selected topics in various geometries, primarily from the point of view of the trans- 
formations allowed by the geometry. In 1963-64 it also included an intensive study 
of problems in combinatorial geometry (the Hadwiger-Debrunner sequence). Mr. 
Pucketle. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 83 

321. Probability and Statistics. 

A treatment of probability and a logical development of the framework of mathe- 
matical statistics. It includes sampling, estimation of parameters, hypothesis testing, 
and confidence methods. Prerequisite: Calculus. Mr. McLeod. 

401-402. Modern Algebra. 

A study of the standard algebraic structures: groups, rings, and ideals, fields, and 
integral domains. The seicond semester also includes field extensions and an in- 
troduction to algebraic number fields and Galois theory. Normally required of all 
majors. Mr. Cross. 

403-404. Honors Seminar. 

Selected topics. 

405-406. Honors Tutorial. 

Independent study in selected topics. 

409. Mathematical Logic. 

Same as Philosophy 409. Mr. Caldwell. 

411. Functions of a Complex Variable. 

An introduction to analytic functions, including the elementary functions in the 
complex plane, Cauchy's integral formula, Taylor and Laurent series, the residue 
theorem, tonformal mapping, and analytic continuation. Applications to elementary 
mathematics and physical problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 302. Mr. McLeod. 

412. Functions of a Real Variable. 

Set theory, metric spaces, the Riemann-Stieltjes integral, preservation of properties 
under convergence, the Stone-Weierstrass theorem, and harmonic analysis. Includes 
an introduction to measure theory and the Lebesgue integral through the Riesz-Fischer 
theorem. Mr. McLeod. 

421. Topology. 

A dis'cussion of general topology, including non-metric spaces. Notions of compact- 
ness, connectedness, local compactness and connectedness, with emphasis on applica- 
tions to analysis. Prerequisite: Mathematics 202 or 205. Mr. McLeod. 



MUSIC 
Assistant Professor Running 
Assistant Professor McCrory 

101-102. Music Fundamentals. 

A basic study of the art of reading music, learning to follow a printed score. A 
study of the signs and symbols of music to understand the basic patterns of rhythm 
and meter. Two hours a week. Music 101 is prerequisite for Music 102. (Credit, 
two hours each semester). Miss McCrory. 



84 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

201>202. Appreciation of Music. 

Designed to assist the student to listen to music appreciatively and intelligently and 
to familiarize him with the works of the great composers. Prerequisite 101-102 or 
the equivalent musical background. Music 201 is prerequisite to 202. One hour a 
week. (Credit, one hour each semester). Miss McCrory. 

215-216. Music Literature of the Contemporary Period. 

A detailed study of the literature of the period, coinciding with the Festival of 
Contemporary Music projected for the year 1964-1965. One hour a week. (Credit, 
one hour each semester). Mr. Runnmg. 

301-302. History of Music. 

A systematic survey of the course of musical history from the days of plainsong, 
through the rise of the polyphonic, classic, and romantic schools, to the present day. 
Music 301 is prerequisite to 302. Three hours a week. (Credit, three hours a se- 
mester). Miss McCrory. 

401-402. Music Theory. 

A study of keyboard harmony, musical dictation, and basic harmony. Prerequisite: 
Music 101-102, or proficiency on an instrument. Three hours a week. (Credit, 
three hours each semester). Mr. Running. 

411-412. Introduction to Church Music. 

Historical background of the relationship of music to the Liturgy; hymnology and 
the use of music in the contemporary church. One hour a week. (Credit, one hour 
each semester). Mr. Running. 



Note: Membership in the University Choir and Band is open to all qualified stu- 
dents by audition. Membership in the Choir or Band gives one hour of academic 
credit each semester; but credit may not be earned in both concurrently, and not 
more than four hours of credit may be granted in either or in a combination of the 
two. Private instruction in voice, organ, piano, and some mstruments is available 
upon request of the student. 



PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Marshall 
Associate Professor Caldwell 

The year-course requirement of Philosophy or Religion may be met 
by taking any two semester courses in the Department of Philosophy. 

All courses in the Department count towards the major in Philoso- 
phy, and students majoring must take at least 27 hours in the Depart- 
ment. Students planning to do graduate work in Philosophy are ex- 
pected to take additional courses in the Department including General 
Logic. The comprehensive examination is both written and oral, and 
IS taken in fields chosen by the student In consultation with the 
Chairman of the Department. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 85 

101-102. Introduction to Western Thought. 

An Introduction to philosophy through the reading of a selected number of philo- 
sophical classics. Open only to Freshmen and Sophomores. (Credit, three hours 
each semester). Staff. 

201. Plato. 

A study of Plato's dialogues, with emphasis on his influence in creating modem 
thought. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

202. Aristotle. 

A study of representative works written by Aristotfe and of Aristotle's influence on 
Western civilization. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

203. Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy. 

The philosophical significance of certain fundamental developments in modern 
mathematics such as non-Euclidean geometries, projective geometry, theory of groups, 
the real number system, set theory, and transfinite arithmetic. No special mathe- 
matical knowledge required as a prerequisite. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Caldwell. 

204. General Logic. 

An introduction to the principles of valid reason. Included are traditional logic, 
scientific methodology, and an introduction to symbolic logic. Emphasis on applica- 
tions of logic to ordinary discourse. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Caldwell 

209. Psychology. 

A study of general psychology, with particular stress on psychological theory. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

210. Psychology of Personality. 

The application of psychological principles to the problems of personality. Pre- 
requisite: Philosophy 209. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

300. Philosophy of Science. 

An investigation of the principles of the natural sciences. Methodology, the role 
of mathematics and logic, hypotheses, verification, concept formation, theory construc- 
tion, scientific explanation, the relation of science to other areas of knowledge. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Caldwell. 

303. Philosophy of Law. 

The law considered from the standpoint of philosophical ideas embedded within 
it. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

305. Aesthetics. 

Aesthetic theory considered primarily in terms of Aristotellanism and Neo-Platonlsm. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

306. Contemporary Philosophy. 

A study of the major philosophical movements of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: 
Philosophy 101-102 or 307-308. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Caldwell. 



86 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

307-308. History of Philosophy. 

Philosophy from the Milesians to modern times, augmented by the use of source 
material. (Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

314. The Philosophy of Whitehead. 

Alfred North Whitehead's philosophy studied m Its relations to modern thought. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Caldwell. 

400. Cosmology. 

A comparison of such cosmologlcal systems as those of Plato, Aristotle, Newton, 
Einstein, and Whitehead. Recent discoveries In the foundations of science and 
mathematics and their relevance to a synthesis of conflicting principles of order. 
Prerequisite: six semester hours of philosophy or consent of the Instructor. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Caldwell. 

401. Ethics. 

Ethics Investigated through selected problems. Papers are read and criticized in 
class. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

402. Philosophy of Religion. 

Philosophy of religion Investigated through selected problems. Papers are read and 
criticized In class. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

403. Epistemology. 

Epistemology Investigated by the examination of typical systems of the theory of 
knowledge. Papers are read and criticized in class. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Mar- 
shall. 

404. Metaphysics. 

Metaphysics Investigated by the examination of certain contemporary problems. 
Papers are read and criticized In class. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

405-406. History of Philosophy in the 17th and 18th Centuries. 

The History of Philosophy considered In terms of selected philosophers. Papers are 
read and criticized In class. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Marshall. 

407-408. The Thought of St. Thomas Aquinas. 

The philosophy of Thomas Aquinas studied In the text and through his commenta- 
tors. (Credit, three hours each semester). 

409. Mathematical Logic. 

Propositlonal logic, predicate logic, set theory, the Frege-Russell-Whitehead logistic 
thesis, Introduction to the foundations of mathematics. Prerequisite: differential 
and integral calculus or consent of the instructor. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Cald- 
weU. 

411-412. Senior Tutorial. 

Individual study, with tutorial instruction. (Credit, three hours each semester). 
Staff. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 8/ 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Mr. Bryant 
Mr. Bitondo 
Mr. Majors 
Mr. Varnell 
Mr. Moore 
Mr. Carter 

All students must receive credit for four semesters of satisfactory 
work in Physical Education. The Director of Physical Education shall 
determine whether or not a student's work is satisfactory. A minimum 
swimming requirement must be met by all students. Exceptions: (i) 
students who are excused from physical activity by a physician, (2) 
students who are military veterans, (3) students in the Air Force ROTC 
unit, (4) students excused by the Dean of the College. 

Until he has completed this requirement, each student must attend 
three scheduled periods each week of one hour in length. (Academic 
credit of one hour per semester is given for satisfactory work; maxi- 
mum credit, four hours.) 

Among the objectives of this program are: 

1. To develop an enthusiasm for playing some game well so that it 
may be enjoyed both in college and in later life. 

2. To develop agility and coordination of mind, eye, and body. 

3. To develop the ability to swim. 

4. To grow in understanding and develop skills in maintaining- 
physical fitness for daily living. 

Instruction is given in archery, badminton, baseball, basketball, bowl- 
ing, golf, gymnastics, handball, softball, swimming, tennis, touch foot- 
ball, track and field, volleyball, weighdifting, and wrestling. 



PHYSICS 

Professor Petry 

Associate Professor Allen 

Physics 101-102 is basic to all other courses in the Department. A 
major consists of at least eight semester lecture courses and one ad- 
vanced laboratory course, with Chemistry .101-102 and Mathematics 
201-202 as related courses. Students planning to do graduate work in 



88 



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 



Physics or Engineering lare expected to take additional courses in I 

Mathematics and are advised to acquire a reading knowledge of Ger- , 
man. 

A student electing a miajor in Physics should take Mathematics ; 

201-202 as soon as possible, as these courses are prerequisites for , 

courses numbered 300 and above, and are to be taken before, or con- \ 

currently with, Physics 203-204 or Physics 207-208. i 

I 

10M02. General Physics. ] 

Physics 101. j 

Mechanics, heat, wave motion, and sound. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three \ 

hours. Prerequisite: a course in trigonometry m high school or college. (Credit, i 
four hours). Mr. Petry. 

Physics 102. I 

Electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Lettures, three hours; labora- j 

tory, three hours. Prerequisite: Physics loi. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Petry. I 

203. Optics. I 

A study of the fundamental principles of geometrical and physical optics. Lectures, \ 

recitations, and problems. Fall, 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, one hour [ 

each semester). Staff. \ 

205-206. Intermediate Laboratory. | 

This course affords an opportunity for further training and experimental study in ) 
Physics. Laboratory, three hours. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, one 
hour each semester). Staff. 

I 

207. Fundamentals of Electronics. '\ 

Spring semester. (With laboratory; tredit, four hours). Mr. Allen. J 

301-302. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. 

Lectures, recitations, and problems. Prerequisite: Physics 102, Mathematics 202. 

Physics 305-306 must be taken concurrently. Required of majors. (Credit, three » 
hours each semester). Mr. Allen. 

303. Intermediate Mechanics: Statics (Mathematics 311). 

Fall 1965-1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). | 

305-306. Advanced Laboratory. \ 

1965-1966 and alternate years. 305, Advanced electricity and magnetism; 306, 
Nuclear. (Credit, one hour each semester). Mr. Allen. 

307. Atomic Physics. 

This course includes the study of atomic particles, atomic structure, spectroscopy, 

x-rays, isotopes, and the photo-electric effect. Fall, 1965-1966 and alternate years. ! 



i 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 89 

Prerequisite: Physics loi and 102; Mathematics 201 (may be taken concurrently). 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Allen. 

308. Nuclear Physics. 

This course includes the study of radioactivity, nuclear structure, nuclear reattions, 
acceleration and detection instruments and nuclear energy. Spring, 1 965-1 966 and 
alternate years. Prerequisite: Physics 201; Mathematics 202 (may be taken con- 
turrently). (Credit, three hours). Mr. Allen. 

310. Thermodynamics. 

Fall, 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). 

401. Theoretical Mechanics: Dynamics. 

Prerequisite: Physics 303. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Allen. 

404. Theoretical Physics. 

Prerequisite: Physics 201, 301, and 303, and Mathematics 301, 302, and 312. 
(Credit, three hours). 

405-406. Senior Laboratory. 

1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, one hour each semester). Staff. 

410. Applied Mathematics. (Mathematics 410). 

Spring, I964-I9€s and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). 

Data Processing. 

A study of the fundamentals and application of modern computational methods 
using the electronic computer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 102. (Credit, one hour). 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Dugan 

Professor Lancaster 

Associate Professor Gilchrist 

Assistant Professor Keele 

Students fulfilling the social science requirement by taking courses in 
the Department of Political Science are advised that any two semester- 
courses are accepted as the "one-year course" required, and that any 
one semester of Political Science In combination with Economics loi 
will likewise fulfill the social science requirement. 

Students majoring in the Department of Political Science will 
normally be expected to complete, by the end of the junior year, courses 
101-102, one semester of International relations, one semester of theory, 
and two other semester-courses. All students majoring in the Depart- 



9© THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

ment are required to take the Graduate Record Examination as part 
of their written comprehensive examination. The written compre- 
hensive examination (in addition to the Graduate Record Examination) 
consists of two parts. Part I deals with Government, Politics, and 
Law, and is required of all majors. For Part II a candidate may take 
either a paper on Theory or a paper on International Relations. 

Comprehensive oral examinations will include major courses, other 
courses, materials of the written comprehensive examination, and the 
bibliography of Political Science, including contributions of leading 
scholars in the field. Certain students not candidates for honors and 
certain students whose standing is clear as the result of all parts of th« 
written comprehensive examination may, entirely at the discretion of 
the Department, not be required to take comprehensive oral examina- 
tions. 

In accordance with college regulations, a student majoring m the 
Department may take a maximum of 42 hours. 

Students majoring in the Department who intend to study law are 
strongly urged to take the Law School Admissions Test and to take 
courses in English History and Economics as soon as possible. 

101. American Government and Politics. 

A study of government and politics at all levels in the United States. (Credit, 
three hours). Staff. 

102. Modern Foreign Governments. 

The governments of England, Canada, France, Germany, Russia, and such other 
states as the instructor may include in the course. (Credit, three hours). Staff. 

104. State and Local Government. 

A critical examination of politics and the operation of government at the state, 
county, and city levels in the United States. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Gilchrist. 

203. English Constitutional Development. 

A study of the origins of the English constitution, and of its subsequent development, 
including the political and legal theory which accompanied this development. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Keele. 

204. American Constitutional Development. 

The colonial background of the American constitution; the forces that Influenced its 
framing; Its development by formal amendment, statutory elaboration, judicial in- 
terpretation, and change in usage; the American adaptation of English common lav7 
and equity. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Keele. 



I 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 9I 

207. Political Parties and Pressure Groups. 

The history, organization, and functions of political parties: the activities and im- 
portance of pressure groups and propaganda; the relationship between economic 
^wer and politics. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Gilchrist. 

215. Business Law. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the principles of business law; an 
approach to the law of contracts, bailments, negotiable instruments, common carriers, 
insurance, sales, wills; a study of the nature of legal remedies; information on how 
and when to seek legal advice. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Lancaster. 

221-222. History of European Diplomacy. 

A diplomatic history of Europe and the world, with emphasis on the period since 
1814. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Dugan. 

301. History of Political Theory. 

The development of political thought in the West, with emphasis on the period 
smce the sixteenth century. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Gilchrist. 

302. Recent Political Theory. 

A continuation of Political Science 301, with emphasis on late nineteenth and 
twentieth century thought in Europe and America; the relationship between sociology 
and politics, and the relationship between ethics and politics. (Credit, three hours). 
Mr. Gilchrist. 

308. The Legislative Process. 

The composition, organization, procedure, and powers of legislative bodies in the 
United States and abroad; the study of standard classical works on the nature of 
legislation, such as those of Bentham; a consideration of modern theories concerning 
the nature and function of legislation. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Gilchrist. 

309. American Political Thought. 

American political theory considered historically and in its relationships with 
American history, American constitutional development, and American legal theory. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Keele. 

321. Introduction to International Politics. 

The European states system, and its worldwide extension; the balance of power, 
diplomacy, international institutions; the Importance of geography In international 
politics; the historical background of the world power conflict of today. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Dugan. 

322. American Foreign Policies. 

The conduct of foreign relations under the American constitutional and poHtlcal 
system. The main lines of American Interests In various areas, with emphasis on 
Latm America. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Dugan. 

323. The Middle East in World Politics. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Dugan. 



92 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

324. The Far East in World Politics. 

The Far East as an area of mtemational conflict, with emphasis on the period 
since the buildmg of the Trans-Siberian Railway. The Interests and policies of the 
powers m the Far East, and the relationship between the Far East and other areas 
of international conflict. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Dugan. 

351-352. Principles of Political Science. 

A course in the general principles of the subject, intended primarily for junior 
majors. (Credit, one hour each semester). Staff. 

401. Political Science and Government. 

A comparative study of modern constitutions and of the main branches of government 
and main forces In politics In the modem world. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Dugan. 

405. The Constitution of the United States. 

The constitution In law and custom, especially as it has developed smce 1937. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Lancaster. 

406. Jurisprudence. 

Historical and analytical jurisprudence, with emphasis on the systems of England 
and America; a brief study of the philosophical, comparative, and sociological schools 
of jurisprudence; the judicial process. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Lancaster. 

421-422. International Law and Organization. 

The sources, subjects, and major principles of International law; the function of 
law in the International community; the League of Nations, the Ideas underlying it, 
and Its effect on international society; the United Nations Organization, and Its limi- 
tations. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Lancaster. 

451-452. Tutorial. 

A course for specially selected senior majors and other specially selected senior 
students. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Dugan and others. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology 201-202 is the basic required course for all advanced 
work in the department. For those who might wish to prepare them- 
selves for graduate work in psychology, Mathematics 201-202, Physics 
101-102, and Biology 101-102 are strongly advised. 

201-202. Principles of Psychology. 

A survey of the facts and principles derived from the objective study of behavior, 
both human and infra-human. Theoretical and experimental findings in learning, 
motivation, emotions, perception, and Individual differences are considered. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 95 

301. Personality Theories. 

Contemporary personality theories are examined with reference to their structure, 
dynamics, and development. Major emphasis is placed on the psychoanalytic theories 
of Freud, Jung, and Adler. Prerequisite: Psychology 201-202. 

302. Abnormal Behavior. 

Behavioral disturbances, their nature, determmants, and relation to normal be- 
havior. Pre-requisite: Psychology 201-202. 

304. Tests and Measurements. 

A study of the variability of normal behavior as determined by various psychological 
measurements. A discussion of the methods of test construction and their use, as 
well as some practice m test administration and interpretation. Pre-requisite: Psy- 
chology 201-202. 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 
Mr. Marsh 

The College provides a laboratory course in speech, meeting in one 
two-hour session each week: exercise in diction and articulation; prac« 
tice in the delivery of extempore and prepared speeches. (Credit, one 
hour each semester). 



RELIGION 

Associate Professor Brettmann 

Associate Professor Collins 

Associate Professor Winters 

*AssisTANT Professor Woods 

In addition to the courses listed below, qualified upperclassmen may 
take courses in the School of Theology for credit in the College. Cred- 
its earned in this way will not count toward a degree in the School of 
Theology. Students in the School of Theology may take the advanced 
courses listed below. 

101-102. The English Bible. 

A survey of the whole Bible in historical outline. First semester, the Old Testament; 
second semester, the New Testament. Open to freshmen and sophomores only. (Credit, 
three hours each semester). Mr. Brettmann and Mr. Gjllins. 



*0n leave 1963-1964. 



94 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

201-202. Biblical Thought. 

The distinctive ideas of the Bible traced in both the Old and New Testaments. 
Juniors and Seniors must substitute this course for the requirement in Religion. Pre- 
requisite for sophomores, one year of religion or philosophy. This course is not open 
to freshmen. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Brettmann. 

204. Church History. 

The growth of the Christian Church from New Testament times to the Reformation, 
£rst semester; from the Reformation to modem times^ second semester. (Credit, 
three hours each semester.) Mr. Brettmann. 

301. Christianity and Secular Alternatives. 

A comparison and contrast of Christian and contemporary secular attempts to 
understand metaphysical, ethical, and socio-political issues. No prerequisite. (Credit, 
three hours.) Mr. Winters. 

305-306. Comparative Religion. 

First semester: primitive and ancient religion; the religions of India and the Far 
East, includmg Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shmto. Second se- 
mester: religions of the Near East, including Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Open 
only to Juniors and Seniors. Prerequisite: a year of religbn or philosophy. (Credit, 
three hours each semester). Mr. Collins. 

309-310. Christianity and Western Culture. 

The mutual influence of Christian ethical ideals and the principal historical and 
intellectual movements of the West in shaping culture. First semester, from New 
Testament times to the Reformation; second semester, Puritanism, the Sects, and 
modem problems. Open only to Juniors and Seniors. Prerequisite: a year of re- 
ligion or philosophy. Offered alternate years beginning 1963-1964. (Credit, three 
hours each semester). Mr. Brettmann. 



RUSSIAN 

Russian 101-102 is a course designed to give the student facility in 
reading, speaking, and understanding contemporary Russian. He will 
acquire the fundamentals of grammar and will develop ability In trans- 
lation and conversation. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 9)5 

SPANISH 

Professor Pickering 

Assistant Professor Webber 

Dr. Naylor 

The requirement for a major in Spanish is five year-courses beyond 
101-102. 

101-102. Beginnrng Spanish. 

The aim is facility in conversation, mastery of essential grammar, and ability to 
read simple Spanish. (Credit, sis hours). Staff. 

201-202. Intermediate Spanish. 

Training in Spanish conversation, reading, and grammar. Texts chosen for theii 
literary value. (Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

301-302. Introduction to Hispanic Literature. 

A survey of the literature of Spain from the Poema del Cid to the present. First 
semester: the medieval period, the "renaissance", the siglo de oro prose — Cervantes. 
Second semester: Lope, Calderon and the siglo de oro drama, nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries. Either semester may be taken Independently. Prerequisite: Spanish 201- 
202. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Naylor. 

311-312. Hispanic Culture and Civilization. 

The history, traditions, and art of the Hispanic peoples. (Credit, three hours each 
semester). Mr. Pickering. 

401-402. The Spanish Classics. 

The intensive study of several great authors and their works. Outside readings 
correlating the authors studied to Hispanic culture. Prerequisite: three year-courses 
in Spanish, mcluding 301-302. 1965-1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours 
each semester). Mr. Pickering. 

403-404. Literature of the Golden Age. 

The most brilliant period of Spanish Literature, studied in unabridged texts. 
Lectures and outside readings furnish background material. Prerequisite: same as for 
401-402. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. 
Pickering. 

407-408. Tutorial for Majors. 

Choice of literary materials according to the special interests of the students en- 
rolled. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Pickering. 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 



pS THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Admissions: Professors Gessell, Allison, Winters; Dean Alexander. 

Catalogue-. Dean Alexander; Professors Gessell, Griffin. 

Curriculum'. Professors Winters, Allison, Rhys. 

Directors of Book Store: Professors Winters, Allison, Gessell, Ralston; 
Mr. Douglas Vaughan, Mrs. McCrady, student C. VanKirk Hoyt. 

Library. Professors Winters, Griffin, Ralston; Mr. Harkins, Mr. Camp. 

Scholarships: Dean Alexander; Professors Gessell, Rhys, Allison. 

Committee in Student Field Work: Professors Gessell, Allison, Rhys; 
Dean Alexander. 

Committee on the St. Luke's Journal: Dean Alexander; Professors 
Rhys, Winters, Ralston, Gessell; students LeRoy Carter and S. 
Ross Jones. 

Honorary Degrees: Professors Rhys, Gessell, Ralston. 

Lectures: Professors Winters, Griffin, Allison. 

Long Range Planning: Professors Gessell, Rhys, Griffin, Allison, Rals- 
ton. 

Tutorial Program: Professors Winters, Ralston, Gessell, Allison. 

Music: Professor Running, Mr. Camp, Professor Gessell, the Chap- 
lain to the School of Theology. 






THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 99 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The School of Theology is a seminary of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church. It was established in 1878 as a constituent college of The 
University of the South with the status of a professional school, now 
fully accredited by The American Association of Theological Schools. 

The main building of the School of Theology, St. Luke's Hall, the 
gift of Mrs. Charlotte Manigault of South Carolina, was erected in 1878. 
In 195 1 a wing was added, and in 1956-57 the entire building was 
renovated. St. Luke's Hall now contains lecture and seminar rooms, 
the Dean's and Faculty's offices, the Grosvenor auditorium, the library 
with five floors of stacks, a student lounge and faculty common room, 
and dormitory rooms for forty-six single students. 

Housing for married students has been provided by buildings erected 
by the Dioceses of Florida, South Florida, Upper South Carolina, Ala- 
bama, Louisiana, Atlanta, and by St. Luke's Church, Atlanta, and 
Trinity Parish, Columbia, South Carolina. The Diocese of Tennessee 
and Miss Charlotte Gailor renovated and made available the Gailor 
Clergy House. The University from income of the Louis W. Alston 
bequest has provided five duplex units. Two students have built 
their own homes, eventually to be acquired by the University. All new 
units are of native sandstone. 

The library, with the William Welton Shearer Reading Room, con- 
tains some 22,000 catalogued volumes, files of diocesan journals, and 
the General Convention minutes. Library facilities are modern and 
adequate. 

The resources of the library are being further augmented by gifts 
and funds, as, for example, the following: certain stocks from Miss 
Celia Mills of St. Augustine, Florida; the Sidney L. Vail Memorial 
Book Fund, established by Mrs. Vail and her sons, Mr. Sidney L. Vail, 
Jr., and Dr. James M. Vail; memorial funds estabhshed in the memory 
of Henry D. Bull, Bayard Hale Jones, George Boggan Myers, Marshall 
Bowyer Stewart, and Richard M. Yeager; gifts from the Episcopal 
Churchwomen of the Diocese of North Carolina and of the Diocese of 
Louisiana; a gift from Christ Church Cathedral, St. Louis, honoring the 
Rev. Early W. Poindexter, Jr. 

The University Library, located very near St. Luke's Hall, contains 
many theological books, manuscripts, and other historical papers im- 
portant for research work. 

St. Luke's Chapel, erected in memory of the Rev. Telfair Hodgson, 
D.D., LL.D., a former Vice-Chancellor of the University and Dean of 



100 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

the School of Theology, was the gift of his family. Theological stu- 
dents, faculty, and their families worship also, from time to time, in 
All Saints' Chapel, the University Chapel, and in Otey Memorial Parish 
Church. 

St. Luke's Book Store is operated by the school under the supervision 
of a board of directors. All textbooks are ordered through the book 
store at a discount. A stock of recommended books is maintained for 
theological students and clergy. Mail service is given to clergy and 
alumni of the University. 

The Frank A. Juhan Gymnasium, with swimming pool and bowling 
alleys, is available to all students, and students participate in an active 
program of intramural athletics. 

ADMISSION, REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION 
OF STUDENTS 

Applicants for admission to the School of Theology must be graduates 
of an accredited college. In special cases, prospective students with- 
out the B.A. degree may satisfy the faculty that they are adequately 
equipped to meet the school's standard of studies. Procedure for 
application is as follows: 

1. Applicants shall have taken the General Aptitude Test of the 
Graduate Record Examination given by the Educational Testing 
Service.* 

2. The standard application form, available on request from the 
office of the Dean, must be submitted. 

3. All college transcripts shall be forwarded. 

4. A personal interview at the School of Theology is expected. In 
special circumstances the Dean may appoint a nearby presbyter to 
represent the school in this. 

After an applicant is accepted by the Admissions Committee, a pre- 
registration fee of ^25.00 should be sent to the Dean's Office, payable 
to the Treasurer of The University of the South. This fee will be 
credited to the following semester's expenses. 

Students in the School of Theology are permitted to take two courses 
in any semester in the undergraduate college of the University without 



*Full information may be obtained from the Graduate Record Examination, 
Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, or 4640 Hollywood Blvd., Los 
Angeles 27, California. A limited number of application forms for the examination 
can be supplied by the Dean's office upon request. 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY lOI 

further payment of fees; if more than two courses are taken, the 
college tuition fee is required. 

Regular Students are those who pursue the prescribed courses of the 
school. 

1. Those regular students who have a B.A. degree, or an equivalent 
bachelor's degree, and pursue the study of the New Testament in 
Greek may become candidates for the B.D. degree. 

2. Those regular students who have a B.A. Degree, or an equivalent 
bachelor's degree, and are dispensed by their Bishops from the study 
of Greek may become candidates for the Licentiate in Theology. 

3. Those regular students who do not have a bachelor's degree may 
become candidates for the Licentiate in Theology by pursuing either the 
Greek or English course. 

Special Students are those who, under appointment by their Bishops 
and under direction of the Dean and the faculty, pursue selected studies 
not directed toward graduation. 

Graduate Students are those who have their B.D. degree and are 
seeking the S.T.M. degree. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 
The requirements for graduation are the successful completion of all 

required and elective courses as outlined on page 108 and the award- 
ing of the degree or licentiate by the Senate of the University, 
on nomination by the faculty in Theology. The faculty is re- 
quired by the Canons of the Church to be concerned not only with the 
academic proficiency of the student but also with his personal qualifica- 
tions for the ministry. 

Licentiate in Theology 
Regular students who pass all prescribed work in either the Greek or 
the English course are eligible for the award of Licentiate in Theology. 

Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 
A regular student who has passed all prescribed work and met the 
following conditions is eligible to be awarded the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity: 

1. He must hold a bachelor's degree from an approved college. 

2. He must have studied the New Testament courses with the use of 
the Greek language. 



102 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

3. He must have maintained a C (or 2.00) average. 

4. Unless his average is B or above, he must have passed a compre- 
hensive examination with a grade of C or better. 

5. He must have passed a Bible content examination in Old Testa- 
Daent and New Testament. 

6. He must have fulfilled the clinical pastoral training requirement. 

Licentiate or Degree optime merens 
Any student who at the end of the Middle Year has earned an aver- 
age grade of 3.75 may apply to the faculty for permission to write a 
thesis in one of the five fields of study, under the direction of the 
appropriate professor. Application should be made to the faculty by 
November i, and the thesis subject should be submitted, with approval 
of the professor concerned, by December i. The final draft of the 
thesis must be submitted by April 15. If the thesis is satisfactory 
and the candidate has maintained the 3.75 average, he may receive the 
Licentiate in Theology or the degree of Bachelor of Divinity, "optime 



Degree of Master of Sacred Theology* 

1. An applicant for the Master of Sacred Theology degree must pos- 
sess the degree of Bachelor of Divinity or similar degree (Th.B. or 
S. T. B.). 

2. An apphcant must show a reading proficiency in languages requi- 
site for his course of study before being accepted as a candidate for the 
S. T. M. degree. 

3. An applicant may be asked to take the Aptitude Test of the 
Graduate Record Examination preceding the academic year in which 
he plans to begin his work and may be asked to take a qualifying 
examination. 

4. The candidate must successfully complete the equivalent of one full 
year of graduate study beyond the B.D. degree. Normally this will 
consist of 6 units of work in course, 4 of which are in a major fieldf; 
and an acceptable project or paper in this major field of study. The pro- 
posed project or paper must be approved by the faculty. Upon pre- 
sentation of three finished copies of the project report or paper, the 
candidate will be examined orally on it. 



•See Graduate School of Theology, page 118, for requirements in the summer session. 
tA unit is understood to be the equivalent of three hours of course work. 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY IO3 

5. The candidate must maintain a B (3.00) average and pass a com- 
prehensive examination in his major field. 

6. One year of academic residence is expected of the candidate, and 
work for the degree is expected to be completed within three years after 
matriculation. 

Hoods 

The hoods of the degrees conferred on the recommendation of the 
faculty of the School of Theology are of Oxford shape, single, all with 
purple cord cutting the colors. The hood of the Licentiate in Theology 
is black, lined with white with a four inch purple chevron and is three 
feet in its greatest dimension. The hood of the Bachelor of Divinity 
IS black, lined with scarlet, and is three feet in its greatest dimension. 
The hood of the Master of Sacred Theology is blue, lined with scarlet, 
and is three feet, six inches in its greatest dimension. 



104 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

PRE-THEOLOGICAL COURSE 

The School of Theology of The University of the South recom- i 

mends the following as a pre-theological course for students now in | 

college, or as much thereof as is practicable: j 

Semesters Semgster Hours 
English 4 12 i 

Composition and Literature j 

Philosophy 4 12 

History of Philosophy j 

Ethics j 

Logic \ 

Bible (content) 2 6 

History 6 18 ■ 

Ancient, Medieval, and Modem History \ 

European History (including English History) 

American History j 

Psychology i 3 | 

Languages i 

Greek (4 semesters recommended) 2 6 

Latin (4 semesters recommended) 2 6 I 

Mathematics 2 6 

Natural Sciences ; 

Chemistry or Physics 2 6 ^ 

Biology I 3 

Social Sciences ;■ 

Economics 2 6 

Sociology I 3 

Electives should for the most part be limited to subjects in fields listed above. To 
these may be added modem foreign languages, or Hebrew. \ 

The recommendations above are consistent with the "Statement on j 

Pre-Seminary Studies" issued by the American Association of Theologi- j 

cal Schools (Bulletin 23, June 1958, pp. 16-19), by which this School i 

of Theology is fully accredited. j 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY IO5 

CURRICULUM 

Greek 

In accordance with Canon 29 on the normal standard of learning of 
Candidates for Holy Orders, it is expected that the student will study 
the required New Testament courses with the use of the Greek lan- 
guage. Applicants for admission to the School of Theology are there- 
fore encouraged to prepare themselves in Greek before entering the 
seminary. 

Beginning students who can give evidence of their ability to read 
the New Testament in Greek will be assigned additional Greek reading 
with a review of elementary Greek. 

All beginning students not so prepared will be required to participate 
in a two week accelerated course in Greek, whether or not they are 
dispensed from canonical examinations in the Greek New Testament. 

Dean's Conference for Juniors 
"The Dean's Conference" for Juniors is held one hour each week 
throughout the year and offers an opportunity for careful consideration 
of the meaning of vocation, prayer and meditation, theological education 
and life in the school. 

Church Music 
The students of the School of Theology are required to become famil- 
iar with the fundamentals of music and voice production with emphasis 
on the music of the Church as found in the Hymnal 1940, the Psalter, 
and the Choral Service. 

Clinical Pastoral Training* 
Clinical pastoral training under approved supervision during the 
summer following the Junior year is required for the degree or licenti- 
ate. The program of clinical pastoral training is conducted by accredited 
chaplain supervisors in accredited institutions such as mental hospitals, 
general hospitals, penal and correctional centers, research centers and 
clinics. The program seeks to deepen the student's understanding of 
himself in his vocation through person-to-person relationships with 
troubled people to whom he seeks to minister. The program focuses 
on the experience of the student In the context of a pastoral situation 
under the dynamics of supervision. The purpose of pastoral training 



^See also page 115. 



i06 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

is to afford the student a setting in which to enter into a dialogue 
between the several theological disciplines and his own Ufe. It is ex- 
pected that this dialogue, going on both within the student and between 
students, will help to make clear in understanding and in practice the 
resources, methods, and meanings of religion as these are expressed 
through pastoral care. 

MiDDLER Tutorial 
The tutorial program provides a setting in which the student's under- 
standing of the problem of communication may be deepened, his 
theological knowledge integrated, and seminary experience related to 
his personal role in the Christian mission. 

Examination in the Content of Holy Scripture 
During the Middle Year, written examinations in the content of the 
English Bible will be given. Every student is required to pass these 
examinations before his graduation. 

Special Students from Other Ministries 
A program for men transferring from the ministry of other com- 
munions to the ministry of the Episcopal Church and enrolling as either 
Special or Graduate students will be arranged by consultation with 
faculty advisors. This program will include courses offered in English 
and American Church History; Ecclesiastical Polity and Canon Law; 
Theology; the History, Content, and Use of the Book of Common. 
Prayer; Ethics and Moral Theology. 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 



107 



OUTLINE OF REQUIRED COURSES* 
1963-64 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Field First Semester Hours Field 

OT I— Old Testament 3 OT 

NT I—New Testament 3 NT 

Greek — Elementary Greek 3 ST 

ST I— Introd. to Theology ... 3 CH 

PT I— Lit., The Prayer Book . 3 PT 

Church Music — 

Dean's Conference i 

Clinical Pastoral Training, summer 2 hrs. 



Second Semester Hours 

2 — Old Testament 3 

2 — Synoptic Gospels 3 

2 — Dogmatic Theology .... 3 
2 — General Church History. 3 
2 — Introd. to Pastoral Theol. 3 

Church Music I 

Dean's Conference 1 



OT 3 — Later Judaism 3 

NT 3 — Johannine Literature ... 3 
ST 3 — Dogmatic Theology .... 3 
CH 3 — General Church History 3 
PT 3 — Pastoral Care, Horn. . . 3 

Church Music — 

Middler Tutorial i 



MIDDLE YEAR 

NT 
ST 



CH 
PT 



4 — Pauline Epistles 3 

4— Ethics 3 

4— Eng. Ch. History 3 

4— Christ. Ed. & Hom 3 

Elective 2 

Church Music i 

Middler Tutorial i 



SENIOR YEAR 



NT 4 — Pauline Epistles 3 

ST s — Moral Theology 3 

CH 5— Am. Ch. Hist 2 

PT 6— Parish Adm. & Canon 

Law 3 

PT 8 — Lit., Christian Worship . 3 

Church Music — 

Elective 2 



ST 6 — Christian Apologetics .. 3 

CH 6 — Missions 2 

tHom. 3 — Homiletics 2 

Church Music I 



♦Certam courses will be shifted from normal positions to provide for sabbatical leaves 
and curriculum revision. 
tSee P. T. 5, page 114. 



io8 



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 



OUTLINE OF REQUIRED COURSES* 
1964-65 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Field First Semester Hours Field 

OT I— Old Testament 3 OT 

NT I— New Testament 3 NT 

Greek — Elementary Greek 3 ST 

ST I— Introd. to Theology ... 3 CH 

FT I— Lit., The Prayer Book . 3 VT 

Church Music — 

Dean's Conference i 

Qinical Pastoral Traming, summer 2 hrs. 

MIDDLE YEAR 

OT 3 — ^Later Judaism 3 NT 

NT 3 — ^Johannine Literature... 3 ST 

ST 3— Dogmatic Theology .... 3 CH 

CH <i— General Church History 3 PT 
PT 3 — Pastoral Care, Horn. ... 3 

Church Music — 

Middler Tutorial i 

SENIOR YEAR 

ST s— Moral Theology 3 ST 

CH s— Am. Ch. Hist 2 CH 

PT 5— Homiletics 3 ^ 

Elective 2 

Elective 2 PT 

Church Music — 



Second Semester Hours 

2 — Old Testament 3 

2 — Synoptic Gospels 3 

2 — Dogmatic Theology .... 3 
2 — General Church History. 3 
2 — Introd. to Pastoral Theol. 3 

Church Music I 

Dean's Conference i 

4 — Pauline Epistles 3 

4— Ethics 5 

4— Eng. Ch. History 3 

4 — Christ. Ed. & Horn 3 

Elective 2 

Church Music I 

Middler Tutorial 1 

6 — Christian Apologetics . . 3 

6 — Missions 2 

6 — Parish Adm. & Canon 

Law 3 

8 — Lit., Christian Worship . 3 

Elective 2 

Elective 2 

Church Music 1 



*Certain courses will be shifted from normal positions to provide for sabbatical 
leaves. Total required hours are 95, nine of which are In ungraded courses. 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY IO9 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The courses of study are divided into five major fields: Old Testa- 
ment, New Testament, Systematic Theology, Church History, and 
Pastoral Theology. Required courses are numbered from i through 
8; electives are numbered from ii onward. 

The unit by which courses are measured and according to which 
credit is given is the semester-hour. By a semester-hour is meant 
atttendance at class one hour per week for one semester. Quality points 
shall be estimated in accordance with the number of hours credit 
allotted for each course in which a grade is given; thus "A" equals 4 
X semester hours, "B" — 3 x semester hours, "C" =- 2 x semester hours, 
and so on. 

Old Testament Field 

O. T. 1-2. Old Testament History and Literature. 

A survey of the content and underlying motifs of the Old Testament in the light 
of literary, historical, and form criticism. Three hours, two semesters. Required of 
Juniors. [Mr. Griffin.] 

O. T. 3. The History and Literature of Later Judaism. 

A survey of the content and theology of the Apocrypha, Pseudepigrapha, and Dead 
Sea Scrolls. Three hours, one semester. Required of Middlers. [Mr. Griffin.] 

All Old Testament elective courses require the permission of the 
instructor for enrollment. 

O. T. 11. Religion of the Old Testament. 

A study of the leading religious ideas of the Old Testament. Two hours, one se- 
mester. Elective. [Mr. Griffin.] 

O. T. 12. Selected Courses in English Exegesis of particular books as announced. 
[Prerequisite: O. T. 1-2] 

Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Griffin.] 

O. T. 13-14. Elementary Hebrew. 

An introduction to the grammar and syntax of the Hebrew Bible, with readings in 
Genesis. A year course, three hours each semester. Elective. [Mr. Griffin.] 

O. T. 15-16. Advanced Hebrew. 

Progressively advanced readings in the Hebrew Bible with emphasis upon methods 
of exegesis. Two hours, two semesters. Elective. [Mr. Griffin.] 



New Testament Field 

Greek. A complete exposition of Greek Grammar, without reading and with limited 
vocabulary, given in the two weeks before the regular academic year opens. Some 



no THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

forty hours of class work are involved. The course Is required of all Juniors who arc 
not able to pass an examination in Greek reading and of degree candidates In other 
years who have not yet fulfilled this requirement. The use of the Greek language is 
indispensable for the complete understanding of New Testament study. During the 
first semester the grammar classes will be repeated for those students In need of further 
training, including some reading from the Greek New Testament. Credit, three hours. 
[Mr. Rhys, Mr. Turlington.] 

N. T. 1. New Testament Introduction, 

A study of the geography of Palestine, of the historical background and development 
of Judaism, and of the thought and religion of the ancient world as this affected early 
Christianity; a brief survey of the New Testament writings and of the other Christian 
literature before A.D. 150; a review of the questions of canon and text; and analysis 
of the prmciples of literary and historical criticism. There Is also some reading 
in Greek New Testament. Three hours, one semester. Required of Juniors. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N. T. 2. The Synoptic Gospels. 

Readmgs from the three synoptic gospels, with special emphasis on that of Matthew, 
and a historical reconstruction of the Ministry of Jesus. Three hours, one semester. 
Required of Juniors. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N. T. 3. Johannine Literature. 

The Fourth Gospel will be studied in exhaustive detail, and other documents 
considered in relation thereto. The Jewish, Oriental, and Hellenistic contributions to 
Christian thought will be considered, including the problems of Gnosticism, and the 
Dead Sea Scrolls. Three hours, one semester. Required of Middlers. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N. T. 4. Epistles of St. Paul. 

Romans will be read, together with sections of Philippians and Coloeslans, in 
order to outline the Apostle's contribution to Christian thought. Three hours, one 
semester. Required of Middlers. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N. T. 11. Sin and Redemption in the New Testament. 

A study of the relevant sections of the various New Testament documents for an 
understanding of the basis of the doctrine of the Atonement. This is an introductbn 
to Biblical Theology and a survey of its central theme. Two hours, one semester. 
Elective. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N. T. 12. The Epistle to the Ephesians. 

An mtensive study of this Epistle in the light of research, with consideration of its 
place In Christian history. Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr, Rhys.] 

N. T. 13-14. The Acts of the Apostles. 

An mtensive study of the early history of Christianity and the life of St. Paul as 
revealed In this document, with investigation of the varying traditions found therein. 
Two hours in each of two semesters. Elective. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N. T. 15. The Pastoral Epistles. 

A study of the authorship, background, and meaning of the three Epistles. Two 
hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Rhys.] 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY III 

N. T. 16. Epistle to the Hebrews. 

A study of the date, background, and purpose of this Epistle, with reference to prior 
theories on these points and translation and analysis of the text. Two hours, one 
semester. Elective. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N. T. 17. The Acts of the Apostles. (See N. T. 13-14 for description of course) 

Offered in 1962-63 without use of the Greek language, in place of N. T. 13-14. Three 
hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N.l'. 18. Research Seminar for S.T.M. candidates. 

A reading course with topic determined by arrangement between student and in- 
structor. Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Rhys.] 



Systematic Theology Field 

S. T. 1. Introduction to Theology. 

A lecture and discussion course designed to raise with the student the basic questions 
with which Christian theology is concerned, and to acquamt him with some of the 
more important philosophical terms and concepts. Three hours, one semester. Re- 
quired of Juniors. [1963-64, Mr. Gessell; 1964-65, Mr. Winters.] 

S. T. 2-3. Dogmatic Theology. 

A study of the cardmal doctrines of the Church showing the historical development 
of the doctrines and their organic interconnection. Three hours in each of two se- 
mesters. Required of Juniors and Middlers. [1963-64, Mr. Ralston; 1964-65, Mr. 
Winters.] 

S. T. 4. General Moral Theology. 

A consideration of the moral nature of man as it has been understood in Christian 
theological tradition, with reference to the principal systems of ethics and moral 
philosophy. Three hours, one semester. Required of Middlers. [Mr. Ralston.] 

S. T. 5. Special Moral Theology. 

An exposition and analysis of the principles in terms of which the Christian idea of 
the supernatural end of man is brought to bear upon specific cases of conscience. 
Three hours, one semester. Required of Seniors. [Mr. Ralston.] 

S. T. 6. Christian Apologetics. 

An interdepartmental seminar attempting to correlate doctrinal, ethical, and pastoral 
concerns In the presentation of the Christian faith to the world. Three hours, one 
semester. Required of Seniors. [Messrs. Ralston, Winters, and Myers.] 

•S. T. 11. Doctrmal Seminar. 

A major doctrine is considered in detail each year. Two hours, one semester. 
Elective. [Mr. Winters.] 

S. T. 12. The Ecumenical Church. 

The basis, nature, and function of the Church and the Sacramental system, looked 
at with particular concern for the problems of Church reunion. Two hours, one se- 
mester. Elective. [Mr. Winters.] 



♦Not offered In 1963-64. 



\12 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

•S. T. 13-14. Patristics. 

A seminar in the Christian thought of the patristic period; basic writings of classical 
Christian thinkers from the Apostolic Fathers to St. Augustine. Two hours in each 
of two semesters. Credit will be given for either semester separately. Elective. [Mr. 
Woods.] 

S. T. 15. The Anglican Tradition in Theology. 

A descriptive analysis of the history of Anglican theology through the end of the 
nineteenth century, and an attempt to assess the value of its particular character and 
methods. Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Ralston.] 

•S. T. 16 Anglican Apologetics in the Twentieth Century. 

Lectures and seminars, A study of the major issues in recent and contemporary 
theology as they have been reflected within Anglicanism. Two hours, one semester. 
Elective. [Mr. Ralston.] 

•S. T. 17. The Mystical Element of Religion. 

Lectures and seminars. The history and significance of mysticism are discussed 
with primary reference to the tradition of mystical experience within Christianity. 
Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Ralston.] 

S. T. 18. Contemporary Theology. 

An examination of several of the significant figures in the post-Barthian period, 
together with some of the dominant issues which characterize the present theological 
climate. Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Gessell.] 

•S. T. 19. Religious Language and Theological Method. 

The nature of our knowledge of God. An analysis of various types of analogical 
thinking, with special reference to contemporary criticism of religious language. Two 
hours, one semester. Elective. Open to students with some previous knowledge of 
philosophy. [Mr. Ralston.] 

•S. T. 20. The Theology of the Prayer Book. 

The teaching of the Church expressed in The Book of Common Prayer. Two hours, 
one semester. Elective. [Mr. Woods.] 

•S. T. 21. Christian Social Ethics. 

Seminars designed to consider particular problems of relation between the Church 
and the social order — such as: Communism, racism, nuclear war, alcoholism. Two 
hours, one semester. Elective. [Messrs. Ralston, Winters, and Gessell.] 

S. T. 22. Special Studies in Philosophical Theology. 

Lectures and seminars. The work of a particular theologian is examined in detail. 
1963-64, second semester: Friedrich von Hiigel. Two hours, one semester. Elective. 
[Mr. Winters, Mr. Ralston.] 

•S. T. 24. Ascetical Theology. 

The Christian doctrine of the Vision of God, as exemplified in the classic literature 



•Not offered in 1963-64. 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY II3 

of Christian spirituality, with special attention to the moral theology of the sacra- 
ment of penance. Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Ralston.] 

S. T. 25. Guided Research. 

Seminar or tutorial sessions to assist honors or graduate students to conduct in- 
dependent research. Two hours, one semester. Elective by arrangement with the 
appropriate instructor. 



Church History Field 

C H. 2-3. General Church History. 

The life and growth of the Church Universal. Three hours in each of two semesters. 
CM. 2 requu-ed of Juniors. C.H. 3 required of Middlers. [Mr. Allison.] 

C H. 4. English Church History. 

The development of Christianity in England from its beginning, with special emphasis 
upon the distinctive characteristics of Anglicanism. Thre* hours, one semester. Re- 
quired of Middlers. [Mr. Allison.] 

C. H. 5. American Church History. 

The history of Christianity in America, with special attention to the Protestant 
Episcopal Church. Two hours, one semester. Required of Seniors. [Mr. Allison.] 

C. H. 6. The Christian Mission. 

A review of the expansion of Christianity from the beginning; the motives, methods, 
and present opportunities of the Church's Mission. Two hours, one semester. Re- 
quired of Seniors. [Mr. Allison.] 

C. H. 11. 17th Century Anglicanism. 

A study of Anglicanism as it is exemplified in the writings of 17th century divines, 
using primary sources. Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Allison.] 

C. H. 12. 19th Century Anglicanism. 

A study of issues and events of the 19th century English Church with special 
attention to the issues of Biblical criticism, science, and secularism. Two hours, one 
semester. Elective. [Mr. Allison.] 

C. H. 14. Christianity and Contemporary Literature. 

A study of the religious issues as they are shown in the writings of modem poets, 
novelists, dramatists, and critics. Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Allison.] 



Pastoral Theology Field 

P. T. 1. Liturgies, The Book of Common Prayer. 

The history, contents, and use of the Book of Common Prayer; practical instruction 
in the mmistratlon of the services of the church. Three hours, one semester. Re- 
quired of Juniors. [Mr. Woods.] 



114 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Additional training in ministration is afforded students throughout the theological 
course through participation in the services of St. Luke's Chapel. Additional practice 
and Individual instruction will be required of those with special speech or readmg 
problems. 

P. T. 2. Introduction to Pastoral Theology. 

The functional aspects of the Christian ministry together with its cultural and 
theological background. Three hours, second semester. Required of Juniors. [Mr. 

Gessell, Mr. Merrill.] 

P. T. 3. Pastoral Care and Homiletics. 

The function of the pastoral office in the life of the Church and its relation to the 
Christian ministry. Practice in expository preaching. Three hours, first semester. 
Required of Middlers. [Mr. Merrill, Mr. Gessell.] 

P. T. 4. The Curriculum for Christian Education and Homiletics. 

The function of the parish as teacher and the dynamics of the parish educational 
program. Practice in preaching and the liturgical year. Three hours, second semester. 
Required of MIddlers. [Mr. Myers.] 

P. T. 5. Homiletics. 

Preaching as proclamation; the Gospel In relation to the contemporary situation. 
Three hours, first semester. Offered In 1963-64 as Hom. 3; two hours, second semester. 
Required of Seniors. [Mr. Myers.] 

P. T. 6. Parish Administration and Canon Law. 

The aims, principles, and methods of the pastoral ministry. The minister's work 
as pastor, teacher, and priest. Canon law and the practical phases of parish 
management. Three hours, one semester. Required of Seniors. [Mr. Alexander.] 

P. T. 8. Liturgies, Christian Worship. 

Theology of worship; the Jewish background; the origin and development of 
Christian liturgical forms. Primary emphasis is given to the history, meanmg, and use 
of the liturgies of Holy Baptism and the Eucharist. Three hours, one semester. 
Required of Seniors. [Mr. Woods.] 

P. T. 11. Christian Education. Course Structure and Design. 

Practice under supervision In planning and teaching church school classes, adult and 
youth groups. Two hours, second semester. Elective. [Mr. Myers.] 

P. T. 12. Pastoral Counseling. 

The principles of counseling as reflected in case studies. Preparation and resources 
for pastoral counseling. Two hours, second semester. Elective, recommended for 
seniors. [Mr. Woods.] 

P. T. 13. The Choral Service. 

Advanced training in the liturgical music for Morning and Evening Prayer, the 
Litany, and the Holy Communion. One hour, first semester. Elective. [Mr. Running.] 

P. T. 15. Guided Research. 

Seminar in pastoral theology. Two hours, one semester. Elective by permission of 
the Instructor. 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY II5 

Cliurch Music. 

The fundamentals of music and basic principles of voice production. Study and use 
of the Hymnal 1940, the Psalter, and the Choral Service. Required of all students, 
three years. One hour tredit each year. [Mr. Running.] 

•Clinical Pastoral Training. 

Work under the Council for Clinical Training for one summer quarter in general 
hospitals, mental hospitals, or penal institutions. Required of all students, preferably 
between the Junior and Middler years. Clinical Training fee Is $100, payable second 
semester of the first year. Two hours credit. 



Supplementary Electives 
Given as Announced 

College Course 305-306. Comparative Religion. 

First semester: primitive and ancient religion; the religions of India and the Far 
East, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto. Second 
semester: religions of the Near East, mcluding Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. 
Prerequisite: a year of religion or philosophy. Three hours, each semester. Elective. 
[Mr. Collins.] 

P. R. S. 16. A Philosophy of Science. 

Studies in the relation of science, philosophy, and religion. One hour, one semester. 
Elective. [Mr. McCrady.] 

Lat'ji 11-12. Ecclesiastical Latin. 

A study of the fundamentals of the Latin language leading to selected readings 
from the Vulgate Bible and from a variety of early Christian and medieval writers. 
Two hours, each semester. Elective. [Mr. Binnicker.] 

Theological Bibliography. 

Includes the preparation of a bibliography, documentation, and introduction to the 
literature of the several theological disciplines. Two hours, one semester. [Mr. 
Camp.] 

Liturgical Art. 

An Introduction to understandmg the background and intention of Christian 
Liturgical Art; its continuity, the mediums of expression and its place In the total 
field of art. Two hours, one semester. Offered In 1963-64. [Mr. Barrett.] 



*See also Clinical Pastoral Training page 105. With permission of the Director of 
Field Work, certain other supervised trainmg programs are available to interested stu- 
dents. 



Il6 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

ACTIVITIES 

The Saint Luke's Journal of Theology 
This publication is issued three times during the academic year and 
is now in its seventh year as a continuing organ for theological discus- 
sion. It is edited and managed by the students of St. Luke's with the 
help of a faculty advisory committee. 

The St. Luke's Society 
The student body of the School of Theology, through the organization 
of The St. Luke's Society, sponsors many activities including a lecture 
series, missionary work, social activities, intramural athletics, publica- 
tions, and inter-seminary activities. 

Special Classes for Students' Wives 
Each semester a series of five lectures is offered by a faculty member 
for all student wives. These presentations are so arranged that in the 
course of three years a student wife has the opportunity to become ac- 
quainted with the major fields of study in the seminary curriculum. 

Lectures and Concerts 

In addition to the regular lecture series sponsored by The Univer- 
sity OF THE South, the School of Theology offers to the student body 
and community two memorial lectureships. The William P. DuBose 
Lecturer in the fall of 1963 was the Rev. Dr. Eugene Fairweather of 
Trinity College, Toronto, Ontario. The Samuel Marshall Beattie 
Lecturer in the spring of 1964 was also the duPont Lecturer, the Rev. 
Dr. B. D. Napier of Yale Divinity School, New Haven, Connecticut. 

The University has an endowed lecture program known as the duPont 
Lectures. The lecturers, who are of international reputation, are 
chosen to represent the various fields of knowledge with particular re- 
gard to the fields of theology, humanities and languages, natural science, 
and social science. Many organizations and departments sponsor 
visiting lecturers in both general and particular fields throughout the 
year. 

The Concerts Committee, under faculty direction, presents annually 
a varied program of music, dance, drama, and films featuring dis- 
tinguished artists. Organizations such as the German Club, Jazz 
Society, Choir, Glee Club, Purple Masque, and the Sewanee Com- 
munity Theatre not only provide entertainment, but also permit par- 
ticipation by interested students. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY II7 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 
Sewanee, Tennessee 

The Very Rev. George Mover Alexander, D.D., S.T.D., Dean 

The Rev. Massey H. Shepherd, Jr., 
Ph.D., S.T.D., D.D., Litt.D., Director 

The University of the South established its Graduate School of 
Theology in 1937 to afford to clergymen an opportunity for post- 
ordination study, in close personal contact with recognized leaders of 
theological knowledge and interpretation. 

The sessions of the School are held for five weeks every summer, 
usually in July and August. Because of this fact, it is possible to in- 
vite scholars from other institutions to be members of the faculty; and 
the personnel of the faculty changes considerably from year to year. 
Thus the School is a rendezvous of teachers and scholars, as well as 
a community of men who wish to continue and enrich their education 
but could not otherwise do so. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Regular Students take courses for academic credit, looking toward 
the granting of a degree. Most of them find it impracticable to take 
more than three courses for credit at one session of the School; and 
the requirements for a degree are designed in accordance with this fact. 

Besides regular candidates for a degree, men who have an acceptable 
background of theological training may be admitted as special stu- 
dents. Especially qualified students in recognized schools of Theology 
may be admitted, but only with the express permission of the schools 
in which they are enrolled and in agreement with these schools In re- 
gard to any acceptance of credit for work done in the Graduate School. 

Auditors are permitted to attend all lectures but receive no academic 
credit. Regular students may audit the lectures in courses for which 
they are not receiving academic credit. 



Il8 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 
The program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Divinity in this 
School has been suspended, and no new applications for entrance upon 
such program will now be accepted. But any regular Seminary of the 
Church is free to grant to its applicants for the B.D. degree credit for 
courses taken in the Graduate School. This does not preclude con- 
tinuation of work thereon by those already accepted as Candidates for 
that degree, or the granting of the degree upon satisfactory completion 
of the work required. 

The Degree of Master of Sacred Theology* 

1. An Applicant for the Master of Sacred Theology degree must possess the degree 
of Bachelor of Divinity (or Th.B. or S.T.B.). 

2. An Applicant becomes a Candidate for the Master's degree by vote of the 
Faculty of the Graduate School of Theology after he has completed six courses In 
residence In the Graduate School. 

3. The recipient of this degree must have completed not less than nine courses of 
graduate work In addition to any work done in fulfillment of requirements for the 
Bachelor of Divinity degree. 

4. These courses must be completed within a period of not less than three years 
and not more than seven years, unless the time be extended by the Faculty. 

5. At least five courses must be in the same field of study and shall constitute a 
"major group of studies." At least two courses must be taken in a different field 
from the major. 

6. The applicant must present a satisfactory thesis upon a subject directly connected 
with his major group of studies. 

7. In addition to course examinations, he shall pass satisfactorily a general ex- 
ammatlon in the subject of his major group of studies. The scope of this general 
examination shall be prescribed at the time of the Candidate's completion of all re- 
quired courses for the degree. 

8. The Master's degree will not be conferred honoris causa. 

9. Candidates for degrees who were accepted as such under older regulations may 
be graduated in accordance with the agreement then existing. 

10. In cases where the Faculty has voted an extension of time to Candidates who 
have not completed requirements in the appointed time, the Faculty shall have the 
right to impose such additional requirements as they may deem necessary. 

A course In the School describes approximately the equivalent of 
two semester-hours. Including lectures and research work, it will en- 
tail about ninety hours of work during the five weeks. 



*See also page 102 for S. T. M. requirements, School of Theology. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY II9 

ACCOMMODATIONS 

Accommodations for single men will be in St. Luke's Hall or other 
University buildings. Single men must provide their own bed linen and 
towels, as must married men bringing families for University furnished 
housing. 

A limited number of quarters for families can be provided. These 
are of three classes: 

*i. Woodland apartments, old barracks-type, military surplus build- 
ings with three units in each, are normally used by married stu- 
dents. They include combination living and dining room, two small 
bedrooms, and a bath. Minimum dormitory furnishings are included. 
Rental for these units is ^55 for the full session. The University stone 
apartments with University furniture rent for ^60 and the stone houses 
for $65. These rents include ^5 for water and electricity. The new 
stone dormitory close to St. Luke's Hall, named Benedict Hall, has 
been reserved for the Graduate School. It has two-room suites which 
can accommodate families of four. Each large motel-like room has two 
innerspring beds with a private bath for each suite. Rental for the 
suites is ^60 for the session. 

2. Units in the Woodland area may be sublet, furnished, from mar- 
ried students, for rents ranging from $80 to $120 for the five week 
period. 

3. Faculty homes and fraternity houses vacant for the summer may 
be rented for the session. Rents are apt to be $150 to ^200 for these 
accommodations. 

Address your inquiry to the Dean's Office, stating the size of your 
family and what you wish to pay. 

A non-returnable deposit of $15.00 is required with each application. 
This will be credited to Graduate School expenses. 

BOARD 

The cost of board for the session for students' families is $95.00 for 
each adult person. Children of school age may board for $yo for the 
session. The cost of board for children under six years of age is $.50 per 
meal, or $50.00 for the session. 

For those who do not wish to take all meals in the University dining 



•Pets will not be permitted in Woodland apartments. 



120 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

hall, the costs must be arranged for at registration. Separate meals 

for each person over the five-week period are: 

Breakfast $25.00 

Lunch 32.50 

Dinner 40.00 

The prices of single meals are as follows: 

Breakfast $ 75 

Lunch ijoo 

Dinner 1.25 



FEES 

The Fees for the summer session are as follows: 

Registration and tuition $ 75.00 

Board and room, not mcluding linen, at St. Luke's 130.00 

(Room without board, $40.00 for session) 

Total $205.00 



THE SUMMER SESSION OF 1963 
July 10 — ^August 14 

THE FACULTY 

The Very Rev. GEORGE MOVER ALEXANDER, DX)., S.TX)., D^an 

The Rev. MASSEY HAMILTON SHEPHERD, JR., Ph.D., S.TD., DX)., LittX). 

Diuctor 
Professor of Liturgies, The Church Divinity School of the Pacific, 
Berkeley, California 

Mr. JOHN SEDBERRY MARSHALL, Ph.D. 

Professor of Philosophy, The University of the South, 

Sewanee, Tennessee 

The Rev. Canon HUGH GERARD GIBSON HERKLOTS, M.A. (Cantab.) 

Residentiary Canon of Peterborough Cathedral and Moderator 

of the Church Training Colleges, 

Peterborough, England 

The Ret. Canon GEORGE COLLISS BOARDMAN DAVIES, M.A., D.D. (Cu^tab ) 

Professor of Ecclesiastical History, Trinity College, 

and Canon and Treasurer of St. Patrick's Cathedral, 

Dublin, Ireland 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 121 

Professor the Rev. WILLIAM MOELWYN MERCHANT, MA., Lrrr.D. 

Head of the Department of English, University of Exeter, 

England 

The Rev. JOHN YOSHIMITSU ENDO, B.D., S.T.M. 
Professor of Ethics, Central Theological College, Tokyo 



COURSES OFFERED 1963 

Church History 63. Early Christian Worship. 

The background of Christian worship in Judaism and the Graeco-Roman world; 
problems of the Last Supper; development of worship in the apostolic age. (This 
course also counts as a New Testament elective.) [Mr. Shepherd.] 

Church History 37. Studies in the Anglican Evangelical Movement. 

A survey of the personalities, contribution, and achievements of Evangelicals during 
the past two hundred years. [Mr. Davies.] 

Church History 39. Frontiers in Anglican History. 

Steps by which the Anglican Communion emerged from the missionary outreach, 
first of the Church of England, and then of the Churches which it had founded; 
special attention to the effects of this development upon the Church from which the 
missionaries went out; questions of the future of the Anglican Communion. [Mr. 
Herklots.] 

Church History 92. The Development of Religious and Liturgical Drama. 

Exammation of the nature of religious drama from a consideration of Greek 
tragedy through the liturgical drama of the Middle Ages to its influence on the 
Shakespearean public theatre; also consideration of the revival of religious drama in 
the twentieth century and a comparison of its themes with the early theatre. [Mr. 
Merchant.] 

Theology 33. The Anglicanism of Richard Hooker. 

A study of those aspects of Hooker which most influenced the future history of 
Anglican Thought. [Mr. Marshall.] 

Theology 65. Christian Social Ethics. 

Special emphasis on Justice, the Law, and the Christian idea of society. [Mr. 
Ei»do.] 



THE SUMMER SESSION OF 1964 
July 15 — ^August 19 

THE FACULTY 
The Very Rev. GEORGE MOVER ALEXANDER, D.D., S.TD., Dean 

The Rev. MASSEY HAMILTON SHEPHERD, JR., Ph.D., S.T.D., DX)., Lrrr.D. 

Dirfctof 

Professor of Liturgies, The Church Divinity School of the Pacific, 

Berkeley, California 



122 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH J 

The Rev. SHUNJI FORREST NISHI, Ph.D. I 

Episcopal Chaplain to Faculty and Graduate Students at the University of Califoraiaj < 

Lecturer and Tutor in The Church Divinity School of the Pacific, h 

Berkeley, California "i 

Mr. GLANVILLE DOWNEY, Ph.D. ' 

Professor of Byzantine Literature, Dumbarton Oaks, Harvard University, '; 
Washington, D. C. 

The Rev. JOHN HOWARD WINSLOW RHYS, S.T.M., Th.D. j 

Professor of New Testament, The School of Theology, ^ 

University of the Soxjth, Sewanee, Tennessee i 

The Rev. LAWRENCE LORD BROWN, MA., D.D. I 

Professor of Church History and Assistant Dean, | 

The Episcopal Theological Seminary of the Southwest, Austin, Texas; * 

Editor, Historical Magazine of the Frotestant Episcopal Church \ 



The Rev. MILTON REESE LEROY, B.D., S.T.M. 

Professor and Supervisor of Christian Education, 
Saint Margaret's House, Berkeley, California 



COURSES OFFERED 1964 

New Testament 20. The Gospel According to Matthew. 

Advanced introduttion and exposition. [Mr. Rhys.] 

New Testament 41. The Catholic Epistles. 

An analysis of the general epistles of the New Testament and their relation to the 
life and thought of Christianity in the post-apostolic age. [Mr. Shepherd.] 

Church History 35. The English Reformation to 1570. 

A study of the Reformation Settlement In England against the background of social,^ 
political, economic, and intellectual developments In the period. [Mr. Brown.] 

Church History 48. The Church and the City in the Roman Empire. 

A study of the Church and the world in the Graeco-Roman city, illustrating the 
problems the Church encountered, and the methods it employed In dealing with the 
pagan elements in the structure and life of the city. [Mr. Downey.] 

TTieology 48. Faith and Order in the Ecumenical Movement. 

The historical background for 'Faith and Order,' and particularly the theological 
issues, the changes and developments in the theological orientation in the Ecumenical 
Movement as evidenced in 'Faith and Order.' [Mr. Nishi.] 

Theology 72. The Christian Mission In Changing Cultures. 

A study of the mission of the Church in areas of rapid social, political and economic 
change. [Mr. LeRoy.] 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY I23 

BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR COURSES— 1964 

N. T. 20. The Gospel According to Matthew (Rhys) 

Krister Stendahl, The School of St. Matthew and Its Use of the Old Testament, 
Uppsala: C. W. K. Gleerup, 1954. 

Birger Gerhardsson, Memory and Manuscript, Oral Tradition and Written Trans- 
mission in Rabbinic Judaism and Early Christianity. Uppsala: C. W. K. Gleerup, 1961. 

Giinther Bornkamm and others, Tradition and Interpretation in Matthew. West- 
mmster Press, 1963. 

Hans Wlndlsch, The Meaning of the Sermon on the Mount. Westminster Press, 1951. 

N. T. 41. The Catholic Epistles (Shepherd) 

C. H. Dodd, The Johannine Epistles. Moffatt Commentaries. Harpers, 1946. 

F. W. Beare, The First Epistle of Peter. Basil Blackwood, 1947. 
The Interpreter's Bible. Vol. 12. Abingdon Press, 1957. 

C. H. 35. The English Reformation (Brown) 

T. M. Parker, The English Reformation to 1558. The Home University of Modem 
Knowledge, No. 217. Oxford University Press, 1950. 

E. T. Davies, Episcopacy and Royal Supremacy in the Church of England in the 
XVI Century. Blackwell, 1950. 

Conyears Read, Social and Political Forces in the English Reformation. Elzevier 
Press, 1953. 

G. R. Elton, England under the Tudors. Methuen, 1955. 

C. H. 48. The Church and the City in the Roman Empire (Downey) 

C. J. Cadoux, The Early Church and the World. T. and T. Clark, 1925; reprmted 
1955. 

The Politics of Aristotle, translated by Ernest Barker. Oxford University Press, 
1948; reprinted as Galaxy paperback. Required for course. 

From Alexander to Constantine: Passages and Documents Illustrating the History 
of Social and Political Ideas, 336 B. C. — A. D. 337, translated by Ernest Barker. 
Oxford University Press, 1959. 

St. Augustine's City of God, abridged and translated by J. W. C. Wand. Oxford 
University Press, 1963. Required for course. 

Th. 48. Faith and Order in the Ecumenical Movement (Nishi) 

Ruth Rouse and Stephen Neill, History of the Ecumenical Movement, 1^17-1948^ 
S. P. C. K., 1954. 
Paul Minear (ed.), Faith and Order Findings. Augsburg Publishing House, 1963. 
Reports of the World Conferences on Faith and Order (if and when available). 

Th. 72. The Christian Mission in Changing Cultures (LeRoy) 

Richard Niebuhr, Christ and Culture. Harpers, 1951; reprinted as Harper Torch- 
book paperback. 
Richard Niebuhr, Radical Monotheism and Western Culture. Harpers, i960. 
Egbert de Vries, Man in Rapid Social Change. Doubleday, 1961. 
Paul Abrecht, The Churches and Rapid Social Change. Doubleday, 1961. 
G. H. Anderson, The Theology of Christian Mission. McGraw-Hill, 1961. 



SUMMER INSTITUTE 

OF 

SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 



126 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

SUMMER INSTITUTE 

The Summer Institute of Science and Mathematics 

FOR Secondary School Teachers 

Supported by the National Science Foundation 

The University of the South in 1959 established the degree ot 
Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.). The faculty was aware that 
there was little opportunity for secondary school teachers to work for 
an advanced degree other than in the field of education or in a specific 
subject. Accordingly, in i960 the National Science Foundation was 
requested to support a sequential program of study leading to a Mas- 
ter's degree in the basic sciences. The request was granted, the 
Summer Institute was in session from June 26 to August 19, 196 1, and 
renewals of the grant have made it possible to continue the program. 

The dates for the 1964 Summer Institute are June 22 to August 15. 

Major Objectives of the Institute 

1. To offer quality courses in mathematics and science in order to 
strengthen the subject-matter competence of the participants. 

2. To make it possible for the members of the Institute to work toward 
an advanced degree in content courses rather than in method courses. 

3. To acquaint the high school teachers by means of seminars, special 
lectures, trips, and informal discussions with modern developments 
in science and mathematics. 

Degree Requirements 

A minimum of 30 semester hours, including a thesis, is required for 
the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching. Three summers, or the 
equivalent, in residence are necessary. A candidate for the M.A.T. 
degree must complete the following requirements: 
(i) Basic Courses. 

(a) Mathematics 151-S, (b) Biology 151-S, (c) Chemistry 151-S, 
(d) Physics 151-S, and (e) History of Science 151-S. 
(2) Advanced Study. 

(a) Mathematics 351-S. (b) Such additional advanced courses as 
may be prescribed by the candidate's major department. The number 
of courses required will depend upon the candidate's qualifications. 



SUMMER INSTITUTE \^'^ 

(c) An acceptable thesis or research project in a field in which the 
candidate has taken an advanced course. The department in which 
this requirement is fulfilled will be referred to as the candidate's major 
department. A faculty committee from the major department will 
determine if a candidate has successfully completed this requirement. 

(d) Satisfactory completion of a final examination administered by 
the major department. 

Granting of a Degree 

At any time after satisfactory completion of the basic course require- 
ments, a participant may apply to one of the departments for admission 
to candidacy for a degree. Such application may be made either before 
or after completion of advanced courses. If accepted by the depart- 
ment to which application is made, the candidate shall then initiate re- 
search and advanced study as prescribed by that (major) department , 
in fulfillment of the thesis requirement. 

After completion of all requirements, the candidate's major depart- 
ment shall recommend to the University Senate that the degree of 
Master of Arts in Teaching be granted. 

Sequences of CotmsEs 

The order In which the courses are to be taken shall be determined 
by the participant and the Institute faculty on an Individual basis. No 
rigid sequence of courses shall be required, except that the advanced 
work requirements normally shall follow completion of the basic 
courses. 

Normal Time Required 

The program is designed for completion of the degree requirements 
in four summers. Applicants with a strong background In a particular 
subject may satisfy the basic course requirement In that subject by de- 
partmental examination. The number of credits that can be satisfied 
in this manner will be limited to eight semester hours. In the usual 
case, participants take two courses per summer. 

Number of Participants 

As no rigid sequence of courses will be required, a participant may 
enroll in the program at the beginning of any summer. It is planned 
to maintain the number of participants at about fifty. After the first 



128 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

summer (and each succeeding summer), the number of returning par- 
ticipants shall be determined by advanced registration; new applicants 
shall then be considered until the desired number (50) of participants 
has been accepted. It should be clearly understood that neither The 
University of the South nor the National Science Foundation can 
guarantee that this Institute will be continued in subsequent summers. 

Courses of Instruction 

A course In a laboratory science provides 5 hours of lectures, an hour 
seminar, and 6 hours of laboratory per week. Four semester hours 
of credit may be obtained. 

A course in mathematics provides 5 hours of lectures and an hour 
seminar per week. Three semester hours of credit may be obtained. 

Basic Courses 

Biology 151-S. 

A course stressing the modern aspects of bioecology. The laboratory will deal with 
the role of the environment in the energy relations of organisms. Cellular physiology 
will be introduced in this course. 

Chemistry 151-S. 

A course emphasizing the modem aspects of inorganic chemistry. The basic concepts 
m atomic and molecular structure and their relation to chemical behavior will be 
studied. Selected laboratory experiments will be performed. 

History of Science 151-S. 

A course consisting of reading and discussion of original sources. The contributions 
of science to the cultural heritage will be stressed. 

Mathematics 151-S. 

A modern unified course includmg such topics as the concept of function, analytic 
geometry, trigonometry, and an introduction to the calculus. 

Physics 151-S. 

An elementary course in modern physics including mechanics, heat, sound, electricity^ 
magnetism, and optics. The fundamentals of atomic and nuclear physics will be intro- 
duced. The laboratory affords an opportunity for training m experimental procedures^ 

Advanced Courses 

Biology 553-S (Evolution and Genetics). 

A course designed for advanced participants. Modern aspects of population genetics 
and biochemical genetics will be stressed. The fundamentals of neo-Darwinism will 
be included. Not offered in 1964. 



SUMMER INSTITUTE 129 

Mathematics 351-S (Finite Nfathematics). 

Sets, the relation of sets to symbolic logic, probability theory, vectors, and matrices. 
The text for this course will be INTRODUCTION TO FINITE MATHEMATICS 
by Kemeny, Snell, and Thompson. 

Radioisotopes 551-S (Basic Theory and Techniques). 

The first part of this course will be taken by all students who enroll, 'fhe basic 
phenomena involved in radioactivity and the production and use of radioisotopes will 
be studied. Laboratory experiments will be given to demonstrate the detection and 
safe handling of radioactive materials. 

In the second part, the student will elect to concentrate his study in one of the 
laboratory sciences. Depending upon the science chosen, the participant will receive 
credit for Biology SSi-S, Chemistry 551-S, or Physics 551-S. The lectures and labora- 
tory in this part of the course will be designed to demonstrate the applications of 
radioisotopes to a particular science. 

Chemistry 552-S (Topics in Analytical Chemistry). 

An advanced library and laboratory study In Analytical Chemistry under the 
direction of one or more of the chemistry staflF. 

Chemistry 553-S (Topics in Organic and Physical Chemistry). 

An advanced library and laboratory study In Organic and Physical Chemistry under 
the direction of one or more of the chemistry staff. Not offered m 1964. 

Mathematics 552-S (Modem Algebra). 

An mtroductlon to the standard algebraic structures: groups, rings, fields, mtegral 
domains. Particular attention paid to commutative algebra relevant to secondary 
school work. 

Mathematics 553-S (Mathematical Analysis). 

An Introduction to mathematical analysis with an emphasis on those properties of 
real numbers which are relevant to secondary school mathematics. Not offered m 1964. 

Physics 552-S (Topics in Advanced Physics). 

Selected fields according to the interests of physics majors; e.g., atomic and nuclear 
physics, electronics, optics, etc. 

Physics 553-S (Topics in Advanced Physics). 

Fundamental principles of electric and magnetic fields; electrostatic fields. Gauss's 
Law; scalar potential solutions of electrostatic problems, dipole theory of dielectrics; 
magnetic effects of currents, vector potential, forces on moving charges, dipole theory 
of magnetic materials. Not offered In 1964. 

Biology 552-S (Advanced Botany). 

Taxonomy of vascular plants. Locally collected specimens will be used to study 
identification, nomenclature, phylogeny and distribution of typical plant families. 



130 the university of the south 

Staff of the Institute (1964) 

Biology: Harry C. Yeatman, PhX)., George S. Ramseur, Ph.D. 

Chemistry: David B. Camp. Ph.D. 

History of Science: David McQueen, MA. 

Physics: Robert L. Petry, PhX)., William T. Allen, PhD. 

Mathematics: S. Alexander McLeod, M.A., James T. Cross, Ph D 

Radioisotopes: H. Malcolm Owen, Ph.D. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 



132 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences may receive financial 
assistance in the form of scholarships, jobs, or loans, or a combination 
of these. No scholarship will be awarded except with the approval of 
the College Committee on Admissions and Scholarships. 

Scholarships are awarded to students in the College by the Vice- 
Chancellor upon nomination by the Faculty Committee on Admissions 
and Scholarships. Special scholarships listed below are awarded upon 
nomination of the persons designated, with the approval of the Com- 
mittee. 

SPECIAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

The following scholarships are awarded by the Vice-Chancellor to candidates 
nommated by the authorities named in the individual grants. In order to retain 
these scholarships, the recipients must meet the same academic requirements as other 
scholarship holders. 

If those designated to nominate candidates for any of these scholarships have not 
made their nominations thirty days before the opening of school, the scholarships 
will be awarded for that year by the Vice-Chancellor in the same manner as other 
University scholarships. 

The Rosa C. Alien Scholarship 

The income from a fund of $14,000, for the benefit of Christian education. Re- 
cipients shall be nominated by the Rector of Christ Church, Houston, Texas, and 
must be resident in the Diocese of Texas. 

The Alston Memorial Scholarship 

The Income from $67,056.30, the bequest of Mrs. Caro duBIgnon Alston of Atlanta, 
Georgia, to provide one or more scholarships, the recipients of which are to be 
chosen by the Bishop of the Diocese of Atlanta and the Rector of St. Luke's Episcopal 
Church, Atlanta, Georgia. The beneficiaries of the scholarships shall be students 
studying for the ministry either in the College of Arts and Sciences or m the School 
of Theology of The University of the South. 

The Abel Seymour and Eliza Scott Baldwin Scholarship 

A fund of $19,179.34 established by the Executors and Trustees under the will of 
Eliza Scott Baldwin, of Duval County, Florida. The mcome Is to be used for 
scholarships for boys who are residents of the City of Jacksonville, Florida. Bene- 
ficiaries to be nominated by the Rt. Rev. Frank A. Juhan, D.D., formerly Bishop of 
Florida. 

The Robert V. Bodfish Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $3,295, established by the family and friends of Robert V. Bodfish, 
an alumnus of this University, who lost his life in a tragic accident. Beneficiaries are 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE COLLEGE I33 

to be nominated by the Rev. James Savoy, DJD. Should he make no nomination, the 
nomination may be made by the Bishops in the Diocese of Tennessee, or by the 
Vice-Chancellor. 

The George Nexsen Brady Scholarship 

The income from $6,000, the gift of R. McClelland Brady and Mary A. Berry, 
of Detroit, Mich., as a memorial to their father, George Nexsen Brady, toward the 
expenses of a worthy student in the University, preferably a postulant or a candidate 
for Holy Orders, the beneficiary to be nominated by the Bishop of the Diocese of 
Michigan; or by the Vice-Chancellor of the University in the event of no nomination 
being made by said Bishop prior to thirty days before the opening of the school 
term. 

The Margaret E. Bridgers Scholarship 

The income from $6,000, to educate one or more deservmg young men of promise 
in need of financial aid, said beneficiary to be selected and nominated by the rector 
of St. James's Church, Wilmington, N. C. 

The Ezzell Dobson Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $5,000 established by Mr. and Mrs. Matt H. Dobson, Jr., m 
memory of their son, James Ezzell Dobson, who, as a senior student in the University, 
was killed In an automobile accident April 4, 1947. This Scholarship in the aca- 
demic course is to be awarded upon nomination by Sophia Ezzell Dobson and Matt 
H. Dobson, Jr., or their descendants. If no choice Is made by them, the Vice- 
Chancellor is to award this Scholarship to a student of fine character and academic 
attainment. It is desired that the recipients of this Scholarship will endeavor to ad- 
here to the high traditions of the University and in so doing serve for the betterment 
of their fellow man. 

The Jessie Ball duPont Scholarship 

The Income from $273,562, established by Mrs. Jessie Ball duPont in 1958, to assist 
in the education of worthy students at The University of the South. 

The Jessie Ball duPont-Frank A. Juhan Scholarship 

The income from $185,303, to aid worthy and needy students nominated by Bishop 
Frank A. Juhan or whomever Bishop Juhan may designate. In the event that all 
available funds are not utilized by Bishop Juhan, other beneficiaries may be appointed 
by the Vice-Chancellor. 

These scholarships are outright gifts, but the donor hopes that the recipients will 
later pass along the same amount that they have received to some worthy student to 
assist in financing his education. 

The Dr. William Egleston Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, established by the will of Dr. William Egleston of 
Hartsville, South Carolina. The beneficiary shall be nominated by the Bishop of 
South Carolina; but if the Bishop of South Carolina does not nominate any one, the 
nomination may be made by the Bishop of Upper South Carolina, or in default 
thereof, by the Vice-Chancellor. 



134 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The George William Gillespie Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $10,035, contributed by the members of St. Mark's Church, San An- 
tonio, Texas, as a memorial to George William Gillespie, a former student in this 
University. Beneficiary to be nominated by the Rector of St. Mark's Church, San 
Antonio, Texas. In the event that St. Mark's does not make a recommendation, the 
nomination is to be made by the Vice-Chancellor of the University. 

The Laura Hoadley Humphrey Scholarship 

The income from $6,ioo, the bequest of Mrs. Laura Hoadley Humphrey of La 
Grange, Georgia, for a postulant or postulants from the Diocese of Atlanta and 
nommated by the Bishop of Atlanta. The beneficaries are "morally bound to serve 
said Diocese" after their ordination for the time equivalent to that during which they 
were beneficiaries. 

The W. Lloyd Hunt Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $S,ooo, established 1929, by Mrs. Laura G. Hunt, of Asheville, 
N, C, in memory of her husband. For postulants for Holy Orders; the beneficiary 
to be designated by the Rector of Trinity Church, Asheville, N. C, or by the Vice- 
Chancellor of the University in case the designation is not made on or before 
September i. 

The Mighell Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $31,127.70, the gift of Mabel Mighell Moffat of Mobile, Alabama, as 
a memorial to her father, Joseph Richard Mighell, and her great nephew, Joseph Rich- 
ard Mighell IV. Hie income is to be used preferably for young men from Christ Church 
Parish, Mobile; the second preference is for applicants from Mobile Coxmty, Alabama. 
In case no qualified candidate applies in any given year from either named place, the 
beneficiary is to be designated by the Bishop of Alabama as some boy within the 
Episcopal Diocese of Alabama. 

The David Rose Scholarship 

The income from a fund of $i,7S0, established by Mr. Albert P. Rose of Nash- 
ville, Tennessee. The beneficiary to be designated by the Rt. Rev. David Rose. If he 
does not appoint a beneficiary, Mr. Albert P. Rose may do so. 

The Benjamin Strother Memorial Scholarship 

The Income from $5,000, established 1926, by Mrs. Lucy R. Strother, of Columbia, 
S. C, in memory of her son. Nommatlons to be made by the Ecclesiastical Authority 
of the Diocese of Upper South Carolina from among worthy boys resident in said 
Diocese, preference being given to boys of Edgefield County. 

The Herbert Tutwiler Memorial Scholarship 

The income from a fund of $23,500, established In 1949 by the wife of Mr. Her- 
bert Tutwiler of Birmingham, Alabama, to be used in payment of expenses Incident 
tt' a regular course of study In the College. The beneficiary to be a young man of 
character and intellectual promise and a resident of the state of Alabama; first con- 
sideration being given to candidates from Mr. Tutwiler's home parish, the Church cf 
the Advent In Birmingham, then to candidates from Jefferson County. The beneficiary 
to be designated by the Bishop of Alabama. 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE COLLEGE I35 

The Morgan W. Walker Scholarship 

The income from a fund of $2,500, established by Mr. Morgan W. Walker of 
Alexandria, Louisiana. To be used for the aid of students from the Diocese of Lou- 
isiana at The University of the South. The beneficiary to be designated by the 
Bishop of Louisiana. 

The Fred G. Yerkes, Jr., Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the gift of Mr. and Mrs. Fred G. Yerkes, Senior, in de- 
votion to their son, the Reverend Fred G. Yerkes, Jr., to be used in the payment of 
the expenses of a postulant or candidate for Holy Orders from the Diocese of Florida, 
preparing for the Sacred Ministry at The University of the South, and to be awarded 
by the Bishop of the Diocese of Florida or by the Vice-Chancellor of The University 
OF THE South. 

The Fred G. Yerkes, Senior, Scholarship 

ITie income from $5,000, the gift of the Reverend Fred G. Yerkes in memory 
of his father, Fred G. Yerkes, Senior; to be used in the payment of the expenses ol 
a postulant or candidate for Holy Orders, preferably from the Diocese of Florida, 
preparmg for the Sacred Ministry at The University of the South, and to be awarded 
by the Bishop of the Diocese of Florida or by the Vice-Chancellor of The University 
OF THE South. 

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS 

The proceeds from the scholarship funds listed are awarded by the Vice- 
Chancellor to students nominated by the Faculty Committee on Admissions and 
Scholarships. Awards are made for a period of one year, though they may be 
renewed from year to year if the recipients are doing satisfactory work, and may 
be cancelled at the end of any semester during which the student's academic record 
does not meet the minimum requirements for scholarship holders. 

These scholarships are awarded to students of adequate ability and demonstrated 
financial need. Awards may be made to entering students or to students already en- 
rolled In the College. 

The University of the South is one of forty-four Southern colleges which subscribe 
to the following statement concerning financial aid: 

SCHOLARSHIP AGREEMENT 

1. Financial aid consists of scholarships or grants, loans, and employment. The 
financial aid programs in most of these colleges are composed of various combinations 
of these types of aid. 

2. The principal responsibility for financing a college education lies with the family. 
A student who needs financial assistance should be expected to work for and to 
borrow a reasonable part of the aid needed to meet expenses. 

3. In selecting a financial aid recipient, special consideration should be given to 
the applicant's promise and achievement. 

4. The amount of financial aid given a student should be determined on the basis 
of his financial need. 

5. It is desirable for colleges to consult one another in establishing the size of a 
stipend for a common applicant In order that the candidate may clioose his college 
rather than his sppend. 



136 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

6. Each applicant for financial aid at one or more of these institutions must submit 
detailed financial Information to the College Scholarship Service for transmittal to 
the institutions concerned. 

7. The amount of stipend depends on the applicant's financial status. It therefore 
represents confidential information which should not be made public by the college, 
the school or the candidate, whether or not the allocation of financial aid is publicly 
announced. 

8. An applicant for financial aid who is applying to more than one of the mstitutions 
will not be required to give any of these institutions notice of his acceptance before 
May I. 

The Baker-Bransford Memorial Scholarship 

The mcome from $37,500, the gift of Mrs. Lizzie Baker Bransford of Augusta, 
Georgia, to be awarded annually by the Vice-Chancellor to worthy and poor boys to 
enable them to secure an education in the University. 

The Grace Mahl Baker Loan Fund 

A fund of $10,000 initiated in 1958 by members of the class of 1927, under the 
leadership of Ralph Speers, Jr, as a tribute to Mrs. George M. Baker, who, durmg the 
thirty-one years her husband was Dean of the College, won the affection and admiration 
of countless students for her gracious entertaining, her unfailing concern, and her 
Christian example. The fund is to enable students, in case of financial emergency, to 
remain in the University. Loans are to be repaid when the recipient becomes gain- 
fully employed, with mterest accruing from the date of employment. 

The William O. Baldwin Scholarship 

The income from $10,600, established in 1958 by Captain William O. Baldwin of 
Montgomery, Alabama, an alumnus of this University, to be used to help the offspring 
of naval personnel. 

The Phllo Sherman Bennett Scholarship 

A fund of $500 presented by the Hon. William Jennings Bryan, Trustee, the In- 
come to be applied in aid of poor and deserving boys in obtaining an education. 

The Annie WIngfield Claybrooke Scholarship 

The income from $8,000, established 1926, by Misses Elvma, Eliza, and Virginia 
Gaybrooke, of Nashville, Tennessee, in memory of their sister, Annie Wingfield Clay- 
brooke. To assist in the education of a worthy Southern boy of American birth, 
preferably a postulant or candidate for Holy Orders, the beneficiary to be desig- 
nated by the Vice-Chancellor of the University. 

The Columbus, Ga., Scholarship 

The Income from a fund of $S,ooo, the gift of Mrs. George Foster Peabody, of 
New York. Originally this was a graduate scholarship, but in 1936, by letter to the 
Vice-Chancellor, Mr. Peabody transferred it from a graduate scholarship to an under- 
graduate scholarship In the College. The beneficiary to be named by the Vice- 
Chancellor. 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE COLLEGE 137 

The Myra Adelia Craigmiles Cross Scholarship 

The income from $76,300.37, the bequest of Mrs. Myra Adelia Craigmiles Cross, to 
assist in the education of needy and worthy students to be selected by the proper 
officers of the University. Established 193 1. 

The Byrd Douglas Scholarship 

The mcome from approximately $S,8oo, bequeathed to the University by Miss 
Mary Miller to aid in the education of deservmg Tennessee boys, the beneficiaries to 
be appointed by the Vice-Chancellor. 

The Bishop Dudley Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the gift of Mrs. Herman Aldrich of New York City, in 
memory of the Rt. Rev. Thomas Underwood Dudley, D.D., LLX)., D.C.L., Bishop of 
Kentucky and Chancellor of this University. The beneficiaries are appointed by the 
faculty. 

The Rosalie Quitman Duncan Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $3,000 bequeathed to the University by Misses Eva C. and Alice 
Quitman Lovell, of Natchez, Miss., to be used in the payment of the expenses of 
some student at The University of the South, and to be awarded under rules and 
regulations promulgated by said University. 

The Benjamin H. Frayser Scholarship 

A fund of $2,000, established 1939 by Mrs. Anne R. F. Frayser in memory of her 
son, Dr. Benjamin H. Frayser, a former student in the Medical School of this Uni- 
versity. The income from this fund to assist in defraying the expenses of some 
deserving student appointed by the Vice-Chancellor. The recipient of the scholarship 
shall agree to read a monograph on Major Frayser's life as a part of the require- 
ments to be fulfilled in receiving this award. 

The William A. and Harriet Goodwyn Endowment 

The income from $10,420.73, the gift of the late Judge William A. Goodwyn, of 
Memphis, Tenn. and his wife, Harriet Goodwyn, for the purpose of educatmg one or 
more worthy students who could not otherwise defray their college expenses. 

The Charlotte Patten Guerry Scholarship 

The income from $10,000, given by Z. Cartter Patten and his mother, Mrs. Sarah 
Key Patten, of Chattanooga, Tennessee, for one or more deserving students who plan 
to study Forestry in the College. The scholarship is named after Mrs. Alexander 
Guerry, wife of Sewanee's late Vice-Chancellor, who did much to expand the Forestry 
Department in the College. 

The James Edward Harton Scholarship 
The mcome from $5,000, established 1959, by Mrs. Anne Harton Vinton of Los 
Angeles, California, in memory of her brother, James Edward Harton, an alumnus of 
this University. 



138 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The James Hill Scholarships 

The James Hill Scholarships are provided by the income from a bequest of $39,000^ 
made by Mr. James Hill, of Mississippi, for educating promising young men of 
marked ability who are in need of financial assistance to defray their college expenses. 

The Telfair Hodgson Scholarship 

The Income from $5,344, the gift of Mrs. Medora C. Hodgson of Sewanee, Tennessee, 
m memory of her husband, Telfair Hodgson, a devoted alumnus and for many years 
Treasurer of the University. Tliis fund, established in 1961, is to assist worthy and 
needy students. 

The Atlee Heber Hoff Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $3,000, established 1956, by Mrs. Atlee H. Hoff of Decatur, Alabama, 
as a living memorial to her husband, Atlee Heber Hoff, an alumnus of this Unlverslty,. 
whose career was spent in the field of banking, finance, and Investment. The income 
of this fund Is to be applied to the senior year University expenses of a worthy 
student of scholastic attamment who Is preparing for a career in banking, finance, and 
investment and who has completed three years in the Department of Economics and 
Business at The University of the South. The beneficiary is to be designated by the 
Vice-Chancellor and the Head of the Department of Economics and Business. Should 
the University establish a Graduate School of Economics and Business, this scholarship 
shall be available at either the graduate or undergraduate levels according to the 
decision of the same authorities. The availability of this scholarship shall be an- 
nounced to those majoring In the above subject at the beginning of each term. 

The Atlee Henkel Hoff Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $3,000, established 1945, by Mr. and Mrs. Atlee H. Hoff of Decatur,. 
Alabama, as a living memorial to their son, Lieutenant Atlee Henkel Hoff, USNR, aa 
alumnus of this University, who died In the service of his country In World War H. 
The income from this fund Is to be applied to the senior year University expenses 
of a worthy student In Economics and Business Administration of academic attain- 
ment who has completed three years In this subject at The University of the South. 
The beneficiary to be designated by the Vice-Chancellor and the Head of the De- 
partment of Economics and Business. The availability of this scholarship shall be 
announced to those majoring In the above subjects at the beginning of each term. 

The Louis George Hoff Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $3,000, established 1947, by Mr. and Mrs. Atlee H. Hoff, of Decatur, 
Alabama, as a living memorial to their son, Louis George Hoff, an alumnus of this 
University, who lost his life in the Texas City, Texas, disaster of April 16, 1947. 
The income from this fund is to be applied to the senior year University expenses of 
a worthy student in Chemistry of academic attainment who has completed three 
years in this subject at the University of the South. The beneficiary to be desig- 
nated by the Vice-Chancellor and the Head of the Department of Chemistry. The 
availability of this scholarship shall be announced to those majoring In the above- 
subject at the beginning of each term. 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE COLLEGE 1 39 

The Marshall Hotchkiss Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $25,000, established by the will of Mrs. Venie Shirte Hotchkiss 
as a memorial to her husband, Marshall Hotchkiss. The beneficiaries are appointed 
by a committee of five which is headed by the Vice-Chancellor. 

The Huguenot Society of America Scholarship 

An annual grant of $1,000 for as many as four years from the Huguenot Society of 
America. The recipient of this scholarship must be able to furnish proof of his 
Huguenot ancestry, but he need not be a member of the Society. 

The Jesse H. Jones Scholarships 

A five-year scholarship grant totalling $12,500, made in 1957 by the Trustees of 
Houston Endowment, Inc. These scholarships, not to exceed $750 to any recipient, 
are awarded on the basis of academic promise, leadership potential, and economic 
need. Annual reports, including a progress report on all students receiving aid, are 
to be made to the Trustees of Houston Endowment, Inc. 

The Charles James Juhan Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $20,000, the gift from Mrs. Alfred I. duPont, as a memorial to Lieutenant 
Qiarles James Juhan, son of the Rt. Rev. Frank A. Juhan, D.D. The income to 
be used as a scholarship through the years for a friend or friends of Charles or their 
descendants. 

The George Shall Rausler Scholarship 

The income from $7,448.75, established m 1938 by Mrs. George S. Kausler, of 
New Orleans, La., in memory of her husband. To assist in the education of a needy 
boy. When possible, a New Orleans or Louisiana youth to be favored. The recipient 
to know in whose name the scholarship functions. 

The Frank Hugh Kean Scholarship 

A fund of $1,575, established in 1959 by Frank Hugh Kean, Jr., and his sister, Mrs. 
Edward Duer Reeves, in memory of their father, Frank Hugh Kean, of Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana. The income from the fund is to help needy students in the College. 

The James S. Kemper Scholarships 

The James S. Kemper Foundation of Chicago has selected The University of the 
SoxTTH to award James S. Kemper Scholarships. These are four-year scholarships 
valued at $3,800 each, to be apportioned at the rate of $950 per year for each of the 
student's four years in Sewanee. One of these scholarships will be awarded each year 
to an entering freshman who possesses clearly superior qualifications and who plans 
definitely to make a career in some branch of Insurance administration. As a part 
of his educational program, each Kemper Scholar will work In an Insurance office 
during his summer vacations; after graduation he will be assisted by the Kemper 
Foundation In finding employment with a mutual insurance company or Inspection 
bureau. A Scholar's acceptance of the benefits of the award, both at the time of his 
appointment and at the beginning of each year of his college career, will be evidence 
of his sincere intention to adhere to the program; it is in no way bindmg. 



140 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The Minna Retchum Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $1,000, to be used as a scholarship for mountain boys. Es- 
tablished in 193 1 by the Convocation of Scranton of the Diocese of Bethlehem. 

The Overton Lea, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the bequest of the late Overton Lea, of Nashvuie, as a 
memorial to his son, Overton Lea, Jr., an alumnus of this University. 

The James Coates Lear Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $10,000, established in 1963 by friends of James Coates Lear, an alumnus 
of this University who resided in Washington, D. C, at the time of his death. 

The Louise Black MacDougald Scholarship 

A fund of $8,000, bequeathed to the University under the will of Louise Black 
MacDougald of Atlanta, Georgia, the income from which Is to aid worthy students 
who need it and are m training or bemg educated for the Episcopal ministry. 

The Charles Pollard Marks Memorial Scholarship 

An annual award by Charles Caldwell Marks to perpetuate and promote the ideals 
of his father. The recipient shall be the Junior Gownsman selected by the faculty 
as the outstanding man in personal honor and Integrity, moral character, leadership, 
friendliness of democratic attitude and good scholarship. 

The William Leak Marshall, Jr., Scholarship 

The income from $6,000, established by the will of Mrs. MIrta M. Marshall as a 
memorial to her nephew. To be awarded by the Vice-Chancellor to some needy and 
worthy student, with preference being given residents of the Diocese of North Caro- 
lina. The recipient may be a student in the College If he has satisfied the Vice- 
Chancellor that he intends to study for the ministry. 

The Morris and Charles Moorman Scholarship 

The income from $9,100, established In 1954, by Mrs. Charles H. Moorman of 
Louisville, Kentucky, as a memorial to her sons, Morris and Charles. The beneficiary 
of this scholarship is to be appointed by the Vice-Chancellor. 

The Mary Rawlinson Myers Scholarship 

The income from $1,000, a bequest by Mrs. Mary Rawlinson Myers, of Charlotte, 
North Carolina, to be used in assisting young men studying or preparing for the 
ministry. 

The Lewis C. Nelson Scholarship 

The income from a fund of $S,ooo, established 1932, to be used in paying the tuition 
and if necessary the support of young men when in actual attendance as students in 
preparation for the ministry, or for assisting a young man In his preliminary education 
upon written statement of his intention to prepare himself for the mmistry. 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE COLLEGE I4I 

The Northern Students' Scholarship 

The income from a fund of $3,331.66 origmated by the Sigma Phi Fraternity to 
assist worthy students from the North. Beneficiaries to be appointed by the Vice- 
Chancellor from residents of Northern states. 

The Thomas O'Connor Scholarship 

The income from $10,000, established 1924, bequeathed to the University by Mrs. 
Fannie Renshaw O'Connor in memory of her husband; to be awarded on the basis 
of academic attaiimient, the beneficiary to be nominated annually by the faculty to 
the Vice-Chancellor. 

The Burr James Ramage Scholarship 

Under the will of Mrs. Harriet Page Ramage there was bequeathed the sum of 
$8,687.81 for the purpose of establishing a scholarship in the academic Course for such 
students and under such conditions, limitations, rules and regulations as the faculty of 
the University may from time to time adopt. The said scholarship shall be known as 
the Burr James Ramage Scholarship as a permanent memorial to her late husband. 

The John G. and Fannie F. Ruge Scholarships 

Three scholarships of $500 each to be awarded annually for twenty years, begin- 
nmg in 1947, established by Mr. John G. Ruge and his wife, Mrs. Fannie F. Ruge, of 
Apalachlcola, Florida. To be awarded to students from Florida who are members of 
the Episcopal church and who have achieved the highest rating in scholarship and 
general activities in the Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior classes of the College during 
the preceding year, the winners of said awards to be determined by the Faculty of the 
College. 

The Ernst Rust, Jr., Scholarship 

A fund of $2,545, the gift of Antoinette and Ernst Rust, of Columbus, Georgia, 
for a scholarship as a living memorial to their son, a former student of this Univer- 
sity. The income Is to be used for the benefit of an upperclassman in this University. 

The William G. and Marie Selby Scholarships 

An annual award of $4,800 from the William G. and Marie Selby Foundation to 
provide scholarship-loan grants to talented young men, primarily in the various fields 
of science, who because of financial need would be deprived of an advanced education. 
Some preference will be given brilliant and deserving Sarasota and Florida students. 
Each Selby Scholar will normally be required to repay one half his annual grant, 
without interest, over a forty-month period, starting one year after graduation. 

The Bettye Hunt Selden Scholarship 

The income from $6,393.64, established In 1952 by Selden Henry in memory of his 
grandmother. The recipient of this scholarship is to be appointed by the Vice- 
Chancellor. 

The Cecil Sims, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

The Cecil Sims, Jr., Scholarship is a scholarship fund established by Mr. and Mrs. 



142 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Cecil Sims of Nashville, Tennessee, in memory of their son, Cecil Sims, Jr., a formei 
student of The University of the South, who was killed in action in France m World 
War II. These funds are to aid worthy students to pay their way through the Uni- 
versity to such an extent and in such a manner as may be determined by the Vice- 
Chancellor . 

The Adair Sklpwith Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $3,000, bequeathed to the University by Miss Kate A. Skip with of Ox- 
ford, Mississippi, the income to be used for scholarships awarded in memory of Adair 
Skipwith, who was one of the nine students present at the opening of the University. 

The Algernon Sydney Sullivan Scholarships 

An annual donation for ten scholarships, established in 1937 by the Algernon 
Sydney Sullivan Foundation and for the Sullivan Medallion Awards, made by the 
New York Southern Society. The requirement to qualify for these scholarships is 
that the student, after reading the biography of Algernon Sydney Sullivan, write an 
essay on moral ideals. 

The John Potter Torian Student Loan Fund 

A fund of $1,900, established in 1940 by friends to honor the memory of a be- 
loved Sewanee alumnus, John Potter Torian. This fund to be a loan fund to help 
worthy students needing assistance. 

The Vernon Southall Tupper Scholarship 

A fund of $15,000, established in 1945 by the friends of Mr. Vernon S. Tupper of 
Nashville, Tennessee, an alumnus of this University, in recognition of his many con- 
tributions to civic, religious, educational, and welfare activities, the income from 
which is to be awarded as scholarships by the Vice-Chancellor to young men of 
character and intellectual promise. 

The Leila E. Werlein Scholarship 

A fund of $2,000, bequeathed to the University under the will of Leila E. Werlein, 
of Houston, Texas, for helping poor boys who wish to study for the ministry. 

The Georgia M. Wilkins Scholarship 

A fund of $953,078.37 established by Miss Georgia M. Wilkins of Columbus, 
Georgia. The income from this fund is to provide aid for needy, worthy, and qualified 
Students. The recipient must demonstrate high character, a sense of responsibility, 
leadership, and academic competence. The recipients of these awards will be designated 
as Wilkins Scholars. The Director of Admissions upon request will send a descriptive 
brochure giving full information. 

The Laurence Moore Williams Scholarship 

The income from $20,000, established 1934 by the wife, son, and daughter of 
Laurence Moore Williams, a devoted alumnus of the University; to be used for fur- 
thering the Interests of the University, preference being given to Its use as a partial 
scholarship for one or more worthy, needy students; the beneficiaries to be nominated 
by the Vice-Chancellor. 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE COLLEGE I43 



Other Scholarship Funds 

In addition to the proceeds from the scholarship funds listed above, scholarships 
are awarded from the principal of cash gifts designated for scholarship purposes. The 
amounts and the sources of these gifts vary from year to year. Such scholarships are 
awarded in the same manner as other scholarships. 

In some instances cash gifts are received to be used as scholarships for specified 
individuals; the students concerned must be approved by the Faculty Committee on 
Admissions and Scholarships to receive scholarship aid. 

Eligibility for Scholarship Aid 

A student entering the College as a freshman may apply for any of the scholar- 
ships offered; his eligibility to receive a scholarship is determined by the Committee 
on Admissions and Scholarships after examination of his credentials. 

To retain a scholarship, any student must meet all of the requirements established 
by the College Faculty. In general, any scholarship holder must maintain an academic 
average of C or better each semester. Should his average fall belotw B in any 
semester, his scholarship may be classified as a service scholarship during the following 
semester, and he may be called upon to do a small amount of work for the University. 

Scholarship Applications 

Each entering freshman or transfer student applying for a scholarship, regardless of 
kind, must do the following: 

1. Submit a complete application for admission to the College. 

2. Have submitted by his parents or guardian a Confidential Financial Statement 
to the College Scholarship Service. 

3. Take the College Entrance Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude Test not 
later than February of the year m which he is applying (the January test is pre- 
ferred.) 

The forms for making application for admission and for a scholarship may be 
obtained from the Director of Admissions. It is expected that most scholarship funds 
will be awarded to those applying before March i, though some funds may remain 
for late applicants. Students receiving financial aid must re-apply each spring by 
submitting new financial statements; the necessary forms may be obtained from the 
Director of Admissions. 

Work Opportunities 

Approximately fifty part-time jobs are available on the campus. Most of these 
jobs require eight hours of work a week and pay $120 a year the first year and 
$150 a year thereafter. Application for these jobs should be made to the Director of 
Admissions. 

In addition to the jobs above, students wait on tables in the dining hall. Be- 
cause of the added responsibility and time required in these jobs, stipends for satis- 
factory work are between $400 and $500 a year. 

Since Sewanee is a very small town, there are few opportunities for work outside 
the University. 



144 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOXTTH 

Student Loan Funds 

The University has established, from various sources, a Student Loan Fund. Loans- 
from this fund may be made to needy and worthy students who have been approved 
to receive such loans. 



SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 

Certain scholarships are available to help meet the expenses of stu- 
dents in the School of Theology. Except in the case of diocesan 
funds, for which nominations are made directly by the Bishop, appli- 
cations for aid should be made to the Dean, accompanied by a full 
statement of the financial situation of the applicant. 

The Abram Martin Baldwin and Elizabeth Ewin Baldwin Scholarship 

The income from a fund of $16,042.17, established in 1952 by their children in 
memory of their parents, to be used to aid theological students from the state of Ala- 
bama, preference being given to members of the Church of the Ascension, Montgomery. 

The Percy Brown, Sr., Scholarship 

The income from $2,000 given by Mr. and Mrs. George Garvm Brown, Louisville^ 
Kentucky, in memory of Mrs. Brown's father, Percy Brown, Sr., to be used as scholar- 
ship aid for students in the School of Theology. 

The Barlow-Brown Scholarship 

The income from $355664.79, a bequest from the estate of Dr. Alice Barlow-Brown 
of Corpus Christi, Texas, to be used for loans and grants to worthy students studymg 
for the ministry. Preference is given to students from the State of Arkansas who shall 
be designated by the Bishop of Arkansas. Upon agreement of the Vice-Chancellor 
and the Dean of the Theological School, the mcome may be assigned to students from 
other dioceses. 

Hie Bishop Burton Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $6,590, a fund established by the Diocese of Lexington in 1935, 
to be used to aid theological students, preference being given students from the 
Diocese of Lexmgton. 

The Agnes Z. Carpenter Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $51,200, for students from the Diocese of Mississippi, preference 
being given to students from Trinity Parish, Natchez. Established 1934. 

Bishop Carruthers Memorial Scholarship 

This scholarship was established m 1961 with an initial gift of $2,000 from the 
Episcopal Churchwomen of the Fourth Province In memory of Bishop Carruthers for 
the benefit of students in the School of Theolog)^ 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY I45 

The Edmund D. Cooper Scholarship 

The income from $S,ooo, for a student nominated by the rector of the Qiurch of 
the Redeemer, Astoria, Long Island, New York, or by the Chancellor or Vice- 
Chancellor of The University of the South. 

Bishop Dandridge Memorial Scholarship 

The income from gifts, amounting at present to $2,140.05, provided by many people 
as a memorial to Bishop Dandridge, for the benefit of students in the School of 
Theology. 

The Honorable and Mrs. D. W. DeHaven Memorial Scholarship 

The trust fund established in 1961 by the will of Mrs. Anna H. DeHaven of 
Memphis, Tennessee, in memory of Judge and Mrs. DeHaven, is primarily for the 
benefit of worthy students from the Diocese of Tennessee upon the recommendation 
of the Dean of the School of Theology. 

The William McClure Drane Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $8,000, the gift of Miss Myrtle Drane of Clarksville, Tennessee, 
in memory of her father, William McClure Drane, for aid to needy and deservmg stu- 
dents in the School of Theology of The University of the South, to be nominated by 
the Dean or the Vice-Chancellor. 

The Jessie Ball duPont — Frank A. Juhan Theological Scholarship 

The mcome from $185,303, to aid worthy and needy postulants or candidates for 
Holy Orders nominated by Bishop Frank A. Juhan, or whomever Bishop Juhan may 
designate, in such numbers as the mcome may permit and in such amounts as worthy 
applicants may need. In the event of no nommations from Bishop Juhan, the Dean 
of the School of Theology shall nominate worthy candidates. All nominations are to 
be made at least thirty days prior to the beginning of the school session. 

The scholarships are outright gifts; but the donor hopes that the recipients, when 
they have an earning capacity, will pass on the same amount that they have received 
to some other student to assist m financing the education of that worthy student. 

The Grosvenor Scholarship 

The mcome from $20,000, the gift of Miss Ursula Grosvenor of Southern Pines, 
North Carolina, for aid to students In the School of Theology, nommated by the Vice- 
Chancellor or the Dean. 

The Gabriel Alexander Guignard Scholarship Fund 

The income from $25,000 established by the will of Miss Carolme Guignard of 
Columbia, South Carolina, in memory of her brother, Gabriel Alexander Guignard, to 
help with scholarships for needy students of the School of Theology. The Fund is to 
be administered by Dean Alexander or his successors and /or the Rev. Dr. C. Fltz- 
Simons Allison. Established 1959. 



10 



146 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The Hail Memorial Scholarship 

This fund of $15,108.56 was established In 1944 by Mr. J. Conway Hail, Mrs. Y. M. 
(Betty Hail) Massey, and Mr. J. Conway Hail, Jr., of Batesvllle, Arkansas. The 
income from this fund is to be used for scholarship aid to students in the School of 
Theology, the beneficiary or beneficiaries to be named by the Bishop of Arkansas; 
or, should he fail to do so by August i, then by the VIce-Chancellor, for the ensuing 
academic year. 

The Alice M. Hall Scholarship 

The income from $7,470.37 for University charges of a student. This fund was 
raised by faculty, students, and alumni of the School of Theology m memory of 
Alice Mary Hall, Matron, after her death on May 31, 191 3. 

The Henry C. Hall Scholarships 

The income from $10,000, the bequest of Miss Alice M. Hall in memory of her 
brother, for two students who are "candidates for Holy Orders, pursuing the full 
course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Divinity in the School of Theology, the 
beneficiaries to be Bachelors of Arts from some college or university approved by 
The University or the South." 

The Dr. and Mrs. Charles W. Hock Scholarship 

The income from this scholarship, established in 1962 by gifts from Dr. and Mrs. 
Charles W. Hock of Augusta, Georgia, is for the benefit of students enrolled in the 
School of Theology, first preference being given to students from the Church of the 
Good Shepherd, Augusta, Georgia, or the Diocese of Georgia. It is to be awarded at 
a time agreed upon by the school and the donor. 

The Sarah Foard Hume Scholarship 

The income from $5,062.57, the bequest of Mrs. Sarah Foard Hume Lewis of 
Lexmgton, Tennessee, for aid to students in the School of Theology. 

The John Jay Ide Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the gift of Mrs. Dora Donner Ide of New York city, in 
memory of her husband John Jay Ide, for a student in the School of Theology, nomi- 
nated by the Dean of the School of Theology or the VIce-Chancellor. 

The Kinnett Scholarship 

Scholarship awards in the amount of $16,500 given by Mr. Frank M. Kinnett, At- 
lanta, Georgia, to students In the School of Theology upon the recommendation of the 
Dean of the School of Theology or the VIce-Chancellor. 

The Theodore Hamilton Kirk Scholarship 

The income from a fund, established In 1961 by a gift of $3,000 from Mrs. Julian 
C. Headley of Tallahassee, Florida, in memory of Theodore H. Kirk, is for the benefit 
of students enrolled in the School of Theology. 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY I47 

The James Douglas Kirkpatrick and 
James Douglas Kirkpatrick, Jr. Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $10,000, established In 195 1 by Katharme W. Kirkpatrick of Birming- 
ham, Alabama, In memory of her husband and son. 

Income from this fund Is available for scholarship aid to regular students in the 
School of Theology who are postulants or candidates for Holy Orders m the Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church. Beneficiaries are to be selected by the Dean of the 
School of Theology on the basis of academic merit and financial need, special con- 
sideration bemg given to any descendants of the donor who may be in the School 
of Theology. 

In any year that the income is not required for scholarships it may be used for 
current operating expenses of the School of Theology. 

The Louise Black MacDougald Scholarship 

A fund of $8,000, bequeathed to the University under the will of Louise Black Mac- 
Dougald of Atlanta, Georgia, the Income from which is to aid worthy students who 
need it and are in training or being educated for the Episcopal mmlstry. 

The G. C. McCaughan Scholarship 

Income from this fund, established by George C. McCaughan in the name of his 
father, G. C. McCaughan, is to be used to aid theological students from the state 
of Florida. 

The William Leak Marshall, Jr., Scholarship 

The income from $6,000, established by the will of Mrs. MIrta M. Marshall as a 
memorial to her nephew. To be awarded by the VIce-Chancellor to some needy and 
worthy student, with preference being given residents of the Diocese of North Carolina. 
The recipient may be a student in the College if he has satisfied the VIce-Chancellor 
that he Intends to study for the ministry. 

The Maury Scholarship 

The income from $7,967.57, the gift of Mrs. Joseph E. Maury of Memphis, Tennessee, 
to be used to assist students in the School of Theology. 

The Lewis C. Nelson Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, for a student In the School of Theology or for a 
student in the College nominated by the VIce-Chancellor after submission of a 
written statement of mtentlon to study for the ministry. Established 1932. 

The Richard Peters Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the bequest of Mrs. Mary J. Peters, for a student 
nommated by the VIce-Chancellor. 

The Annie Owsley Railey Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $42,604.12, established by the will of Jennie Farris Railey King 



148 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

{Mrs. Douglass W. King), in memory of Annie Owsley Railey. This scholarship to 
be used to assist students in the School of Theology from the state of Kentucky or 
from San Antonio, Texas, or from the Diocese of West Texas. The awards shall rotate 
should there be qualified students from the three regions. 

The John G. and Fannie P. Ruge Scholarships 

Two scholarships of $500 each to be awarded annually for twenty years, beginning 
in 1947, established by Mr. John G. Ruge and his wife, Mrs. Fannie F. Ruge, of 
Apalachicola, Florida. To be awarded by the University to needy theological stu- 
dents of exemplary moral character on their application therefor and on the recom- 
mendation of the Protestant Episcopal Bishop of Florida and the Dean of the 
School of Theology. 

The St. Stephen's Scholarship 

An annual grant of $400 from St. Stephen's Parish, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for 
aid to theological students nommated by the Dean of the School of Theology. 

The C. GriflSth Sharkey Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $1,388.05, established in 1963 by the gift of $1,000.00 given to the 
glory of God and in loving memory of C. Griffith Sharkey by his family and friends, 
is for the benefit of students in the School of Theology. Each year a student will be 
nominated by the parents, the Rev. and Mrs. William L. Sharkey. In the event they 
have no nommation, the decision will rest with the Dean of the School of Theology. 

The Martin R. Tilson Scholarship 

Funded by securities of a face value of $500 in debenture bonds carrymg a 6 percent 
interest rate with an indicated return of $30.00 per annum, payable semiannually; the 
fund bemg managed by the donor corporation, which desires that its name be withheld. 

The Annie Overton Treadwell Scholarship 

The income from $10,000, a bequest of Miss Annie Overton Treadwell, to be used 
for scholarships for needy and deserving students in the School of Theology. 

The Leila E. Werlein Scholarship 

A fund of $2,000, bequeathed to the University under the will of Leila E. Werlein 
of Houston, Texas, for helping poor boys who wish to study for the mmistry. 



Diocesan Scholarships 

The Alston Memorial Scholarship 

The intome from $67,758.85, the bequest of Mrs. Caro duBignon Alston of Atlanta, 
Georgia, to provide one or more scholarships, the recipients of which are to be chosen 
by the Bishop of the Diocese of Atlanta and the Rector of St. Luke's Episcopal 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY I49 

Church, Atlanta, Georgia. The beneficiaries of the scholarships shall be students 
studying for the ministry either in the College of Arts and Sciences or in the School 
of Theology of The University of the South. 

The Barnwell Scholarship 
The income from $6,045, the bequest of Mrs. Isabelle C. Barnwell, for a student 
nominated by the Bishop of Tennessee. 

The Reverend Robert South Barrett Scholarship 

The income from $5, 000, the gift of Dr. Robert S. Barrett of Alexandria, Virginia, 
in memory of his father, the Reverend Robert South Barrett, D.D., for a student 
Dominated by the Bishop of Virginia. 

The Dr. William Egleston Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, established by the will of Dr. William Egleston of 
Hartsville, South Carolina. The beneficiary shall be nominated by the Bishop of 
South Carolina; but if the Bishop of South Carolina does not nominate any one, the 
nomination may be made by the Bishop of Upper South Carolina or, in default 
thereof, by the Vice-Chancellor. 

The Robert Andrew Hargrove Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $3,000, the gift of Mrs. Louise B. Hargrove, for a student 
nominated by the Bishop of Mississippi. 

The Laura Hoadley Humphrey Scholarship 

The income from $6,100, the bequest of Mrs. Laura Hoadley Humphrey of La 
Grange, Georgia, for a postulant or postulants from the Diocese of Atlanta and 
nominated by the Bishop of Atlanta. The beneficiaries are "morally bound to serve 
said Diocese" after their ordmation for the time equivalent to that during which 
they were beneficiaries. 

The Bishop Juhan Scholarship 

The mcome from $5,667.90, established in 1950 by the Diocese of Florida, to be 
paid annually to a student or students in the School of Theology from the Diocese 
of Florida who shall be nominated by the Bishop of the Diocese of Florida. 

The Kentucky Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the gift of Mrs. T. U. Dudley in memory of Bishop 
Dudley, formerly Chancellor of the University, for a student nominated by the 
Bishop of Kentucky. 

The Leonidas Ledbetter Little Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the gift of Mrs. L. L. Little of Ansonville, North Caro- 
lina, in memory of her husband, for a student nominated by the Bishop of North 
Carolina. Established 192 1. 



150 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The Augustus Hammond Robinson Scholarship 
The income from $10,000, the gift of Mrs. Delia B. Robinson of Nashville, Tennes- 
see, in memory of her husband, for a student nominated by the Bishop Coadjutor 
of Tennesssee. Established 1933. 

The St. Andrew's Scholarship 
The income from $10,000, the bequest of Mrs. C. M. Manlgault, for two students, 
one nominated by the Bishop of South Carolina, the other by the Bishop of Upper 
South Carolina. 

The St. Thomas' Scholarship 

A fund established in 1963 m the amount of $1,875.00 by St. Thomas' Church, 
Columbus, Georgia, for the benefit of the students of the School of Theology upon the 
nomination of the Bishop of Atlanta. 

The Waldburg Scholarship 
The income from $15,100, the bequest of Mrs. E. L. W. Clinch, for students nomv 
nated by the Bishop of Georgia. 

The Fred G. Yerkes, Jr., Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the gift of Mr. and Mrs. Fred G. Yerkes, Senior, in de- 
votion to their son, the Reverend Fred G. Yerkes, Jr., to be used in the payment of 
the expenses of a postulant or candidate for Holy Orders from the Diocese of Florida, 
preparing for the sacred ministry at The University of the South, and to be awarded 
by the Bishop of the Diocese of Florida or by the Vice-Chancellor of The University 
or THE Soxtth. 

The Fred G. Yerkes, Sr., Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the gift of the Reverend Fred G. Yerkes m memory 
of his father, Fred G. Yerkes, Sr.; to be used in the payment of the expenses of 
a postulant or candidate for Holy Orders, preferably from the Diocese of Florida, 
preparing for the sacred ministry at The University of the South, and to be awarded 
by the Bishop of the Diocese of Florida or by the Vice-Chancellor of The UNrvERsmr 

OF THE SotTTH. 



OTHER SOURCES OF AID 

The Care Zimmerman Cleveland Scholarship 

The income from $3,000, the gift of the Misses Zimmerman of Eutaw Springs, 
South Carolina. Administered by St. Luke's Brotherhood for the increase of the 
ministry. Established 1904. 

DuBose Scholarship 

Income from endowment funds established by the assets of the DuBose Memorial 
Church Training School of Monteagle, Tennessee, to assist postulants who are thirty- 
two years of age or older to attend Episcopal semmaries. 



J 



OTHER SOURCES OF AID I5I 

The Evangelical Education Society 

This organization of the Protestant Episcopal Church awards financial grants to 
theological students. Application for financial assistance must be made to the society 
by February 15 in order to be considered for the followmg academic year. 

Knights Templar Educational Foundation of Georgia 
Awards have been granted from time to time to seminarians from Georgia as an 
expression of the interest and high regard of Masons for young men who devote their 
hves to the service of God and humanity. These awards are made only on the nomi- 
nation of the Dean upon request from the Foundation. 

Society for the Increase of the Ministry 

Grants-in-aid have been awarded by the Society to needy students certified by their 
Bishop and the Dean of the School of Theology. 

The St. Luke's Brotherhood for the Increase of the Ministry 

Organized in November, 1892, by alunmi and students of the School of Theology. 
Its object is to increase and to improve the supply of candidates for Holy Orders, 
and in case of need to assist and encourage any who are pursuing studies toward 
ttat end in the University. 

The Teagle Foundation, Incorporated 

A grant of $10,000, to The University of the South for theological scholarships for 
students, for the academic year 1964-65. This grant has been received for the past 
several years and has been of aid to many grateful students. 



EMPLOYMENT 

A very limited amount of employment is available for credit against 
University charges. Students needing such help should present their 
cases to the Dean. There are very few opportunities for earning money 
outside the University. 



MEDALS AND PRIZES 

The following medals and prizes are awarded annually, subject to 
the conditions noted under the respective subjects: 



College of Arts and Sciences 

1. The Ruggles-Wright Medal 

(For French), founded by Mrs. Ruggles-Wright, of New Jersey. 



152 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

2. The Isaac Marion Dwight Medal 

(For Philosophical and Biblical Greek), founded by H. N. Spencer, MJD., of St. 
Louis, Mo., awarded annually, and open to all students of the University. 

3. The E. G. Richmond Prize 

(For Social Science), founded by the late E. G. Richmond, of Chattanooga, Tenn., 
consists of books, to the value of twenty-five dollars. Awarded annually to that stu- 
dent with the best record for two years* work in political, sociological, and economic 
studies. 

4. The South Carolina Medal 

(For Latm), founded by Walter Guerry Green, of Charleston, S. C. 

5. The Guerry Award 

(For English), founded by the late Vice-Chancellor Alexander Guerry, of Se- 
wanee, Tenn. 

6. The Algernon Sydney Sullivan Medallion 

(For character), established by The New York Southern Society, New York City. 

7. The Susan Beatty Memorial Prize 

(For Chemistry), awarded annually to the student who makes the greatest improve- 
ment in General Chemistry. 

8. The Allen Farmer Award 

(For Forestry); awarded to a senior who has shown deep interest in the ideals 
and purposes of the University. 



The School of Theology 

1. The George Thomas Shettle Prize 

Founded by the Rev. George Thomas Shettle of Hunsingore House, Weatherby, 
England. A prize of ^25.00 offered annually to a Senior for the best reading of one 
of the Prayer Book Services selected by the Faculty. 

2. The Isaac Marion Dwight Medal 

Founded by H. N. Spencer, M.D., of St. Louis, Mo., awarded annually for ex- 
cellence in Greek and open to all students of the University. 



MEDALS AND AWARDS 153 

AIR FORCE ROTC MEDALS AND AWARDS 

The following medals and awards are presented annually to Air Force 
ROTC cadets for outstanding achievement while enrolled in the 
AFROTC program: 

1. The Professor of Air Science Medal 

(For outstandmg contribution of service), founded by Lt. Col. W. Flinn Gilland, 
USAF, first PAS at the University. 

2. The General L. Kemper Williams Medal 

(For the most outstanding senior cadet), founded by Gen. L. Kemper Williams, 
New Orleans, La., former chairman of the Board of Regents. 

3. The Air Force Association Award 

(For the most outstandmg jimior cadet), founded by the Air Force Association. 

4. The Kirby-Smith Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy Medal 

(For the most outstanding sophomore cadet), founded by the Kirby-Smith Chapter, 
U. D. C, Sewanee, Tennessee. 

5. The Bonholzer-Campbell Post, American Legion, Medal 

(For the most outstanding freshman cadet), founded by the Bonholzer-Campbell 
Post, American Legion, Sewanee, Tennessee. 

6. The Guerry Scholarship Award 

(For the highest academic record), founded by Col. Alex Guerry, Jr., USAFR, Chat- 
tanooga, Tennessee. 

7. The Chicago Tribune Gold and Silver Medals 

(For outstanding achievement and character, three medals, one to a cadet in the 
junior, sophomore, and freshman classes), founded by The Chicago Tribune, Chicago, 

HL 



REGISTER 



156 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS 
SUMMER INSTITUTE 1963 

Ahn, Don, B.S., (Univ. of North Dakota) Balaton, Minn. 

Amendolara, Victor Joseph, B.S., (City College of New York) Garfield, N. J. 

Bannerman, Herbert Alex, B.A., (Univ. of Washington, Seattle) Hopewell, Fa. 

Bauman, Jon Jay, B.S., (Hamllne University) Wheaton, Minn. 

Blackwell, Frederick Raymond, B.S., (Mississippi College) Mobile, Ala. 

Chambers, Clyde Frank, Jr., B.S., (Western Michigan University) . . Boca Raton, Fla. 

Chambers, Walter Blevlns, Jr., B.A., (Maryvllle College) St. Andrew's, Tenn. 

Croneberger, Charles Leslie, Jr., B.S., (Millersville State College) Pine Grove, Pa. 

Dreer, Vernon Hiram, B.A., (Syracuse University) Horseheads, N. Y. 

Drisklll, William David, B.S., (Murray State College) Murray, Ky. 

Ensmlnger, Andrew Jackson, IV, B.S., (University of Tennessee) . . Rockledge, Fla. 

Ervin, Clinton Lamar, B.S., (University of Tennessee) Sewanee, Tenn. 

Fasick, Miss Helen Ann, A.B., (Woman's College, Univ. of N. C.) . . Monroe, N. C. 

Haislip, Joseph Alton, Jr., A.B., (East Carolina College) Pocomoke, Md. 

Hannah, Howard Malcolm, M.A., (Middle Tenn. State College) .... Sewanee, Tenn. 
Harris, Edward Bledsoe, Jr., B.A., (The University of the South) . . Lynchburg, Fa. 

Hillln, Jean Austin, B.S,, (Stephen F. Austin State College) Houston, Tex. 

Hodson, Robert Dale, B.A., (University of Florida) Fenice, Fla. 

Inscho, Mrs. Barbara Pickel, B.S., (Tennessee Wesleyan Coll.) . .Kendall Park, N. /. 

Inscho, Frank Paul, A.B., (LaFayette College) Kendall Park, N. J. 

Johnston, Ronald Travis, B.S., (Southwest Texas State College) .. San Benito, Tex. 

Joslln, Paul Harold, B.S., (Cornell University) Elba, N. Y. 

Kelley, The Rev. Paul Bernard, B.S., (Crelghton University), S.T.B. .. Elkhorn, Neb. 

Kelly, Charles Harvey, A.B., (Villa Madonna College) Florence, Ky. 

Lackey, Mrs. Frances E. Powell, A.B., (Univ. of Chattanooga) . . Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Lane, Mrs. Janis S., B.A., (Florence State Teachers College) Huntsville, Ala. 

Lee, Peter Leonard, B.S., (Mankato State College) Clay Center, Neb. 

Lipscomb, Robert Ray, B.S., (Florence State College) Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

MacKelth, Frank Maitland, A.B., (LaFayette College) Houston, Tex. 

Maddox, William Lucas, B.S., (University of Kentucky) Florence, Ky. 

Magee, Mrs. Virginia Lucy, B.S., (Boston University) Manchester, Conn. 

Martin, James Sinclair, B.A., (Vanderbllt University) South Salem, N. Y. 

Martin, John Locke, B.S., (Appalachian State Teachers College) Cocoa, Fla. 

Murolo, Mrs. Elizabeth Podgwaite, B.S., (Central Conn. State Coll.) 

Wolcott, Conn. 

♦Myers, Frederick Howe, Jr., B.S., (University of Georgia) Augusta, Ga. 

Petit, Ralph Eugene, B.S., (University of South Carolina) Miami, Fla. 

Pickard, Thomas Francis, B.A., (The University of the South) . . Nashville, Tenn. 

Reeves, Richard Allen, B.S., (Rose Polytechnic Institute) Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Rosenman, Richard Lee, B.A., (University of Michigan) West Babylon, N. Y. 

Shirk, George Bernard, B.A., (Augustana College) Geneseo, III. 

Sigler, Emory Alvin, Jr., B.S., (North Texas State College) Piano, Tex. 

Speegle, Kenneth Lyle, B.S., (Middle Tennessee State College) . . St. Andrew's, Tenn. 

Stephens, Larry Keith, B.A., (Middle Tennessee State College) Hemet, Calif. 

Storey, Galen Van Dorn, Jr., B.A., (Jacksonville, Ala. State 

Teachers College) South Pittsburg, Tenn. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 157 

Xrepanler, Miss Sybil Eileen, B.S., (Michigan State Univ.) . . . Iron Mountain, Mich. 

Whaley, Henry W., B.S., (Erskine College) Lancaster, S. C 

Yellm, Mrs. Mildred Bromberg, A.B., (Montclair State College) . . Springfield, N. J 



SUMMER SCHOOL 1963 

Anderton, Miss Betty Randall Cowan. Tenn, 

(University of Mississippi) 

Austin, Miss Susan Ellen Miami, Fla. 

(Stetson University) 

Baker, Miss Sherry Kaye Jackson, Miss. 

Boyd, Joseph Anthony, Jr Winchester, Tenn, 

(Tulane University) 

Britt, Thomas Edward Alexandria, Fa. 

Brittain, Joseph Alexander, Jr Roanoke, Ala. 

Brock, William Edward Cowan, Tenn. 

(Memphis State University) 

Brush, Charles Beeler Nashville, Tenn. 

Bryan, Jatob Franklin, IV Jacksonville, Fla. 

Burns, Guy Louis, Jr Birmingham, Ala, 

(University of Southern Mississippi) 

Campbell, Michael Armour Sewanee, Tenn. 

Campbell, Wilburn Welles Charlotte, N. C. 

Carroll, Lucius Wyman, II Norwich, Conn. 

(Vanderbilt University) 

Chamberlain, Thomas Landress Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

Chandler, Ralph Joseph Nashville, Tenn. 

Clark, Ross Carlton Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

Costello, William, III West Islip, N. Y. 

Culp, Douglass Birmingham, Ala, 

(Re-entering from Tulane University) 

Davidson, Miss Diane Decherd, Tenn. 

(Gulf Park College) 

Earls, Arthur Cleveland, III Nashville, Tenn. 

Elliott, William Henry Meridian, Miss. 

Ewell, Arnold Edwin, II Huntsville, Ala. 

(St. Bernard College) 

Fox, Carl, III Jackson, Miss, 

(Marion Institute) 

Giannini, Robert Edward Winter Park, Fla. 

Gibson, Walter Bruce Stamford, Conn 

Gilbert, Lon Bascomb, III Chattanooga, Tenn 

Goodman, Charles Edward, Jr Decherd, Tenn 

Gornto, George Deanes Wilmington, N. C. 

Gugelmann, Richard John Laugenthal, Switzerland 

Hall, Thomas Bryan, III Kansas City, Mo. 

Hamilton, Taber, III Hamden, Conn. 

Harwell, Jess Aldred, III Fort Worth, Tex. 

Herring, Robert Freeman, III Newnan, Ga. 

Hight, Gordon Lee, II Rome, Ga. 

Hutto, James Isaac Birmingham, Ala. 

(Howard College) 



158 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 
Johnson, Miss Christina Betts Berkeley, Calif. 

(University of California) 

Joslyn, Harry Pennington, III Wilmington, Del. 

(University of North Carolina) 

Kelly, William Palmer Crestview, Fla. 

Kori, Charles William Jacksonville, Fla. 

(Re-entering from University of Florida) 

Lee, William Bradford San Antonio, Tex. 

LeRoux, Grant Meade, Jr Sea Island, Ga. 

Lokey, Charles William, III Birmingham, Ala. 

Lott, James Craft New Orleans, La. 

Love, Robert Calhoun Huntsville, Ala. 

(University of Alabama Center, Huntsville, Ala.) 

McGown, Daniel Thomas, Jr Memphis, Tenn, 

(Auburn University) 

Mann, David Royall Mobile, Ala. 

Mims, William Jemison Warrington, Fla. 

Morrison, Langdon Gates Cincinnati, Ohio 

Peterson, Erit Lang St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Porch, Ralph Douglas, III Anniston, Ala. 

Polk, Miss Helen Elizabeth Helena, Ark. 

Powers, Ernest Michael Estill Springs, Tenn. 

(Georgia Institute of Technology) 

Puckett, Mrs. Winston Moore Winchester, Tenn, 

(Middle Tennessee State College) 

Rountree, Jack Wayne Del Rio, Tex. 

Salter, Paul Broward, Jr Jeswp, Ga. 

Smith, Clarence McFerrin, Jr DeLand, Fla. 

Stacpoole, Peter Wallace Mill Valley, Calif. 

Stockell, Albert Wright, III Nashville, Tenn. 

Stump, Rev. Derald William St. Andrew's, Tenn. 

(Episcopal Theological Seminary-Cambridge) 

Templeton, Harvey Maxwell, III Winchester, Tenn. 

Tompkins, Joel Urquhart Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Uden, James LeSueur Nashville, Tenn. 

Vaughan, William Orren, Jr Nashville, Tenn. 

Webb, Stephen Elliott Sewanee, Tenn. 

Wood, Robert Hancock, Jr Sewanee, Tenn. 

(Centre College) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Classification at beginning of the first semester 1963-64 

SENIORS 

(Minimum requirements: 92 sem. hrs. and 86 qual. credits) 

Agnew, Martin Luther, Jr. (History) Meridian, Miss. 

Aldrich, Bruce Winslow (French) Longmeadow, Mass. 

Alexander, Raydon Eiland (Classical Languages) San Antonio, Tex. 

Babbit, Harry Livingston, Jr. (Political Science) Port St. Joe, Fla. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 159 

Beasley, Thomas Lawrence (Forestry) Franklin, Tenn. 

Bennett, Robert Kimbrel (Classical Languages) Charleston, S. C. 

(Re-entering from College of Charleston) 

Black, Robert Ray (English) , Birmingham, Ala. 

♦Bocock, George Bradford (Mathematics) Ridgetop, Tenn. 

(Re-entering from Vanderbilt University S.S.) 

Bondurant, John Reid (Political Science) Memphis, Tenn. 

Bostick, Allan Mclver, Jr. (Biology) Quincy, Fla. 

Brooks, Harry Willard, Jr. (English) High Point, N. C. 

Brown, James Samuel, Jr. (English) Leland, Miss. 

Bulcao, Douglas William (Political Science) Slidell, La. 

Burroughs, Franklin Gorham, Jr. (English) Conway, S. C. 

Byrne, Patrick Lowell (Philosophy) New York, N. Y. 

Byrnes, William Harwood (English) Rome, Italy 

Calhoun, George Reid, IV (Mathematics) Seaford, Del. 

Carlberg, Dale Levan, Jr. (Political Science) Jeffersonville, Ind. 

Chamberlain, Thomas Landress (English) Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

Cobbs, Nicholas Hamner, Jr. (History) Greensboro, Ala. 

Cofer, James Franklin (Biology) Soddy, Tenn. 

Cooper, Richard Randolph (Political Science) Winter Park, Fla. 

(Re-entering from United States Air Force Academy) 

Cowart, Walter Luvenda (Economics) Pierson, Fla. 

Culp, Douglass (Political Science) Birmingham, Ala. 

(Re-entering from Tulane University) 

Culpepper, Warren Leigh (Economics) (Mathematics) Atlanta, Ga. 

Curtis, Michael Kent (Political Science) Galveston, Tex. 

Daniell, William Franklin (English) Port St. Joe, Fla. 

Dargan, Samuel Godfrey (Economics) Conway, S. C. 

Davis, Robert Phelps (Biology) Golf, III. 

Davis, William Cole, Jr. (Economics) Opelika, Ala. 

DeVore, David G., HI (Philosophy) Cincinnati, Ohio 

Dillard, Robert Guerard (Biology) Memphis, Tenn. 

Donnelly, Charles Pinckney, HI (Political Science) Corpus Christi, Tex. 

Dotson, Guy Roosevelt (Economics) Winchester, Tenn. 

Dozier, Henry Cuttino, HI (Political Science) Ocala, Fla. 

Dunbar, Pres'cott Nelson (History) (Political Science) Baton Rouge, La. 

Duncan, Daniel Dunscomb, HI (Political Science) Russellville, Ky. 

Duncan, John Davis (English) Nevada, Mo. 

Dye, David Goddard (English) Atlanta, Ga. 

Ellig, Robert Frank (Political Science) Tucson, Ariz. 

Farrar, Charles Thomas (Philosophy) New York, N. Y. 

Ferguson, Hill, HI (Political Science) Decatur, Ala. 

FitzSimons, James Middleton, Jr. (English) Atlanta, Ga. 

Flachmann, Michael Charles (English) St. Louis, Mo. 

Floyd, Thomas William (English) Andalusia, Ala. 

Foster, Bernard Augustus, HI (Economics) Chevy Chase, Md. 

Frontier, John Philip (Political Science) Avondale Estates, Ga. 

Gardner, Robert Wayne, Jr. (Economics) Nashville, Tenn. 

Giannini, Robert Edward (English) Winter Park, Fla. 

Gibson, Walter Bruce (Chemistry) Stamford, Conn. 



i60 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

GrIfRs, Donald Warner (History) San Jngelo, Tex.. 

Groos, Edward Lanham ( Spanish) San Ant onto ^ Tex. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Hagler, John Brown, Jr. (Political Science) Lenoir City, Tenn. 

Hall, Thomas Bryan, HI (History) Kansas City, Mo.. 

Hamilton, Taber, HI (Political Science) Hamden, Conn. 

Hansberger, Frank Oliver, HI (English) Atlanta, Ga. 

Heard, William Wright (Economics) Tulsa, Okla. 

Henry, George Kenneth Grant (English) Asheville, N. C. 

Hooker, Kingsley Wilde, Jr. (English) Memphis, Tenn. 

Hoole, William Brunson, Jr. (English) Florence, S. C. 

Hunt, Lacy Harris, H (Economics) Houston, Tex. 

(Re-entering from Stephen F. Austin State College) 

Ingle, John Pierce, HI (Political Science) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Ingram, John Harland, Jr. (Philosophy) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Jackson, Harold Stephen (History) New Albany, Miss. 

Janeway, John Livingston (English) Warrington, Fla.. 

Jones, Grier Patterson (Political Science) Fort Worth, Tex. 

Kirby-Smith, William Woolverton (Biology) Sewanee, Tenn. 

Kirchen, Christopher Paul (English) Memphis, Tenn. 

Kizer, Jerry Dudley, Jr. (Political Science) Brownsville, Tenn. 

Rolling, James Andrew, Jr. (Political Science) Mary Esther, Fla. 

Kring, Robert Stephen (Economics) Ormond Beach, Fla. 

Lattimore, Bertram Gresh, Jr. (History) East Aurora, N. Y. 

McDaniel, James Stuart (Biology) Atlanta, Ga. 

McDonald, John Arthur (Philosophy) Newellton, La. 

McDowell, John Dinkins, Jr. (English) Blytheville, Ark. 

Mclver, Evander Roderick, III (Forestry) Conway, S. C. 

McLellan, Edward Alden, Jr. (Forestry) New Orleans, La. 

Mabry, Jerry Larry (Political Science) Jacksonville, Fla. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Mason, Richard Lowell (Mathematics) Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Mason, Thomas Dilworth Stewart (English) Atlanta, Ga. 

Matte, Paul Joseph, III (English) Phoenix, Ariz. 

Miller, Alfred, III (English) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Mims, William Jemison (Classical Languages) Pensacola, Fla. 

Moisio, Michael Hall (Forestry) Kirkwood, Mo. 

Moore, Laurance Kimball (Mathematics) Seattle, Wash. 

Mounger, Samuel Gwin, Jr. (English) Greenwood, Miss. 

Murray, Daniel Buntin (Economics) Nashville, Tenn. 

Neder, Ellis Emeen, Jr. (English) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Nowlin, Forrest Dickerson, Jr. (History) Minneapolis, Minn. 

Ogier, Dwight Eugene, Jr. (Philosophy) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Owens, Joseph Andrew, II (Political Science) Beaumont, Tex. 

Parker, Knowles Richard (Economics) Atlanta, Ga. 

Parker, Peter Pierson, Jr. (Economics) New York, N. Y. 

(Re-entering) 

Pelzer, Felix Chisolm (Political Science) Charleston, S. C. 

Pemberton, James Michael (English) Nashville, Tenn. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS l6l 

Powell, George Matthews, IV (English) South Charleston, W. Fa. 

Price, James Sterling (Biology) Knoxville, Tenn. 

Rice, Robert Williams (Philosophy) Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Rietzel, Willard Paul (Economics) Wethers field, Conn. 

Roeder, William Franklin, Jr. (Political Science) Falls Church, Va. 

Royster, Jack Allensworth, Jr. (Mathematics) Nashville, Tenn. 

Rue, William Hansell, Jr. (Economics) Andalusia, Ala. 

Sadler, Wilson McPhail (Political Science) Davidson, N. C. 

Salvage, John Waltz (Mathematics) (Physics) Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

Sanders, Robert Jordan (Mathematics) Merriam, Kans. 

Schmutzer, Alfred Charles, Jr. (Political Science) Sevierville, Tenn. 

Smith, Winston Gage (History) Bethesda, Md. 

Snider, Harvy Lamed (Biology) Russellville, Ky. 

Speights, David Lee (English) Nashville, Tenn. 

Stanton, Victor Paul (English) Mobile, Ala. 

Stephenson, John Richard (Mathematics) Dalton, Ga. 

Stirling, William Lundeen (Political Science) Columbia, S. C. 

Stuart, William Alexander Cocke (Political Science) Memphis, Tenn. 

Swann, Julius Seth, Jr. (History) Gadsden, Ala. 

Sylvan, Johannes Bengston, HI (English) Dallas, Tex. 

Taylor, Edwin Hunter (Economics) Johnson City, Tenn. 

Thomas, Robert Walton, Jr. (German) Ridgeway, S. C. 

Thomason, Michael Vincent (History) West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Timberlake, Donald Henry Crenshaw (History) Ellerson, Va, 

(Re-entering from University of Richmond) 

Tisdale, Charles Pressley Roberts (English) Orangeburg, S. C. 

Todd, John Alan, Jr. ( Spanish) Harrison, Ark. 

Tompkins, Joel Urquhart (English) Pittsburg, Pa. 

Trabue, Thomas Malone, Jr. ( Spanish) Nashville, Tenn. 

Trimble, Joseph Finch (Political Science) Monroe, La. 

Walker, Stephen Edward (History) Freer, Tex. 

Wallace, Allen Meadors (English) Nashville, Tenn. 

Weaver, William Cheatham, HI (History) Nashville, Tenn. 

Webb, Morton Monroe, Jr. (Economics) Shelby ville, Ky. 

Wenning, Arthur Bandy ( Spanish) Nashville, Tenn. 

Weston, Robert Vernon (English) Charleston, S. C. 

Wheeler, William Bradford (Forestry) Wadesboro, N. C. 

White, Stephen Pettus, HI (English) Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Whiteside, David Edward (Philosophy) New Orleans, La. 

Whitmg, Wythe Lawler, HI (Philosophy) Mobile, Ala. 

Wilson, Charles Ryall, Jr. (Physics) Coleman, Tex. 

Wiltsee, David Herbert (Political Science) Atlanta, Ga. 

Wimer, James Kenneth (Mathematics) El Dorado, Ark. 

Winkelman, Joseph William ( English) Keokuk, Iowa 

Wood, James Burnette (Mathematics) Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Yerger, Norval Rice ( English) Greenville, Miss. 

Young, John King (French) Atlanta, Ga. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

•Entered Second Semester. 

11 



l62 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

JUNIORS 

(Minimum requirements: 60 sem. hrs. and 54 qual. credits) 

Adams, Jerry Bass GlendaJe, Mo. 

Adams, Jim Dozier, Jr Sfartanburg, S. C. 

Allen, Franklin Pearson, III Memphis, Tenn. 

Baffaro, Peter Morley Kent, Wash. 

Bailey, Louis Michael Dothan, Ala. 

Bailey, Percival Roberts, III Gainesvilh, Ga. 

Baker, Robert Ellis Tulsa, Okla. 

(Re-entering from University of Tulsa) 

Baldwin, William Irwin, Jr Cincinnati, Ohio 

Barber, Stephen Hugh Birmingham, Ala. 

Bass, Francis Marion, Jr Nashville, Tenn. 

Bertrand, William Turner Pulaski, Tenn. 

•Boatwright, Purvis James, Jr Columbia, S. C. 

(Re-entering from University of South Carolina) 

Braugh, James Richard Beaumont, Tex. 

Brooks, Harry Willard, Jr High Point, N. C. 

Bryan, Jacob Franklin, IV Jacksonville, Fla. 

Bullock, Michael Thomas Independence, Kans. 

Burns, Harry Anderson, III Birmingham, Ala. 

Garrison, Henry George, III Rembert, S. C. 

Cass, Robert Howard Macon, Ga. 

Chesley, Thomas Evan Mount Dora, Fla. 

Clark, Ellis Banks Crossett, Ark. 

Clarkson, Allen Boykin, Jr Augusta, Ga. 

Cockrill, Jack Jennings Little Rock, Ark. 

Colmore, Josephus Conn Guild Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

Coursey, James Browning Elkton, Ky. 

Covington, William DeBerry Lakeland, Fla. 

Darst, David High Pinehurst, N. C. 

Daves, Reginald Forrest Summerville, S. C. 

Deshon, (jeorge Ellis, Jr Monte Sereno, Calif. 

Dickson, James Gary Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Dicus, Michael Finley San Antonio, Tex. 

Diegmann, Frank George Hamilton, Ohio 

Diegmann, Fred Ferris Hamilton, Ohio 

Dobbin, Richard Bynum Spruce Pine, N. C. 

Dormeyer, Kirkwood Robert Williamsville, N. Y. 

(Re-entering) 

Dyas, Michael David Seabrook, Tex. 

Eamon, Thomas Floyd Durham, N. C. 

Edwards, Bingham David Decatur, Ala. 

Ehlert, William Rowe Selma, Ala. 

Folbre, James DuBose, Jr San Antonio, Tex. 

Freeman, Judson, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. 

Fretwell, John Bagster Coral Gables, Fla. 

Furtwangler, William Alexander Cunnington Charleston, S. C. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1 63 

Gardmer, Patrick Roberts Kenilworth, 111. 

Gignilliat, William Robert, III Gainesville, Ga. 

Gosnell, Ernest William, Jr Berryville, fa. 

Griffith, Aubrey Daniel Richmond Heights, Mo. 

Gronbeck, David Grand Ridge, Fla. 

Gulteras, George Patrick Gainesville, Fla. 

Guyton, John Joseph, Jr Santurce, Puerto Rico 

*Hamge, Allen Frederick Houston, Tex. 

(Re-entering from University of Tennessee) 

Hall, Preston Lucien Sarasota, Fla. 

Hamilton, William Alvm, HI Jacksonville, Fla. 

Hann, William Graham Westport, Conn. 

Hannum, Ellwood Brown New Hartford, N. Y. 

Harrison, James Harrell, Jr Pensacola, Fla. 

Hart, Richard Morey, Jr Pensacola, Fla. 

Hilsman, Joseph Hamilton, HI Atlanta, Ga. 

Holt, David Faulcon Signal Mountain, Tenn. 

Home, James Arthur Coleman, Tex. 

Howell, Robert Johnson Nashville, Tenn. 

Hughes, Timothy William Ramsey, N. J. 

Ide, Richard Ritner Darien, Conn. 

Israel, Richard Edson Hutchinson, Kans. 

James, Wyatt Edgar Frederic Libertyville, HI. 

Johnson, Joseph Thomas Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Johnson, Randall Stuart Polos Verdes Estates, Calif. 

Jones, Albigence Waldo, Jr Finings, Ga. 

•Jordan, Ingersoll New Orleans, La. 

(Tulane University) 

Kellermann, Joseph Lodge, Jr Charlotte, N. C. 

Kendig, James Jerome Fairborn, Ohio 

Koger, James Alfred Roswell, Ga. 

Kuhnell, Charles Robert New Orleans, La. 

Lamb, Vincent Shaw, Jr Huntsville, Ala. 

Lee, Robert Emerson Fort Walton Beach, Fla. 

Lee, William Bradford San Antonio, Tex. 

Lefeber, Robert Randolph Galveston, Tex. 

Little, Herbert Lindsay Spartanburg, S. C. 

Lumpkin, Alexander Henderson Rock Hill, S. C. 

Lumpkin, Arthur Hirst Rock Hill, S. C. 

(Re-entering) 

McCaughan, Mark Roland Pensacola, Fla. 

McCrory, Charles Freeman, III Jacksonville, Fla. 

McGinnis, Harrill Coleman Nashville, Tenn. 

Mahoney, William James, III Montgomery, Ala. 

Majors, Frank Larry Sewanee, Tenn. 

Mann, William Stillwell, Jr Mobile, Ala. 

Martin, Michael David Lakeland, Fla. 

Maull, Frederick Howard Philadelphia, Pa. 

Milne, Douglas John Jacksonville, Fla. 



164 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Mitchell, William Frank, II Jacksonville^ Fla. 

Morrison, Donald Craig, Jr Cincinnati, Ohio 

Moye, Robert James, Jr Swainsboro, Ga. 

(Georgia Military College) 

Muse, Marshall Groves, III Longview, Tex. 

Myers, Douglass Edwards, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. 

Newberry, Alpha Omega, III Sao Paulo, Brazil 

Newcum, John Paul Jasper, Ind. 

(Re-entering) 

Nicholas, Joel Edward Nashville, Tenn. 

Noel, Hayes Acklen, Jr Nashville, Tenn. 

(Re-entering) 

Norman, Eldon Layne Pensacola, Fla. 

(Pensacola Junior College) 

Parker, Joseph Fleming Greenville, S. C. 

(Davidson College) 

Patton, Mitchell Albert Nevin, III Rome, Ga. 

Phillips, Peter Rhind Houston, Tex. 

Pierce, James Madison Cleveland, Tenn. 

(Re-entering from University of Chattanooga) 

Plyler, Joseph Philip Tampa, Fla. 

Poe, Terry Clean Albuquerque, N. M. 

(Re-entering from University of New Mexico) 

Porter, William Kumpe White Plains, N. Y. 

(Re-entering) 

Poster, Gerbrand, III Myrtle Beach, S. C. 

Powell, Richard Hays Bartlesville, Okla. 

Price, Morgan Exum Albuquerque, N. M. 

(Re-entering) 

♦Pueschel, Charles Lynwood Lake City, Fla. 

(Re-entering from Lake City Junior College) 

Ransom, Charles Gray, Jr Nashville, Tenn. 

Ravenel, James Morris Winnsboro, S. C. 

Reld, John Harland, Jr Decatur, Ga. 

Rice, Robert Williams Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Richards, John Mason Fredericksburg, Fa. 

Ross, Charles Danforth Clarksville, Tenn. 

Rowland, Walter Thomas, III Washington, D. C. 

Russell, Howard Ewing, Jr Greenville, S. C. 

Sanders, Jack Palmer Merriam, Kans. 

Sava, Dennis Michael Amityville, N. Y. 

Scott, Conley Jay, II Wichita, Kans. 

Scott, James Warren Terre Haute, Ind. 

Seiters, John Douglas Signal Mountain, Tenn. 

Semmer, John Richard Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Speer, Michael Sheppard Indianola, Miss. 

Splane, Peyton Edwards, III Jesup, Ga. 

Stanford, Robert Ernest Montgomery, Ala. 

Stewart, James Robert Pensacola, Fla. 

Stickney, Frederick Grist, V Mobile, Ala. 

Stone, Alvord Lovell, Jr Tampa, Fla. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1 65 

Stone, Tillman Price, Jr Birmingham, Ala, 

Stratford, Alfred Louis Richmond, Fa. 

Stubblefield, Frank Weiland Franklin, Tenn. 

Sullivan, Claude Townsend, Jr Greenville, S. C. 

Taylor, Richard Scott Atlanta, Ga. 

Templeton, Harvey Maxwell, III Winchester, Tenn. 

Thames, James Franklin Ponte Fedra, Fla. 

Thornton, Daniel Ingram Montevallo, Ala. 

Thrower, William Hicks, Jr Cherazv, S. C. 

Tucker, Herbert Ray Bethel Springs, Tenn. 

Tully, James Hunt Lakeland, Fla. 

Turner, Robert Harris Miami, Fla. 

Vander Horst, John, Jr Memphis, Tenn. 

Varnell, James Lawrence Sewanee, Tenn. 

Waddell, Michael Geoffrey Del Rio, Tex. 

Wade, William St. Clair Greenville, N. C. 

♦Wallace, Robert Ellis Allardt, Tenn. 

(Re-entering from University of Tennessee) 

Watson, William Doyle Jesup, Ga. 

Weaver, Dudley Saunders Memphis, Tenn. 

Webb, Paul Hamilton Waring Sewanee, Tenn. 

Webb, Stephen Elliott Sewanee, Tenn. 

Wehman, Ernest Arnold, Jr Charleston, S. C. 

Wherry, David Kenneth Claremont, Calif. 

Williams, Louis Christopher Nashville, Tenn. 

Wittliff, Herman Albert, III Lufkin, Tex. 

Wolff, Bernard Wellborn Atlanta, Ga. 

Wood, Wilbur Leon, Jr Alachua, Fla. 

Wright, Derril Henry Lead, S. Dak. 

Wright, Jim Tarwater Louisville, Ky. 

Wright, Wilbur Thurston, Jr Westminster, Md. 

Wyatt, Wilson Watkins, Jr Louisville, Ky. 

Yeary, James Knox Elberton, Ga. 

♦Entered Second Semester. 



SOPHOMORES 

(Minimum requirements: 24 sem. hrs. and 18 qual. credits) 

Abemathy, James Harry, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. 

Allen, Charles Roblson, Jr Gastonia, N. C. 

Alves, Joseph Hodge, III Falls Church, Fa. 

Anderton, John Carwell Jackson, Miss. 

Atkinson, Steven Thomas Springfield, Mo. 

Baird, James Patchings, ^ III_ New York, N. Y. 

(Re-entering from University of Tennessee) 

Ball, Edmund Rhett Nashville, Tenn. 

Ballard, Westervelt Terhune New Orleans, La. 



1 66 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Best, Peter Farquhard Brevard, N. C. 

Black, Edward Barnwell Greenville, S. C. 

Boone, David Andrew Meggett, S. C. 

Borden, Robert Remington, III West'port Harbor, Mass. 

Bragg, Joseph Jeffrey Vicksburg, Miss. 

Broadfoot, Thomas Winston Cha-pel Hill, N. C. 

Brock, William Edward (deceased) Cowan, Tenn. 

(Memphis State University) 

Brooks, David Kendrick, Jr Jackson, Miss. 

Brown, Donald Sterling, II Jacksonville, Fla. 

*Bruda, James Norman Jacksonville, Fla. 

(University of Georgia) 

Buchanan, David Thomas Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Buffington, Noel David Huntsville, Ala. 

Burke, James Otey, Jr Richmond, Fa. 

(Louisburg College) 

Callaway, James Gaines, III Kansas City, Mo. 

Campbell, Michael Armour Sewanee, Tenn. 

Campbell, Thomas Rex, Jr White Bear Lake, Minn. 

Canada, John Bradley, Jr Aylett, Fa. 

Canon, Robert Maurice Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Capers, John Gendron, III Bryn Mazvr, Pa. 

Carey, John Austin Memphis, Tenn. 

Chalaron, Pierre Rivalier Covington, La. 

Coleman, Bruce Mclsaac Uniontown, Ala. 

Coleman, Heyward Hamilton Charleston, S. C. 

Coleman, Robert Lee, Jr ^ Uniontown, Ala. 

(Re-entering from Auburn University) 

Condra, Philip Andes Whitwell, Tenn. 

Conner, James Claude, II Pompano Beach, Fla. 

Cooper, Donald Bryant Mullins, S. C. 

Cooper, Guy Laurence, Jr Selma, Ala. 

Costello, William, III West Islip, N. Y. 

(Re-entering) 

Crow, Raymond Lee Miami, Okla. 

Darlington, Alan Bloomington, III. 

Davidson, Brooke Allentown, Pa. 

Davis, Daniel Muncaster Marion, Ohio 

Dawson, John Holman Sumter, S. C. 

Drayton, Joseph William, Jr Ridgewood, N. J. 

Duncan, Kyle Edward Neptune Beach, Fla. 

Elliott, William Henry Meridian, Miss. 

Engle, David Stuart San Antonio, Tex. 

•Ewell, Arnold Edwin, II Huntsville, Ala. 

(St. Bernard College) 

Pagan, William Michael, Jr Tullahoma, Tenn. 

Fears, Jesse William Alexander Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Feaster, Norman Brunner, II Jensen Beach, Fla. 

Fisher, Michael Wayne West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Fitch, William Babcock Columbia, S. C. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 167 

Flowers, James Herbert, Jr College Park, Ga. 

Flynn, Richard Michael Castro Valley, Calif. 

Fogg, David Michael Savanna, III, 

(Re-entering from University of Houston) 

•Freeman, Pickens Noble, Jr Winston-Salem, N. C. 

(Re-entering from Wake Forest College) 

Gaston, Ian Frederick Chickasaw, Ma. 

Gates, William Day, II Mobile, Ala. 

Gignilliat, Edward Harris Gainesville, Ga. 

Gilbart, Kenneth Deen St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Gipson, James Elywin Sewanee, Tenn. 

Gordon, Jack Elliott, Jr Claremore, Okla. 

Graham, Jerry Robert Selmer, Tenn. 

Green, Frank Armstrong Jacksonville, Fla. 

(Tusculum College) 

Greenland, Robert Tupper Alexandria, Va. 

Gruman, James Andrew, Jr Independence, Mo. 

Gugelmann, Richard John Laugenthal, Switzerland 

Gwinn, James William, Jr Darien, Conn. 

Haines, Stacy Allen, III Glencoe, 111. 

(Went worth Military Academy) 

Harrison, Burr Powell, III Leesburg, Va. 

Harrison, John Townsend, Jr Birmingham, Ala. 

Harrison, Joseph Morgan Charleston, S. C. 

Harry, Robert Porter, Jr Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Hartley, Wayne Chandler Fort Leavenworth, Kans. 

Hay, John Williams Frankfort, Ky. 

Helfenstein, William Luther Caribou, Maine 

Henson, Gregory Hawkins (deceased) Cowan, Tenn. 

Hickey, Donald Robert La Grange, III. 

(Univrsity of Illinois) 

HIght, Gordon Lee, II Rome, Ga. 

Hood, Robert Holmes Charleston, S. C. 

Hughes, Evan Griffith Columbus, Ohio 

James, Charles Fleetwood, III Tallahassee, Fla. 

Jegart, Michael Rudolf Tallahassee, Fla. 

Jockusch, David Julius San Antonio, Tex. 

Johnson, William Alfred Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Johnson, William Taber Yorkville, III. 

Jones, Franklin Clifford, III Houston, Tex. 

Jones, Robert Michael Beaufort, S. C. 

Jones, William Bruce Springfield, Tenn. 

Joslyn, Harry Pennmgton, III Wilmington, Del. 

(University of North Carolina) 

Kelley, Dwight Mason Savannah, Ga. 

(Re-entering from Armstrong College of Savannah) 

Kelly, William Palmer Tallahassee, Fla. 

Kennedy, James Allen, Jr Nashville, Tenn. 

Kinkead, Shelby Cameal, Jr Lexington, Ky. 

Kori, Charles William . ; Jacksonville, Fla. 

(Re-entering from University of Florida) 

Ladd, Sam Gaillard Mobile, Ala. 



1 68 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Lamble, John Maverick Miami, Fla. 

Lampley, Michael Ford Burns, Tenn. 

Larkin, James Ronald Huntland, Tenn. 

♦Laskey, John Jochim Daytona Beach, Fla. 

(Florida State Uniyersity) 

Lee, Scott Jackson Atlanta, Ga. 

(Re-€nteri»g) 

LeRoux, Grant Meade, Jr Sea Island, Ga. 

Lincoln, Michael Bartholomew Ware, Mass. 

♦Lott, James Craft Nezv Orleans, La. 

(Hinds Junior College) 

Limd, John Moss, Jr Swansea, Mass. 

*McBride, Robert Cowham San Francisco, Calif. 

(University of Maryland— Munich, Germany) 

McClellan, Roby Blount, Jr Tallahassee, Fla. 

McDanlel, George William Atlanta, Ga. 

McDowell, Gilmore Simms, III Charleston, S. C. 

(Re-entering from The Citadel) 

McFaddin, Eugene Harmon Blount Beaumont, Tex. 

McGown, Daniel Thomas, Jr Memphis, Tenn. 

(Auburn University) 

McKee, Randolph Lowe Staten Island, N. Y. 

A^cMahon, Marshall Emet Fort Worth, Tex. 

McMIIlin, Fitten Lamar Little Rock, Ark. 

Malone, Roy Leighton, III Fresno, Calif. 

(Re-entering from Fresno State College) 

Martin, Kenneth Lee Dallas, Tex. 

Mason, Samuel Alison Huntsville, Ala. 

Mays, Robert Leland, Jr Decatur, Ala. 

Milling, David Pipes New Orleans, La. 

Mills, Jeffrey Alan Alexandria, Fa. 

Mims, James Walthall, Jr Pensacola, Fla. 

Mislove, Michael William Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

Moody, Charles Alan Libertyville, III. 

Moore, William Kenneth Atlantic Beach, Fla. 

Moore, William Ross Crenshaw Newbern, Tenn. 

Munselle, William George San Angela, Tex. 

Murphey, Daniel Hoke St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Nadeau, Robert Lee Jacksonville, Fla. 

Napier, Michael Leverett Macon, Ga. 

Nichols, Edward Curtis, Jr Jackson, Miss. 

O'Connor, Frank Lynwood, Jr Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

(University of Chattanooga) 

Ohl, Charles Wallis, Jr Chickasha, Okla. 

Palomares, Ricardo, Jr Miami, Fla. 

Parmelee, Robert Alexander Austin, Tex. 

Parr, William Dean, Jr Collierville, Tenn. 

Paschall, Douglas Duane McKenzie, Tenn. 

Paterson, Allen Hackett Metairie, La. 

Patterson, Jerome Augustine, III Jacksonville, Fla. 

Peake, John Day, Jr Mobile, Ala. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1 69 

Peterson, Eric Lang St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Peterson, Peter Olof, Jr Little Rock, Ark. 

Pierce, Joseph North Cleveland, Tenn. 

(University of Chattanooga) 

Powers, Ernest Michael Estill Springs, Tenn. 

(Georgia Institute of Technology) 

Prichard, Waldemar Landry, Jr Inverness, Miss. 

Ray, Morgan Gene Tullahoma, Tenn. 

Ray, Patrick Ryal Shelbyville, Tenn. 

Redd, William Frederick Birmingham, Ala. 

Reich, Merrill Dale, Jr Atlanta, Ga. 

Reichardt, Thomas James West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Reynolds, James Everett, Jr Grayson, Ala. 

Reynolds, Stephen Hammond Tampa, Fla. 

Richardson, John Holt Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Richardson, Jon Alan Athens, Tenn. 

Ridley, Charles Bromfield, Jr Rock Hill, S. C. 

Riggins, John Norman Ridgewood, N. J. 

Roberts, John Sharp Gillespy, Jr Birmingham, Ala. 

Rollins, Albert Perritt, Jr Charleston, S. C. 

Rountree, Michael Allen Del Rio, Tex. 

Rowe, Edward George Saluda, S. C. 

Russell, Edward Hughes, Jr Raleigh, N. C. 

*Rust, Roger Stuart Arlington, Fa. 

(Re-entering from George Washington University) 

Rust, Thomas Locke Arlington, Fa. 

Saltsman, George Spraker, Jr St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Scott, John Burt Wichita, Kans. 

Scott, Thomas Allen Madisonville, Ky. 

Seymour, Arthur Gloster, Jr Knoxville, Tenn. 

Shannon, Donald Lloyd Atlanta, Ga. 

Shannonhouse, Donald Gordon Sewanee, Tenn. 

Sherer, Alfred Dean, Jr Bloomington, III. 

Shultz, William Gray Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

Sims, Richard Landon Sparta, Tenn. 

♦Sloat, John Gregory, II Slidell, La. 

(Re-entering from Southeastern Louisiana College) 

Smith, Timothy Scott Kansas City, Mo. 

Smyth, Peter Ogden Charleston, S. C. 

Snowden, Charles Durkee, Jr Langhorne, Pa. 

Spaduzzi, Paul Edward Dallas, Tex. 

Stevens, Ralph Michael Boynton Beach, Fla. 

(Re-entering from University of Maryland) 

Stokes, Henry Arthur Jacksonville Beach, Fla. 

Strawbrldge, Allen Jackson, Jr Dresden, Tenn. 

(Re-entering) 

Sutton, David Parks Cleveland, Tenn. 

Sutton, John Thomas, III Kinston, N. C. 

Swisher, Robert Lee, Jr Ooltewah, Tenn. 

Talley, Bascom Destrehan, III Bogalusa, La. 



170 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Taylor Robert Alan Flintville, Tenn^ 

(Martin College) 

Tessmann, Paul John Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Thompson, John Lewis, III Houston, Tex. 

Tomb, Andrew Spencer, III Houston, Tex. 

Trask, David Stephens Hays, Kans. 

Upton, Donald Ray Soddy, Tenn. 

Urquhart, Douglas Russell Dallas, Tex^ 

Van Doren, Robert Lawson, Jr Columbia, S. C. 

Van Landingham, David Alan Starkville, Miss. 

Vehnekamp, William Ray Wapiti, Wyo.^ 

(Sheridan College) 

Vendrell, Alex Hector Decatur, Ga. 

Volk, Mark Juel Milwaukee, Wise. 

Wachter, Frederick Edward, Jr Painesville, Ohio 

Waddell, Thomas Edward McDonogh, Md. 

Walke, Ralph Meade Dublin, Ga. 

Walker, Allen Russell, Jr Salem, Fa. 

Wallace, Rodger Terry Allardt, Tenn. 

Walters, Rupert Adrian, Jr Sneads, Fla. 

Ward, Everett John, II Dallas, Tex. 

Waters, James Robert Hammond, La. 

Waters, Thad Howard, Jr Hammond, La. 

Watkins, David Sinclair Gary, Ind. 

Weathers, Walter Thornton, Jr Metcalfe, Miss. 

Wells, Warner McNeill, III Greenwood, Miss. 

Wharton, George Christopher West Hartford, Conn. 

Wheatley, Charles Hewitt Hatboro, Pa. 

(St. Lawrence University) 

Whitesell, Eric James Sewanee, Tenn. 

(University of Chicago) 

Wilder, Donald Adair Braintree, Mass. 

Williams, Calvin Kendall Birmingham, Ala. 

(Fisk University) 

Williams, James Oliver McKenzie, Tenn. 

Williams, John Louis St. Simon's Island, Ga. 

Wilson, James Farlow North field. III. 

Wilson, Paul Talbot Metairie, La. 

Wingfield, William, Jr Columbia, S. C. 

Winslow, Richard Clarke Winter Park, Fla. 

Wood, Robert Hancock, Jr Sewanee, Tenn. 

(Centre College) 

Yagura, Peter Isao Seabrook, N. J. 

Yang, Christopher Ta-Yung Berea, Ky. 

(Berea College) 

York, Richard Francis, Jr Newton, Mass. 



♦Entered Second Semester. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 17 1 

FRESHMEN WITH PREVIOUS COLLEGE EXPERIENCE 
(Less than 24 sem. hrs. and/or 18 qual. credits) 

Beck, Alan Paul Fort Werth, Tex. 

♦Blount, Winton Malcolm, III Montgomery, Ala. 

(University of Alabama) 

Brandon, John Ewing Nashville, Tenn. 

Brush, Charles Beeler Nashville, Tenn. 

(SS The University of the South) 

*Butler, David Arthur Tallahassee, Fla. 

(Florida State University) 

Campbell, Wilburn Welles Charlotte, N. C. 

(SS The University of the South) 

Catts, Austin Everett Atlanta, Ga. 

Chandler, Ralph Joseph Nashville, Tenn. 

(SS The University of the South) 

*Dailey, Warner Manning Far Hills, N. /. 

(Alfred University) 

Earls, Arthur Cleveland, III Nashville, Tenn. 

(SS The University of the South) 

*Eiland, Cecil Morgan Pensacola, Fla. 

(Pensacola Junior College) 

Gilbert, Lon Bascomb, III Chattanooga, Tenn. 

(SS The University of the South) 

Graham, Samuel Russell Austin, Tex. 

(University of Texas) 

Harwell, Jess Aldred, III Fort Worth, Tex. 

(SS The University of the South) 

*Haslbauer, Otto Frank, Jr N orris, Tenn. 

(University of Tennessee) 

Herring, Robert Freeman, III Newnan, Ga. 

(SS The University of the South) 

Hildebrand, Boren Shiner Tyler, Tex. 

Hunzlker, John Emil Pine Bluff, Ark. 

(SS Southern State College) 

Kicklighter, Joseph Allen Hazvkinsville, Ga. 

(SS Andrew College) 

King, Dewey Elton Sewanee, Tenn. 

(University of Tennessee) 

Lokey, Charles William, III Birmingham, Ala. 

(SS The University of the South) 

Love, Robert Calhoun Huntsville, Ala. 

(University of Alabama Center, Huntsville, Ala.) 

*Maddux, Robert Dixon, Jr Rome, Ga. 

(Re-entering) 

Mann, David Royall Mobile, Ala. 

(SS The University of the South) 

Mast, Adlai Travis, III Nacogdoches, Tex. 

(SS Stephen F. Austin University) 

Meigs, Frederick Fayerweather Roosevelt, N. J. 

(Re-entering) 

Morrison, Langdon Gates Cincinnati, Ohio 

(SS The University of the South) 

♦Moss, Samuel Guy, III Rome, Ga. 

(The Citadel) 

Nelson, William, III Nashville, Tenn. 

(SS Vanderbilt University) 



372 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

*Phelps, Gary Raymond Manchester, Conn. 

(University of Hartford) 

Porch, Ralph Douglas, III Anniston, Ala. 

(SS The University of the South) 

Rountree, Jack Wayne Del Rio, Tex. 

(SS TTie University of the South) 
*SajnanI, Arjun Lalchand New Delhi, India 

(New England College) 

Salter, Paul Broward, Jr Jesup, Ga. 

(SS The University of the South) 

Saussy, William Radcliffe Tampa, Fla. 

Shepherd, James Everett Bartow, Fla. 

Smith, Clarence McFerrin, Jr DeLand, Fla. 

(SS The University of the South) 

Stacpoole, Peter Wallace Mill Valley, Calif. 

(SS The University of the South) 

Stevenson, Richard Jean Cincinnati, Ohio 

Stockell, Albert Wright, III Nashville, Tenn. 

(SS The University of the South) 

*Terrill, Charles Madison Sewanee, Tenn. 

(Re-entering) 

Tucker, Beverley Randolph, III Richmond, Fa. 

Uden, James LeSueur Nashville, Tenn. 

(SS The University of the South) 

Vaughan, Jarman Russell Selma, Ala. 

(Re-entering) 

Webb, Joseph Cheshire Sewanee, Tenn. 

Wilheit, Philip Arthur Gainesville, Ga. 

Worthington, Joseph Muse, III Gibson Island, Md. 



*Entered Second Semester. 

FRESHMEN WITH NO PREVIOUS COLLEGE EXPERIENCE 

Abercrombie, John Joseph, Jr Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Abrams, Paul Trenholm Richland, Wash. 

Adair, Paul Haskins Atchison, Kans. 

Adams, Hunter Doherty Arlington, Fa. 

Albright, William Hunter Montgomery, Ala. 

Allen, Edwin Marshall, III Florence, S. C. 

Allison, William Peel Beaumont, Tex. 

Anderson, Daniel Jacksonville Beach, Fla. 

Armbrecht, Conrad Paterson Mobile, Ala. 

Bachmann, Carl Bowne Wheeling, W. Fa. 

Balsley, Thomas Taylor Reidsville, N. C. 

Bear, John Elliott Hope Hull, Ala. 

Beaumont, Henry Francis Sewanee, Tenn. 

Bell, John Robert Litchfield, III. 

Bell, Robert Kent Okeechobee, Fla. 

Berenguer, David Enrique, Jr Coral Gables, Fla. 

Blair, Conrad Allen Doraville, Ga. 

Boswell, Robert Blan Montgomery, Ala. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 173 

Bosworth, Edward Louis, III Rome, Ga. 

Bradley, Jerry Wayne Southern Pines, N. C. 

Brady, James Freiot Norfolk, Fa. 

Brewer, Richard Elliott Chandler, Okla. 

Brine, George Atkins Morganton, N. C. 

Brinson, Richard Shields Mobile, Ala. 

Brittain, James Maddox Roanoke, Ala. 

Brown, Charles Geoffrey Roanoke, Fa. 

Bruce, Robert Andrews, Jr Camden, S. C. 

Burnham, Francis Richard, II Ormond Beach, Fla. 

Butler, Mark Hilliard Cocoa Beach, Fla. 

Canale, John Dominic, III Germantown, Tenn. 

Capers, Rushton Trenholm Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Carbaugh, John Edward, Jr Greenville, S. C. 

Carson, Christopher Barrett Miami, Fla. 

Cavert, Peterson Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Cervone, David Merdith Knoxville, Tenn. 

Cheney, Curtis Van, Jr Reidsville, Ga. 

Clardy, James Clabom, Jr Sherwood, Tenn. 

Clewis, Richard Martm, III Tampa, Fla. 

Cole, Robert Grey Lexington, Fa. 

Conner, Ronald Parks Washington, D. C. 

Crichton, Andrew Donelson Nashville, Tenn. 

Cruse, John Woolfolk Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Cunnmgham, Lawrence Thomas Louisville, Ky. 

Daily, Thomas Allen Fort Smith, Ark. 

Daniel, William Russell, Jr Rome, Ga. 

Daunt, Francis Thomas Albany, Ga. 

Davenport, Mark Talbot Dallas, Tex. 

DeSaix, Peter Asheville, N. C. 

Dicus, Lawrence Milton San Antonio, Tex. 

Dolbeer, Richard Albert Jackson, Tenn. 

Dyson, Philip Porter Fairhope, Ala. 

Edwards, John Calvin Oakville, Conn. 

Elliott, Edward Everett, IV Oreland, Pa. 

Erwm, Thomas Sims Raleigh, N. C. 

Estes, Stephen Sandford Rome, Ga. 

Evans, William Dunbar, III Chester, Fa. 

Fisher, Thomas Wade Hampton Raleigh, N. C. 

Fite, William Howard Port St. Joe, Fla. 

Fitzhugh, William Jordan, Jr Yazoo City, Miss. 

Flye, Robert Braxton, Jr Raleigh, N. C. 

Forbes, James Tuck Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Francisco, Edward Allen Jacksonville, Fla. 

Frantz, Paul Thomasson Silver Spring, Md. 

Fray, Jackson Lee, III Ctdpeper, Fa. 

Freels, Archibald James, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. 

Frieman, Robert Lawrence Philadelphia, Pa. 



174 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Gaines, John Richard Lakeland, Fla. 

Garren, Donald Lee Brevard, N. C. 

Gibson, Ben Wright, III Sewanee, Tenn. 

Gibson, Herbert Cummins West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Gilchrist, Michael Lane Columbia, Tenn. 

Given, William Morris, III Birmingham, Ala. 

Glover, Alexander Graham Fort Pierce, Fla. 

Goeltz, Donald Robert Knoxville, Tenn. 

Goodwin, William Mark, III Catonsville, Md. 

Granstrom, David Marvin Plainjield, N. J. 

Greene, Bruce McGehee Auburn, Ala. 

Grove, John Pendleton, III Roanoke, Fa. 

Gummey, Frank Bird, III Gladwyne, Pa. 

Harper, William Bruce, Jr Beaufort, S. C. 

Harris, Frank Scott Nashville, Tenn. 

Harris, William Henry, III Smithfleld, N. C. 

Hay, William Pierce, III Farmville, Fa. 

Hayden, Donald Sidney Greenville, Miss. 

Hayes, John Calvin, III Rock Hill, S. C. 

Haynie, Warren Graham Demopolis, Ala. 

Hehmeyer, Philip Leland Memphis, Tenn. 

Hill, James Robert Louisville, Ky. 

Hinnant, James Bryant, III Jacksonville, Fla. 

Hisey, John Mayberry Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Holt, Charles Albert Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

Hunter, James David Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Hynson, Robert Gardiner Laurel, Miss. 

Iverson, Neal Jerome Mobile, Ala. 

Jardlne, Clyde Lawton, Jr Keokuk, Iowa 

Johnson, Henry Thomas Kingsport, Tenn. 

Jones, Richard Rodgers Tampa, Fla. 

Jones, Robert Pepin Charlottesville, Fa. 

Jordan, Joseph Boatwrlght Atlanta, Ga. 

Kettelhack, Robert Alan Amityville, N. Y. 

King, John Smith, III Memphis, Tenn. 

Kneedler, Paul Wayne Natchez, Miss. 

Knott, Richard Morrell St. Andrew's, Tenn. 

Korns, Richard Eubank Joplin, Mo. 

Kratz, Frederick William, III Kansas City, Mo. 

Lambeth, William Arnold, III Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Langley, Hiram Glazier, III Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Lanier, Hollls, Jr Albany, Ga. 

Lapham, Samuel Peyre Charleston, S. C. 

Lawhon, Thomas James Houston, Tex. 

Loftis, John Edgar, III Brevard, N. C. 

Lyles, James Morris, III Winnsboro, S. C. 

Lyon-Vaiden, William Shelton West River, Md. 

McCammon, George William Goulds, Fla. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 175 

McClanahan, Frank Chalmers, III Neligh, Neb. 

McDonald, John Albert Chickasaw, Ala. 

MlcLean, Leslie Hobert facksonville, Fla. 

Maggard, Elmer Clarence Hazard, Ky. 

Marynick, Samuel Philip Dallas, Tex. 

Mathewson, James Wallace, Jr Lyndonville, N. Y. 

May, John Donald Alexandria, Fa. 

VTazyck, Earle Farley Dothan, Ala. 

Meyer, James Charles Lexington, Ky. 

Milnor, William Henry, Jr Vienna, Fa. 

Mitchell, John Harris, Jr Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

Molloy, Newton Ford, Jr Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

Moon, Travis Waterbury Charlotte, N. C. 

Moore, Thomas Fulton Sezvanee, Tenn. 

Morganthaler, Robert Eric, Jr Prairie Village, Kans. 

Moxley, Darryl Jack Cincinnati, Ohio 

Murray, George Bliss Port Arthur, Tex. 

!^eblett, Wallace Ware, HI Greenville, Miss. 

SJorman, James Edward Pensacola, Fla. 

Morthup, Thomas Melton Santa Fe, N. M. 

I^oyes, Harry Floyd, HI Mobile, Ala. 

Dberdorfer, Richard Wallace Jacksonville, Fla. 

Dleson, Peter Christian Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Dlmsted, Frederick Erskme Rockville, Md. 

Drr, George Edward Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Dtey, Walter Madison, HI Talladega, Ala. 

Dwen, Blanton Hall Sezvanee, Tenn. 

Parker, Edward Frost, Jr Charleston, S. C. 

Parrish, Dorman Cheatham Nashville, Tenn. 

Paschall, David Hal McKenzie, Tenn. 

Pate, Alex Wilburn Birmingham, Ala. 

Pauls, Everett Cortes, Jr Dickinson, Tex. 

Payne, Terry Daniel Avondale Estates, Ga. 

Pegues, William Claudius La Marque, Tex. 

Peters, Robert Lynn, HI Kingsport, Tenn. 

Pogue, Charles Ray Huntland, Tenn. 

Polk, Albert Sidney, HI Baltimore, Md. 

Powell, Benjamin Phillip Union Springs, Ala. 

Price, Thomas Hosmer Meridian, Miss. 

R.aht, Scott Carlysle Graham Charleston, S. C. 

R.ainwater, Crawford Veazey, Jr Pensacola, Fla. 

R.eed, Gilpin Lyman Nezv Orleans, La. 

R.eed, John David, HI Nashville, Tenn. 

R.enner, Robert Nelson, Jr Weatherjord, Tex. 

R-ichle, Boyd Lynn Wichita Falls, Tex. 

Rogers, Gregory William Jacksonville, Fla. 

Roggeveen, Adrlaan Nicholas Little Silver, N. J. 

Rossmoore, Donald Forsythe Manhasset, N. Y. 



176 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Rutledge, Wesley Norrls Pensacola, Fla. 

Scarborough, Thomas Dillon Nashville, Tenn, 

Scheu, William Edward, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. 

Senette, Douglas John, Jr Franklin, La, 

Sheller, James Robert Lafayette, La. 

Sheppard, William Wilson, Jr Louisiana, Mo^ 

Shutze, Virgil Cox Atlanta, Ga. 

Smith, Joel Algernon, III Columbia, S. C. 

Spruill, Walker Duvall Cherazv, S. C. 

Stallworth, James Manly, Jr Charleston, S. C. 

Stanfill, Craig Mac El Paso, Tex. 

Steele, William Hardmg, Jr Louisville, Ky. 

Steenerson, Edward Lewis North Augusta, S. C. 

Steeves, James Alston Birmingham, Ala. 

Stevens, Lawrence Sterne Atlanta, Ga. 

Stevenson, Robert Fenton Baltimore, Md. 

Stirling, James Douglas Columbia, S. C 

Stone, Michael Lawrence Kingsport, Tenn. 

Story, Benjamin Sprague, III Jeffersonville, Ind. 

Strohl, Timothy David Hinsdale, III. 

Sturtevant, Joseph Edward, Jr Columbia, S. C. 

Summers, Byron Daniel Austin, Tex. 

Sumpter, William David, III Nashville, Tenn. 

Sundby, Stephen James Jacksonville, Fla. 

Sutton, James Andrew Madison, N. J. 

Swift, Garfield Christian, Jr Bethesda, Md. 

Taylor, John Champneys, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. 

Terry, Richard Bruce Cookeville, Tenn. 

Thornton, William Holladay, Jr Wilmington, N. C. 

Traver, Warren Lee Atlanta, Ga. 

Tucker, William Harner Athens, Ga. 

Tugwell, William Dudley, III Soddy, Tenn. 

Urquhart, Douglas Russell Dallas, Tex- 

Vassallo, George Castner Nashville, Tenn. 

Veal, David Barco Atlantic Beach, Fla 

VoUrath, Thomas La'chlan Kansas City, Mo. 

Walter, Peter Rucker Longmeadozv, Mass. 

Ward, Thomas Reid, Jr Meridian, Miss. 

Watklns, John Franklin, IV Prattville, Ala. 

Watklns, Miles Abernathy, III Birmingham, Ala. 

Webb, Roderick Cameron, Jr Panama City, Fla. 

Welch, Aaron Waddington, Jr Raleigh, N. C. 

Welch, Robert Ellis, Jr Raleigh, N. C. 

Wells, John Gay, Jr Nezvnan, Ga. 

White, John Richardson Hopkinsvlle, Ky. 

Whittington, William Lawrence, III Scranton, Pa. 

Wlnficld, Peter Martin Chatham, N. Y. 

Wise, Dwayne Allison Pidaski, Tenn. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 177 

Wood, Percy Hoxle, III Princeton, N. J. 

Yates, Thomas Allen Sewanee, Tenn, 



IRREGULAR CLASSIFICATION 
Higdon, Thomas Allen (Transient Student) Huntsvilh, Ala. 

(Part-time) 

Mauldin, James Davis Drane, Jr. (Transient Student) Baton Rouge, La. 

(Part-time) 

Silvertooth, Ernest Wayne (Special Student) Lynchburg, Tenn. 

♦Strange, Edwin Bruton, IV (Special Student) Greenville, Del. 

•Entered Second Semester. 



12 



178 



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 
SUMMARY 



Seniors 138 

Juniors 157 

Sophomores 214 

Freshmen with previous tollege work 37 

Freshmen with no previous college work 211 

Irregular classification 3 



ENTERED 
2ND. SEM. 

I 

5 
9 
10 
I 
I 



760 



27 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE 
FIRST SEMESTER 1963-64 



Alabama 66 

Arizona 2 

Arkansas 9 

California 6 

Connecticut 7 

Delaware 2 

District of Columbia . 2 

Florida 104 

Georgia 58 

Illinois 13 

Indiana 5 

Iowa 2 

Kansas 10 

Kentucky 18 

Louisiana 19 

Maine i 

Maryland 13 

Massachusetts 8 

Minnesota 2 

Mississippi 22 

Missouri 14 

Nebraska i 



New Jersey 9 

New Mexico 3 

New York 15 

North Carolina 30 

Ohio 12 

Oklahoma 8 

Pennsylvania 11 

South Carolina 55 

South Dakota i 

Tennessee 141 

Texas 54 

Virginia 25 

Washington 3 

West Virginia 2 

Wisconsin I 

Wyoming i 

Brazil i 

India 

Italy I 

Puerto Rico 2 

Switzerland i 

760 



ENTERED 

2ND. SEM, 

I 



27 



RELIGIOUS DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE 
FIRST SEMESTER 1963-64 



Baptist 34 

Christian ...,. 3 

Church of Christ .... 10 
Church of Christ, 

Scientist 2 

Church of God 3 

Congregational 6 

Disciples of Christ . . 5 

Episcopal 505 



ENTERED 
2ND. SEMJ 


Hindu 

Lutheran . . . . 
Methodist . . . 





4 

. 56 

. 17 

I 

• 24 
760 


ENTERED 
2ND. SEM. 

I 

I 




Presbyterian . 
Roman Cathol 
Unitarian . . . . 


ic 


3 


18 


No Affiliation 


Listed 


3 

27 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 179 

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY, SUMMER 1963 

*The Rev. Ernest N. Anderson Sand Springs, Okla. 

The Rev. Otto H. Anderson, Jr., B.D Norman, Okla. 

The Rev. Arthur W. Archer, S.T.B Monongahela, Pa. 

The Rev. Moss W. Armistead, B.S Edwardsville, III. 

The Rev. William T. Ashby, S.Th London, Ontario, Can. 

The Rev. Henry P. Auffrey, S.T.B Muscatine, Iowa 

The Rev. Leon C. Balch, B.D Chattanooga, Tenn. 

The Rev. George C. Bedell, B.D Tallahassee, Fla. 

The Rev. Robert A. Beeland, III, S.T.B Atlanta, Ga. 

*Mr. John D. Bolton Essex, Eng. 

The Rev. Thomas D. Bowers, B.D Washington, D. C. 

The Rev. Robert J. Boyd, Jr., B.D Richmond, Fa. 

The Rev. Chester D. F. Boynton, S.T.B Dundee, III. 

The Rev. Frederic S. Burford, III, B.D Rosenberg, Tex. 

The Rev. Charles F. Caldwell, B.D Tampa, Fla. 

The Rev. George H. Cave, Jr., S.T.B Marathon, Fla. 

Mrs. Mary Louise Chapman, M.A St. Andrew's, Tenn. 

♦The Rev. Alfred S. Christy, B.D Bunkie, La. 

The Rev. Holland B. Clark, B.D Baltimore, Md. 

The Rev. Kenneth E. Clarke, B.D Terrace Park, Ohio 

The Rev. Jonathan B. Coffey, B.D Miami Springs, Fla. 

The Rev. Robert M. Cooper, S.T.B Baton Rouge, La. 

The Rev. John W. Drake, Jr., B.D Greenville, N. C. 

The Rev. Alfred L. Durrance, B.D Maitland, Fla. 

The Rev. H. Thomas Foley, B.D Jackson, Mo. 

The Rev. Charles C. Green, B.D Chattanooga, Tenn. 

The Rev. Joseph N. Green, Jr., B.Th Norfolk, Fa. 

The Rev. John R. Hanson, B.D Everett, Mass. 

The Rev. Rogers S. Harris, B.D Greer, S.C. 

The Rev. Charles L. Henry, B.A Eufaula, Ala. 

The Rev. Bertram N. Herlong, B.D Valparaiso, Fla. 

The Rev. Robert E. Holzhammer, B.D Iowa City, Iowa 

The Rev. R. Channing Johnson, S.T.B Geneva, N. Y. 

•The Rev. Bruce M. Jones, B.D Southboro, Mass. 

The Rev. John P. Jones, Jr., B.D Memphis, Tenn. 

The Rev. Donald L. Karshner, B.D Cincinnati, Ohio 

The Rev. Boston M. Lackey, Jr., B.D Petersburg, Fa. 

*Mr. Floyd M. Lisle, M.A Fort Worth, Tex. 

The Rev. Arthur J. Lockhart, S.T.B Athens, Tex. 

The Rev. George E. Luck, Jr., S.T.B Arlington, Tex. 

The Rev. Frank B. Mangum, B.D Waco, Tex. 

The Rev. McAlIster C. Marshall, B.D Ashland, Fa. 

The Rev. Harry E. Maurer, B.D Kirksville, Mo. 

The Rev. William McClelland, Jr., B.D Roswell, Ga. 

The Rev. Robert S. McGInnis, Jr., B.D Augusta, Ga. 

The Rev. John McKee, III, B.D New Orleans, La. 



l80 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The Rev. Henry N. F. Minich, B.D West Hollywood, Fla. 

The Rev. Aurel H. Muntean, B.D Augusta, Ga. 

♦Mrs. Margaret J. H. Myers, B A Sewanee, Tenn. 

The Rev. John C. Parker, Jr., B.D Bessemer, Ala. 

The Rev. Roy E. Perry, B.D Huntland, Tenn. 

The Rev. William S. Pregnall, B.D Charleston, W. Fa. 

The Rev. Robert B. Rickard, B.D Washington, D. C. 

The Rev. Gordon P. Roberts, S.T.B Dickinson, N. Dak. 

The Rev. Max I. Salvador, B.D Miami, Fla. 

The Rev. Warren H. Scott, B.D Atlanta, Ga. 

The Rev. George H. Sparks, Jr., B.D Fountain Inn, S. C. 

*Mrs. June R. Sparks, A.B Fountain Inn, S. C. 

The Rev. Archie C. Stapleton, B.D Sagada, Mt. Prov., Philippines 

The Rev. Henry J. Stokes. B.D Macon, Ga. 

*Miss Thelma J. Straw Sewanee, Tenn. 

*Mr. Warner A. Strmger, A.B Sewanee, Tenn. 

The Rev. Derwent A. Suthers, B.D Williamston, Mich. 

The Rev. Robert D. Terhune, Jr., S.T.B Lake Park, Fla. 

The Rev. Martin R. Tilson, B.D Charlotte, N. C. 

The Rev. Kenneth R. Treat, S.T.B Jacksonville, Fla. 

The Rev. Arthur H. Underwood, S.T.B Washington, D. C. 

*Mr. Guy R. Usher. B.A Sewanee. Tenn. 

The Rev. Herbert J. Vandort, B.D Superior, Wis. 

The Rev. Edwin M. Ward, B.D Southboro, Mass. 

•Auditor 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1963-64 
SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 

SENIORS 

Agricola, Hugh Wilmer, Jr., A.B., (U. of Ala.), LL.B., (Emory U.), LL.B., (U. of 

Ala.) , Ala Gadsden, Ala. 

Beckwith, Peter Hess, A.B., (Hillsdale Coll.), Mich Jackson, Mich. 

Brown, Robert Joseph, B.A., (New York \J.), S. Fla Boca Raton, Fla. 

Carter, LeRoy McClure, A.B., (U. of Chatt.), Tenn Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Crews, Norman Dale, B.S. in Ed., (Ball State Teach. Coll.), 

Harnsburg Camp Hill, Pa. 

Fisher, William Bowlyne, B.S., (Memphis St.), Tenn Ripley, Tenn. 

Hilton, The Rev. Jerry Martin, B.A., (Millsaps), Methodist Monteagle, Tenn. 

Hobart, William Lansing, B.S.F., (U. of Mich.), M.F., (Duke), 

Ark Charlottesville, Fa. 

Hoyt, Calvin VanKirk, B.A., (Albright Coll.), Beth Shillington, Pa. 

Jones, Carl Eldridge, A.B., (Guilford Coll.), M.Ed., (U. of N. C), 

N. C Smithjield, N. C. 

Norcross, Walter Glen, (Flint Jun. Coll.), Mich Owosso, Mich. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS lb I 

Reece, Richard Douglas, B.A., (Memphis St.), Tenn Memphis, Tenn. 

Rines, Charles Tedford, A.B., (Fresno St.), Calif Salinas, Calif. 

Soto, Onell Asiselo, (U. of Havana), Cuba Havana, Cuba 

Stringer, Warner Armstrong, Jr., B.A., (Mar3^ille Coll.), Fla Jacksonville, Fla. 

White, Thomas Harrington, B.S., (U. of Houston), W. Tex Cibolo, Tex. 

Wright, Milton King, B.A., (William and Mary), S. Fa Hampton, Fa. 

MIDDLERS 

Abstein, William Robert, II, B.A., (Fla. St. U.), Fla Jacksonville, Fla 

Barney, David Marshall, B.A., (U. of Va.), S. C Towson, Md. 

Borom, James Robinson, A.B., (Oglethorpe U.), Atl Chamblee, Ga. 

tBurchell, Robert Latimer, B.Chm.En., (Cornell U.), Ky Paducah, Ky. 

Harmon, Robert Dale, B.A., (Lenoir Rhyne Coll.), W.N.C Bessemer City, N. G. 

James, William Evans, B.A., (Ga. St. Coll.), Atl Avondale Estates, Ga. 

Jones, Sidney Ross, B.A., (Tulane), Miss Woodville, Miss. 

Kehayes, Thomas Carl, B.A., (U. of N. C), E. C Edenton, N. C. 

Landers, Edward Leslie, Jr., B.A., (La. Coll.), La Alexandria, La. 

Livingston, William Cherry, (Presby. Coll.), U. S. C Cleveland, S. C. 

Marsh, Ralph Olin, A.B., (Emory U.), Atl Ft. Myers. Fla. 

Massey, Hoyt B., B.S., (Fla. St. U.), S. Fla Melbourne Beach, Fla. 

Pipes, Louie Noland, Jr., B.A., (Va. Mil. Inst.), La Rayville, La. 

Skilton, William Jones, B.S., (The Citadel), S. C Winter Park, Fla. 

Stubbs, Thomas McAlpin, Jr., A.B., (Harvard), LL.B., (U. of Ga.), Atl. Atlanta, Ga. 

Suellau, David Irving, (St. Petersburg Jun. Coll.), S. Fla St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Weller, Matthews, (The Citadel) , Fla Jacksonville, Fla. 

Wilson, Barclay DeVane, B.S., (Fla. St. U.), Fla Tallahassee, Fla. 



JUNIORS 

Abbott, Richard Taylor, B.S., (Howard Coll.), Ala Mobile, Ala. 

Boss, Michael Cleare, BA., (U. of So.), Fla Jacksonville, Fla. 

Brown, Julius Littleton Bunting, B.A., (Hampden-Sydney), 

S. Va Virginia Beach, Va. 

Caradine, Bill Charles, A.B., (Birmmgham-Southern), Ala Fairfield, Ala. 

Elwood, Richard Hugh, B.A., (Baylor U.), Tex Waco, Tex. 

Flynn, John Maurice, (Jones Bus. Coll.), Fla Jacksonville, Fla. 

Flynn, Michael Thomas, B.A., (U. of Calif.), Los Ang Burbank, Calif. 

Glover, Samuel Graham, LL.B., (U. of Ga.), Ala Mentone, Ala. 

Graner, James Frederick, B.A., (U. of Kansas City), Ala Birmingham, Ala. 

Hess, Cameron Mason, B.S., (Va. Poly. Inst.), M.S., (Richmond Prof. Inst.) 

Fla Christiansburg, Va. 

Jones, Cecil Baron, Jr., B.A., (U. of Miss.) Miss Columbus, Miss, 

Krumbach, Arthur William, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., (Mich. State U.), 

Ark - , Harrison, Ark. 

Law, James William, B.A., (Trinity Coll., Hartford), L. Island Haworth, N. J. 

tExchange student at Theological College, Edinburgh, Scotland, 1963-64. 



i82 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Luckett, Robert Leven, B.A., (La. Coll.), La Alexandria, La. 

McGinnIs, John Milton, B.M., M.M., (Peabody Coll.), Tenn Shelbyville, Ky. 

McMichael, Ralph Nelson, B.S., (La. Poly. Inst.), La Minden, La. 

Marble, Alfred Clark, Jr., B.A., (U. of Miss.), Miss Ficksburg, Miss. 

Mathieson, James West, B.A., (Lynchburg Coll.), S. Fa Hampton, Fa. 

Overman, Everett Franklin, B.S., (U. S. Naval Acad.), S. C Charleston, S. C. 

Poppell, William Ashton, B.S., (Fla. State U.), Fla Jacksonville, Fla. 

Poulos, George William, B.S., (U. of Ga.), Jtl Rome, Ga. 

Pradat, Ray William, B.S., (U. of Ala.), Miss Meridian, Miss. 

Risinger, William Harper, Jr., B.S., (So. St. Coll.), Ark El Dorado, Ark. 

Ross, Robert Layne, Jr., B.A., (Howard Coll.), Ala Birmingham, Ala 

Sharpe, Jack Temple, Jr., B.A., (U. of Tenn.), Tenn Knoxville, Tenn. 

Ware, Kenneth, B.A., (U. of So.), Tenn Little Rock, Ark. 

Williams, Theodore Martin, B.S., (U. S. Naval Acad.), Ala Atlanta, Ga. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

•Bolton, John Donald, (Theological Coll.), Edinburgh Essex, Eng 

^Burgon, George Irvme, (Theological Coll.), 

Glasgow and Galloway Glasgow, Scotland 

'Camp, Thomas Edward, B.A., (Centenary Coll.), M.S. in L.S., 

(La. St. U.) Sewanee, Tenn. 

Home, George Everette, Jr., Rev., B.A., (Wabash Coll.), Atl Rome, Ga. 

Kirby, Rodman Pattee, Rev., B.S., (SW Tex. St. Teachers Coll.), MA., 

(Mid. Tenn. St. Coll.), Tenn • Sewanee, Tenn. 

Moxley, Maurice Martm, (U. of S. C), Z7. S. C Columbia, S. C. 

•Seymour, Ira Patterson, B.D., (Fla. St.), Fla Jacksonville Beach, Fla. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 

'^ritchartt, Paul Waddell, Rev., B.D., (U. of So.), Tenn Nashville, Tenn. 

^Exchange Student 

^Second Semester only, 1963-64. 

♦Non-resident student on Pastoral Theology Internship. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 



Robert G. Snowden, B.S., Chairman, Memphis, Tennessee. 

Rt. Rev. Charles C. J. Carpenter, D.D., Chancellor, Birmingham, 

Alabama. 
Edward McCrady, Ph.D., LL.D., Sc.D., L.H.D., V ice-Chancellor, Se- 

wanee, Tennessee. 
Rt. Rev. George M. Murray, D.D., Birmingham, Alabama. 
Rev. Charles F. Schilling, B.A., B.D., Hollywood, Florida. 
L. Kemper Willdvms, D.C.L., New Orleans, Louisiana. 
Harvey G. Booth, Atlanta, Georgia. 
Rev. Harold C. Gosnell, D.D., San Antonio, Texas. 
G. Allen Kimball, L.L.B., Lake Charles, Louisiana. 
Rt. Rev. E. PLvmilton West, D.D., Jacksonville, Florida. 
Rt. Rev. Robert R. Brov^^n, D.D., Little Rock, Arkansas. 
Rev. E. Dudley Colhoun, Jr., B.A., B.D., Winston-Salem, Nortb 

Carolina. 
R. Eugene Orr, A.B., Jacksonville, Florida. 
Henry O. Weaver, B.S., Houston, Texas. 
David B. Collins, B.A., B.D., S.T.M., Acting Secretary, Sewanee^ 

Tennessee. 



legal title of the university 
"THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH" 



184 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
THE BISHOPS 

Rt. Rev. Charles C. J. Carpenter, D.D., Bishop of Alabama, Chancellor, and President 

of the Board. 
Rt. Rev. Arthur C. Lichtenberger, D.D., Presidmg Bishop. 
Rt. Rev. Frank A. Juhan, D.D., Retired Bishop. 
Rt. Rev. Albert S. Thomas, D.D., Retired Bishop. 
Rt. Rev. William Scarlett, D.D., Retired Bishop. 
Rt. Rev. Robert E. Gribbin, D.D., Retired Bishop. 
Rt. Rev. Charles Clingman, D.D., Retired Bishop. 
Rt. Rev. John J. Gravatt, D.D., Retired Bishop. 
Rt. Rev. Duncan M. Gray, D.D., Bishop of Mississippi. 
Rt. Rev. Everett H. Jones, D.D., Bishop of West Texas. 
Rt, Rev. Henry I. Louttit, D.D., Bishop of South Florida. 
Rt. Rev. C. Avery Mason, S.T.D., Bishop of Dallas. 
Rt. Rev. Thomas H. Wright, D.D., Bishop of East Carolina. 
Rt. Rev. John E. Hines, D.D., Bishop of Texas. 
Rt. Rev. William R. Moody, D.D., Bishop of Lexington. 
Rt. Rev. George H. Quarterman, D.D., Bishop of Northwest Texas. 
Rt. Rev. M. George Henry, D.D., Bishop of Western North Carolina. 
Rt. Rev. E. Hamilton West, D.D., Bishop of Florida. 
Rt. Rev. Girault M. Jones, D.D., Bishop of Louisiana. 
Rt. Rev. Randolph R. Claiborne, D.D., Bishop of Atlanta. 
Rt. Rev. Richard H. Baker, D.D., Bishop of North Carolina. 
Rto Rev. Iveson B. Noland, D.D., Bishop Coadjutor of Louisiana. 
Rt. Rev. George M. Murray, D.D., Bishop Coadjutor of Alabama. 
Rt. Rev. C. Gresham Marmion, D.D., Bishop of Kentucky. 
Rt. Rev. John J. M. Harte, D.D., Suffragan Bishop of Dallas. 
Rt. Rev. Albert R. Stuart, D.D., Bishop of Georgia. 
Rt. Rev. John Vander Horst, D.D., Bishop of Tennessee. 
Rt. Rev. Richard E. Dicus, D.D., Suffragan Bishop of West Texas. 
Rt. Rev. Frederick P. Goddard, S.T.D., Suffragan Bishop of Texas. 
Rt. Rev. Robert R. Brown, D.D., Bishop of Arkansas. 
Rt. Rev. George L. Cadigan, D.D., Bishop of Missouri. 
Rt. Rev. Thomas A. Eraser, Jr., D.D., Bishop Coadjutor of North Carolina. 
Rt, Rev. Gray Temple, D.D., Bishop of South Carolina. 
Rt. Rev. John M. Allin, D.D., Bishop Coadjutor of Mississippi. 
Rt. Rev. James L. Duncan, D.D,, Suffragan Bishop of South Florida. 
Rt. Rev. William L. Hargrave, D.D., Suffragan Bishop of South Florida. 
Rt. Rev. William E. Sanders, D.D., Bishop Coadjutor of Tennessee. 
Rt. Rev. Theodore H. McCrea, ST.D., Suffragan Bishop of Dallas. 
Rt. Rev. John A. Pinckney, D.D.. Bishop of Upper South Carolina. 

Note: Retired Bishops are Honorary Members of the Board of Trustees. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 1 85 

CLERICAL AND LAY TRUSTEES 

Alabama— V.tv. John C. Turner, Herbert E. Smith, Nicholas H. Cobbs. 

Arkansas— Ktv. J. Rayford McLean, Ralph J. Speer, Jr., Leonard N. White, Jr. 

Atlanta — Rev. P. Roberts Bailey, Daniel A. McKeever, Seaton C. Bailey. 

Dallas— Rev. Emmett M. Waits, Peter O'Donnell, Jr., Edward Nash. 

East Carolina — Rev. Charles L Penick, Walker Taylor, Jr., William H. Smith. 

Florida — Rev. Robert S. Snell, W. Sperry Lee, Eugene Orr. 

Georgia — Rev. A. Nelson Daunt, John H. Sherman, Henry H. Burnet. 

Kentucky — Rev. J. F. G. Hopper, William E. Bessire, James R. Rash, Jr. 

Lexington — Rev. Canon A. Person, Jr., Morgan Soaper, Rexford S. Blazer. 

Louisiana — Rev. Robert C. Witcher, George M. Snellings, Joel L. Fletcher. 

Mississippi — Rev. Charles T. Chambers, Jr., D.A. Elliott, Duncan C. Green.t 

Missouri — Rev. Harry E. Maurer, William C. Honey, George Dexheimer. 

NoHh Carolina — Rev. Martin R. Tilson, Joseph Q. McCallum, Henry T. Clark, Jr. 

Northwest Texas — Rev. William E. West, J. R. Anderson, Joe Earnest. 

South Carolina — Rev. Edward B. Guerry, B. Allston Moore, Berkeley Grimball. 

South Florida — Rev. James R. Brumby, Robert T. Anderson, Rhonnie Andrew Duncan. 

Tennessee — *Rev. Prentice A. Pugh, emeritus. Rev. William G. Pollard, Troy Beatty, 

Jr., Alexander Guerry, Jr. 
Texas — Rev. Charles J. Dobbins, Rutherford R. Cravens, Joe W. Dickerson, M.D. 
Upper South Carolina — Rev. Thomas A. Roberts, Samuel Boykin, Hasell T. LaBorde. 
West Texas — Rev. Thomas H. Morris, William HoUis Fitch, Robert M. Ayers, Jr. 
Western North Carolina — Rev. Robert E. Johnson, James Y. Perry, Sr., Robert L. 

Ha den. 
Associated Alumni — John P. Guerry, Rev. E. Dudley Colhoun, Jr., Richard Moray 

Hart, John W. Woods, Rt. Rev. David S. Rose, Edward B. Crosland, George M. 

Sadler, Jr. 
University Faculties — Rev. Charles L. Winters, Jr., Th.D., Arthur B. Dugan, B.Litt., 

Stephen E. Puckette, Ph.D., Norman T. Dill, BA. 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees — Rev. David W. Yates, Sewanee, Tennessee. 



*Deceased, July 26, 1963. 
tDeceased, May 8, 1964. 



1 86 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

THE ASSOCIATED ALUMNI 

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Officers, 1963-64 

John P. Guerry, '49, President Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

R. Morey Hart, '34., Vice-Fresident for Church Sup-port Pensacola, Fla. 

Rt. Rev. John M. Allin, '43, Vice-President for School of Theology . . Jackson, Miss. 

I. Rhett Ball, III, '34, Vice-President for Capital Funds High Point, N. C 

Frederick R. Freyer, '29, Vice-President for Bequests Coral Gables, Fla. 

Dudley C. Fort, '34, Vice-President for Regions Nashville, Tenn. 

James W. Gentry, Jr., '50, Vice-President for Admissions Chattanooga, Tenn. 

W. Sperry Lee, '43, Vice-President for Classes Jacksonville, Fla. 

Ben Humphreys McGee, '49, Vice-President for SMA Leland, Miss. 

Philip B. Whitaker, '55, Recording Secretary Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

F. Clay Bailey, '50, Treasurer Nashville, Tenn. 

Arthur Ben Chitty, '35, Executive Director and Editor of Sewanee News 

Sewanee, Tenn. 
Rt. Rev. Frank A. Juhan,' 11, Chairman for Second Century Fund Sewanee, Tenn. 



ST. LUKE'S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
Officers, 1963-64 

Tracy H. Lamar, T'42, President Knoxville, Tenn. 

Robert E. Ratelle, T'47, Vice-President Alexandria, La. 

Julian L. McPhillips, T'62, Secretary Montgomery, Ala. 

SEWANEE MILITARY ACADEMY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Officers, 1963-64 

B. Humphreys McGee, A'42, President Leland, Miss. 

Harding Woodall, A'13, Vice-President Sewanee, Tenn. 

Douglas L. Vaughan, Jr., A'30, C'3S, Treasurer Sewanee, Tenn. 

C. Quintard Wigginsi, HI, A'56, Alumni Director Sewanee, Tenn. 



COMMENCEMENT DAY 1 87 

COMMENCEMENT DAY 

June 10, 1963 



Latin Salutatory 

Stephen Harold Moorehead Florida 

University Oration 

Harold Holmes Helm, B.A., LL.D., D.C.S New York 

Valedictory Oration 

Joseph Levering Price Mississippi 



AWARD OF MEDALS AND PRIZES 

The Guerry Award for Excellence in English 

Robert Laidlaw Brown Arkansas 

The E. G. Richmond Prize for Social Science 

Stephen Harold Moorehead Florida 

The Ruggles-Wright Medal for French 

Preston Brooks Huntley, Jr South Carolina 

The Isaac Marion Dwight Medal for Greek 

James Arthur Patrick Tennessee 

The Chattanooga Area Historical Society's Prize 
for Excellence in American History 

Charles Stephen Little Hoover Ohio 

The George Thomas Shettle Prize in The School of Theology 
for the Best Reading of a Prayer Book Service 

George Charles Brower New York 

The Algernon Sydney Sullivan Medallion for Character 

Edwin Irby Hatch, Jr Georgia 

The Henry Stanley Allan Award for Imaginative Writing 

Michael McConnell Cass Georgia 



AWARD OF SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 1963-64 

The Atlee Heber Hoff Memorial Scholarship for Attainment in Economics 

Lacy Harris Hunt, II Texas 

The Louis George Hoff Memorial Scholarship for Attainment in Chemistry 

Walter Bruce Gibson Connecticut 



1 88 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The Susan Beatty Memorial Prize 
Awarded to the student who makes the greatest improvement in General Chemistry 

Harrill Coleman McGmnis Tennessee 

The Ruge Scholarships for Honor Students from Florida 

Harry Livingston Babbit, Jr., for Senior Year Port St. Joe 

John Bagster Fretwell, for Junior Year Coral Gables 

Ricardo Palomares, Jr., for Sophomore Year Miami 

The Thomas O'Connor Scholarship 
for Highest Scholastic Attainment for Three Years 

Robert Guerard Dillard Tennessee 

The Charles Pollard Marks Scholarship 

for Outstanding Junior Gownsman 

David G. DeVore, III Ohio 



STUDENTS ELECTED TO MEMBERSHIP IN PHI BETA KAPPA 
SINCE JUNE 1962 

Elected as Juniors 
David G. DeVore, III 
Robert Guerard Dillard 

Elected as Seniors 

Robert Laidlaw Brown Harry Copeland MuUikin 

Carl Copeland Cundiff Samuel Francis Pickering, Jr. 

Evans Emmett Harrell Joseph Levering Price 

Charles Stephen Little Hoover Webb Lindsley Wallace 

Christopher John Horsch Thomas Turner Wilheit, Jr. 
Robert MacKenzie Kauffman 



CONFERRING OF DEGREES 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Bachelor of Arts 

Conrad Stanton Babcock, III (English) Portola Valley, Cal. 

Brian Ward Badenoch (Mathematics) Watertown, S. D. 

Nathaniel Ingraham Ball, III (History) {In absentia) Charleston, S. C. 

Charles Ray Bell (Economics) Wartrace, Tenn. 

Frank Arnold Bennett, III (Economics) Miami, Fla. 

Peyton Dandridge Bibb, Jr. (English) Birmingham, Ala. 

Allie Milling Blalock (Political Science) Clinton, S. C. 

Joseph Alexander Brittain, Jr. (English) Roanoke, Ala. 

Walter Phillips Brooke (English) (cum Laude) Sewanee, Tenn. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 1 89 

Noel Llewellyn Brown (Political Science) Brentwood, Tenn. 

Robert Laidlaw Brown (English) {Magna cum Laude) Little Rock, Ark. 

Richard Stockton Brush (English) Nashville, Tenn. 

Jeffrey Wayne Buntin (History) Nashville, Tenn. 

John Wescott Buss (Political Science) {cum Laude) Hamilton, 111. 

Paul Armand Calame, Jr. (Economics) Memphis, Tenn. 

David Edward Campbell (Chemistry) Longviezv, Tex. 

Thomas Macnab Carlson (English) {cum Laude) Atlanta, Ga. 

Ewing Everett Carruthers (History) Charleston, S. C. 

Michael McConnell Cass (English) Macon, Ga. 

David Denty Cheatham (History) Pulaski, Tenn. 

David Culbreth Clough, Jr. (French) , Sewanee, Tenn. 

Harry Howard Cockrill, Jr. (Biology) {cum Laude) Little Rock, Ark. 

Townsend Sanders Collins, Jr. (Economics) Opelika, Ala. 

John Stewart Connor (Mathematics) Birmingham, Ala. 

Fowler Faine Cooper, Jr. (History) Memphis, Tenn. 

Talbert Cooper, Jr. (English) Rochester, Minn. 

David Friend Cox, Jr. (Mathematics) Owensboro, Ky. 

Charles Metcalf Crump, Jr. (French) Memphis, Tenn 

Carl Copeland Cundiff (Political Science) {cum Laude) Tulsa, Okla. 

Michael Maurice DeBakey (English) {In absentia) Houston, Tex. 

Gerald Louis DeBIois (History) {cum Laude) Metairie, La. 

Frank Calhoun DeSaix (English) Asheville, N. C. 

William Williams Deupree, Jr. (Political Science) Memphis, Tenn. 

Eugene McNulty Dickson (Fine Arts) {cum Laude) Columbia, S. C. 

John Simonton Douglas, Jr. (Chemistry) {cum Laude) North Augusta, S. C. 

Richard Tilghman Earle, HI (Political Science) St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Berryman Wheeler Edwards, Jr. (English) Cedartown, Ga. 

Malcolm Edward Edwards, Jr. (Biology) (Chemistry) Decatur, Ala. 

Charles Edmund Ellis, Jr. (Political Science) Tullahoma, Tenn. 

Hubert Edward Ellzey, Jr. ( Economics ) Metairie, La. 

David Edward Emenheiser (History) {cum Laude) Bensenville, III. 

James Thomas Ettien (English) Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Robert Arnold Freyer (History) Coral Gables, Fla. 

Richard James Frye (Economics) Perry, Fla. 

Thomas Allen Gaskin, HI (Biology) Birmingham, Ala. 

Harry Carter Gerhart (English) Abilene, Tex. 

Lester Samuel Gill, Jr. (Biology) {cum Laude) Soddy, Tenn. 

Richard Bamford Greene (English) {cum Laude) Demopolis, Ala. 

John Alan Griswold (History) West Newton, Mass. 

James Sanders Guignard (French) Columbia, S. C. 

Thomas Morris Guyton, Jr. (Economics) Hartselle, Ala. 

Charles Mack Hall (Chemistry) {cum Laude) Bl Dorado, Ark. 

Evans Emmett Harrell (History) {cum Laude) Jacksonville, Fla. 

George Barrow Hart, Jr. (Philosophy) Memphis, Tenn. 

Edwin Irby Hatch, Jr. (Biology) Atlanta, Ga, 

Eugene Hargrove Hawkins, Jr. (Economics) {cum Laude) Birmingham, Ala. 

Caldwell Leyden Haynes (Economics) Jacksonville, Fla. 



190 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Rayford Balnes High, Jr. (Philosophy) Houston, Tex. 

James Eugene Hildreth, Jr. (Spanish) Baton Rouge, La. 

Charles Stephen Little Hoover (History) {Magna cum Laude) . . Shaker Heights, Ohio 

Christopher John Horsch (Political Science) {cum Laude) Newnan, Ga. 

William Robert Hudgins (Chemistry) Memphis, Tenn. 

Preston Brooks Huntley, Jr. (French) Cheraw, S. C. 

Sands Kenyon Irani (Biology) Chevy Chase, Md. 

Robert MacKenzie Kauffman (Mathematics) (Physics) {cum Laude) 

Crystal Lake, III. 

Walter Warren King (Economics) Atlantic Beach, Fla. 

George Eugene Lafaye, HI (Political Science) Columbia, S. C. 

Jack Finney Lane, Jr. (History) {cum Laude) Olivet, France 

Allen Langston, Jr. (History) Raleigh, N. C. 

George Edward Lewis, II (Political Science) {In absentia) Tallahassee, Fla. 

William Oscar Lindholm, Jr. (Economics) {In absentia) Wilmette, III. 

James Clarence McDonald (History) Southern Pines, N. C. 

Otis Wayne McGregor, Jr. (Physics) Baton Rouge, La. 

James Callam McKenna (Chemistry) Bradenton, Fla. 

George Edmondson Maddox (English) Rome, Ga. 

Lamont Major, Jr. (Economics) {In absentia) Birmingham, Ala. 

Francis Clough Marbury (English) Trussville, Ala. 

Ralph Stanley Marks (Economics) Montgomery, Ala. 

Walter Scott Martin (History) Savannah, Ga. 

Andrew Paul Mesterhazy (Political Science) Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Charles Thomas Midyette, HI (Philosophy) Nezv Bern, N. C. 

Peter Melville Moore (Economics) Galveston, Tex. 

Stephen Harold Moorehead (Economics) {Summa cum Laude) Cocoa, Fla. 

Harry Copeland Mullikin (Mathematics) {cum Laude) Georgetown, Ky. 

Peter Allen Myll (Political Science) Louisville, Ky. 

Paul Thomas Pandolfi (Political Science) Homewood, III. 

Ralph Fairchild Penland, Jr. (Physics) {cum Laude) Florence, Ala. 

William Walker Pheil (Mathematics) St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Samuel Francis Pickering, Jr. (English) {Magna cum Laude) Nashville, Tenn. 

Brian Kenneth Pierce (Mathematics) Coral Gables, Fla. 

Wallace Randall Pinkley (Economics) Huntingdon, Tenn. 

Frank Lucius Pinney, HI (Political Science) Yorktown, Fa. 

Joseph Levering Price (Chemistry) {Summa cum Laude) Meridian, Miss. 

Scott Stephen Rathman (History) San Francisco, Cal. 

Franklin Elmore Robson, HI (Economics) Charleston, S. C. 

John Sevier Rose (English) Columbia, Tenn. 

Moody Whitson Sadler (Economics) {cum Laude) Manhassett, N. Y. 

James Oran Sanders, HI (History) New Orleans, La. 

John Taylor Shepherd (Biology) Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Alex Barnes Shipley, Jr. (Political Science) Knoxville, Tenn. 

James Markham Sigler (Political Science) Corpus Christi, Tex. 

Bruce Arthur Smith (History) Webster Groves, Mo. 

John Charleston Smith, Jr. (Philosophy) Madison, Tenn. 

Warren Delano Smith, Jr. (Biology) Acworth, Ga. 



DEGREES CONFERRED I9I 

Joe Kendall Steele, Jr. (Biology) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Michael Norman Stow (Economics) Cocoa, Fla. 

Gerald Howard Summers (Economics) Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Murray Rudolph Summers (Chemistry) Birmingham, Ala. 

Daniel Farrington Tatum, Jr. (Economics) Marked Tree, Ark. 

Vance Johnson Tliomton, Jr. (Political Science) Huntsville, Ala. 

Wheeler Mellette Tillman (Political Science) Charleston, S. C. 

Ash ton King Tomlinson (Biology) Lake Wales, Fla. 

John Gladden TuUer (French) Columbia, S. C. 

John Walton Turner (Economics) Magnolia Springs, Ala. 

Guy Randolph Usher (Philosophy) Dallas, Tex. 

Stephen Robert Vaughan (Political Science) Upperville, Fa. 

Webb Lindsley Wallace (Political Science) {Magna cum Laude) Dallas, Tex. 

Richard Dexter Warren (Political Science) Bethesda, Md. 

David Dudley Webbe (English) Highlands, N. C. 

William McComb Weyman (Fine Arts) Atlanta, Ga. 

Frank Phillips White, Jr. (Political Science) {cum Laude) Lewisburg, Tenn. 

Thomas Turner Wilheit, Jr. (Physics) {cum Laude) Gainesville, Ga. 

Wade Stout Williams (Political Science) {cum Laude) Chicago, III. 

Charles Robert Wimer (Mathematics) El Dorado, Ark. 

Thomas Reginald Wise, II (Political Science) {cum Laude) Houston, Tex. 

Ronald Ray Zodin (English) Fort Worth, Tex. 

Bachelor of Science in Forestry 

Allan Richard Applegate Memphis, Tenn. 

Brian Wayne Rushton Memphis, Tenn. 

Henry Phillip Sasnett Jacksonville, Fla. 



SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 

Bachelor of Divinity 

Jackson Cunningham Biggers, B.A. {Mississippi) Corinth, Miss. 

George Donald Black, B.A. {Southern Virginia) Waynesboro, Ga. 

John Wright Blow, BA. {Alabama) Auburn, Ala. 

Alberry Charles Cannon, Jr., A.B. {Upper South Carolina) {Optime Merens) 

Greenville, S. C. 

William Gedge Gayle, Jr., B.S. {Louisiana) Lake Charles, La. 

Clarence Murray Lancaster, Jr., BA. {Arkansas) {Optime Merens) 

Forrest City, Ark.' 

Albert Davidson Lewis, III, B.A. {Louisiana) Alexandria. La. 

Victor Virgil McGuire, Jr., B.A. {Western North Carolina) Asheville, N. C. 

David Stansbury Remington, B.A. {Maryland) Baltimore, Md. 

Timothy Churchill Trively, B.S. {North Carolina) Clemson, S. C. 

James Tracy White, B.A. {Southwestern Virginia) Orlando, Fla 

Richard Irvin zumBrunnen, B.A. {Maryland) Salisbury, N. C 



192 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Licentiate in Theology 

Jack Dea Adams, Jr. {Southern Virginia) Manteo, N. C 

Nicholas Albanese, B.A. {Bethlehem) Wind Gap, Pa. 

Thomas Copes Barnes, B.A. ( Virginia) Richmond, Fa. 

Victor Malcolm Bircher, B.A. {Missouri) Salem, Mo. 

George Charles Brower {Nezv York) {In absentia) Mamaroneck, N. Y. 

Jean Henry Chance, B.S. {Florida) Tallahassee, Fla. 

Richard Sheffield Covington, B.S. {North Carolina) Wadesboro, N. C. 

Robert Clyde Johnson, Jr., B A. {Florida) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Ralph Edgar Kelley {Florida) Gulf Breeze, Fla. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 

Master of Sacred Theology 

The Rev. Jack Marion Bennett, B.D Hendersonville, N. C. 

The Rev. James Arthur Patrick, B.D Nashville, Tenn. 

The Rev. Walter Morris Zeanah, B.D. {In absentia) Seymour, Tex. 



DEGREES HONORIS CAUSA 

Doctor of Civil Law 

Richard Walker Boiling, B.A., M.A Washington, D. C. 

Frank Morgan Gillespie, Sr., B.A San Antonio, Tex. 

Harold Holmes Helm, BA., LLD., D.C.S New York, N. Y. 

Doctor of Divinity 

The Rev. Edmund Dargan Butt, G.D., B.D., S.T.M Evanston, III. 

The Rev. Eric Sutcliffe Greenwood, B.A., B.D Mem-phis, Tenn. 

The Rev. Edward Gordon Mullen, B.S., B.D Florence, Ala. 

Doctor of Sacred Theology 
The Rev. Kenneth Woolltombe, B.A., M.A. Oxon New York, N. Y. 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Academic Requirements 49-So 

Academic Hoods 103 

Academic Year 47 

Administration, Officers of 24-28 

Admission, to the University 31 

Early Decision Plan 4S-46 

Requirements for the College 43-45 

Requirements for the School of Theology 100 

Advanced Standmg 46 

Advising System 47 

Airport 37 

Air Science, Instruction in 54-57 

Art Gallery 33 

Associated Alumni, Officers of 186 

Associations, Educational 31 

Athletics 35 

Automobiles 40 

Aviation 35 

Band 84 

Biology, Instruction in 57-59 

Board of Regents 183 

Board of Trustees 184-185 

Buildmgs 12-16 

Calendar, of the College 4 

Of the School of Theology 5 

Cap. and Gown 40 

Certificate, Admission by 44-45 

Chemistry, Instruction in 59-6i 

Choir 84 

Civil Engineering, Instruction in 61-62 

Classical Languages, Instruction in 62-64 

Classification of Students 48 and 100 

Clinical Traming Program 105 

College Board Examinations 43-44 

Commencement, 1963 187-192 

Committees, of the University 29 

Of the College 42 

Of the School of Theology 98 

Comprehensive Examinations, m the College 5^ 

Courses Required in the College • • . 5i 

Courses of Study, in the College 54-95 

In the School of Theology 109-115 

In the Graduate School of Theology 121-122 

In the Summer Institute i • 128-129 

Cum Laude 52 



194 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

PACK 

Credit by Examination Si-52 

Curriculum in the School of Theology 105-108 

Degrees: 

Applications for 50 

Awarded in 1963 188-192 

Conferred by the University 31 and 50 

Requirements for B.A. and B.S. in Forestry 50-52 

Requirements for B J) loi 

Requirements for Mj\.T 126-127 

Requirements for S.T.M 118 

With Honors 52 and 102 

Discipline 33-34 

Domain and Buildings 12-16 

Dormitories 14 and 38 

Economics, Instruction in 65-67 

Engineering, Combined Plan 52-53 

Engineering, Instruction in 61-62 

English, Instruction m 68-69 

Entrance Certificates 44-45 

Entrance Exammations 43-44 

Expenses 36-39 

In the College , 36 

In the School of Theology 36 

In the Graduate School of Theology 119-120 

Faculty of the University 17-23 

Faculty of the Graduate School of Theology 120-122 

Faculty of the Summer Institute of Science and Mathematics 130 

Fees: 

In the College 36-39 

In the School of Theology 36 

In the Graduate School of Theology 119-120 

Fine Arts, Instruction in 69-72 

Forestry, Instruction in 72-76 

Fraternities 34 

French, Instruction m 76-77 

German, Instruction in 78 

Gownsmen, Order of 33-34 

Eligibility for 48-4.9 

Grading System 48 

Graduate School of Theology 117-123 

Graduation Reauirements 50 and 101 

Greek: 

Instruction in the College ^3-^ 

Instruction in the School of Theology ♦ . 109-111 



INDEX 195 

PAGE 

Hebrew, Instruction in 109 

History, Instruction m 79-Si 

History, Church, Instruction in 113 

History and objectives 7-11 

Honor Code 34 

Honors, Awarded m 1963 187-188 

Hoods 103 

Hospital 13 

Information, General 31-40 

Instruction, Officers of 17-23 

Laboratory Fees 36 

Late Registration 36 and 47 

Latin, Instruction in 64 

Laundry 39 

Lectures and Concerts 34-35 and 1 16 

Library 14 and 31-32 

Licentiate m Theology loi 

Literary Societies 34 

Location 12 

Major Requirements 51 

Mathematics, Instruction in 81-83 

Matriculation 47 

Matrons 27 

Medals: 

Awarded in 1963 187 

In the Air Force ROTC 153 

In the College 151 

In the School of Theology 152 

Military Service 35 

Mountain Goat 40 

Music, Instruction in 84 

National Affiliations 31 

New Testament, Instruction m 109-111 

Objectives, Educational 7-11 

Old Testament, Instruction in 109 

Optime Merens 102 

Organizations 34 

Pan-Hellenic Council 34 

Phi Beta Kappa 34 

Philosophy, Instruction in 84-87 

Physical Education, Instruction in 87 

Physical Exammation 44 

Physics, Instruction m 88-89 



196 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

PAGE 

Political Science, Instruction in 89-92 

Pre-Medical Curriculum S3 

Prescribed Courses 51 

Pre-Theological Course 104 

Press, University 39-40 

Prizes: 

In the College 151-152 

In the School of Theology 152 

Proctors, Student 27 

Professional Schools, Preparation for 52-53 

Psychology, Instruction in 92 

Publications, Student 40 

Public Speaking, Instruction in 93 

Purple, Sewanee 40 

Quality Credits 48 

Quantity Credits 48 

Re-admission 50 

Regents, Board of 183 

Register of Students: 

In the College 158-177 

In the School of Theology 180-182 

In the Graduate School of Theology 179-180 

In the Summer Institute 156-157 

In the Summer School 157-158 

Registration 47 and 100 

Religion, Instruction in 93-94 

Religious Life 32-33 

Required Courses 50 and 101-108 

Requirements, Academic 49-50 

Room Assignments 47 

Russian, Instruction in 94 

Scholarships: 

In the College 39 and 132-144 

In the School of Theology 39 and 144-151 

School of Theology, Description of 99-116 

Science and Mathematics, Summer Institute 126-130 

Senate, University 30 

Sewanee Military Academy Alumni Association, Officers of 186 

Sewanee Review 39 

Spanish, Instruction in 95 

Special Students 48 and loi 

St. Luke's Alumni Asscyciation, Officers of 186 

St. Luke's Journal 1 16 

St. Luke's Society 116 



INDEX 197 

PAGE 

Student Aid 131-ISI 

Student Union 13-14 

Summary of the Enrollment 178 

Summer Institute 126-130 

Suspension, Academic SO 

Theology, Instruction in 114-117 

Transfer Credits 46-47 

Trustees, Board of 184-185 

Tuition 36-39 

Vaccination 35 

Year, Academic 47 




of fbe Souih 



T 



SEWANEE, TENNESSEE 



Announcements i 
For 1965^ i 



CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 

Inquiries should be addressed as follows: 

The Director of Admissions. 

Admission to the College; scholarships and financial aid; 
catalogues. 

The Dean of the School of Theology. 

All matters pertaining to the School of Theology, including 
admission of students, scholarships, housing, curriculum, and 
faculty appointments. 

The Dean of the College. 

Academic regulations; curriculum; faculty appointments. 

The Dean of Men. 

Student counseling; class attendance; student conduct; stu- 
dent housing; military service; placement of graduates. 

The Registrar. 

Transcripts and academic records. 

The Treasurer. 

Payment of bills. 

The Alumni Director. 

Alumni Associations; Public Relations; History of the Uni- 
versity. 

The Provost. 

Financial matters; physical equipment; employment of per- 
sonnel; medals and prizes. 

The Vice-Chancellor. 

General Administrative Affairs. 



The Bulletin of the University of the South, Volume 58, 1964, Number 3. This 
Bulletin is published quarterly in February, May, August, and November by 
The University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. Second-class postage paid at 
Sewanee, Tenn. 



opuUetin of 



The University of the South 



Annual Catalogue 1964-65 




Announcements for Session of 1965-66 



The University of the South is located at Sewanee, Ten- 
nessee, two thousand feet above sea level, on a ten-thousand- 
acre campus on the Cumberland Plateau. 

The enrollment in the College of Arts and Sciences is strictly 
limited, thus enabling the College to provide small classes and 
an intimate, personal relation between student and professor. 

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Forestry de- 
grees are granted by the College. Courses are oifered which 
provide basic training for business, for forestry, and for ad- 
vanced work in numerous fields. Including journalism, law, 
medicine, teaching, and theology. 

The University of the South is a charter member of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Credits from 
the University are accepted by all institutions of higher learning 
in this country and abroad. 

The Honor Code is a cherished tradition among students 
and faculty. There is a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa in the 
University, among other honor and service fraternities. Eleven 
national social fraternities maintain chapters at Sewanee. 

The University has a nationally known program of non-sub- 
sidized athletics. Varsity sports Include football, cross country, 
basketball, baseball, golf, tennis, swimming, wrestling, and 
track, in addition to an organized intramural program in these 
and other sports. The University Choir provides training in 
music. Work in dramatics Is carried on, with productions 
throughout the year. Students publish a school paper, a year- 
book, a handbook, and a literary magazine. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Calendar 4-6 

The University — History and Objectives 7-1 1 

University Domain and Buildings 12-16 

Officers of Instruction 17-24 

Officers of Administration 25-29 

University Standing Committees 30 

University Senate 31 

General Information 32-41 

College of Arts and Sciences 43-108 

School of Theology 109-133 

Summer Institute of Science and Mathematics 135-140 

Scholarships: College of Arts and Sciences 142-154 

Scholarships: School of Theology 154-161 

Medals and Prizes 162-163 

Register of Students 165-195 

Board of Regents 196 

Board of Trustees 197-198 

Associated Alumni I99 

Commencement, 1964 200-206 

Index 207-211 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1965-66 



College of Arts and Sciences 

Summer Term 
196s 

June 20, Sunday Dormitories open. 

June 21, Monday Registration 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. 

June 22, Tuesday Qasses meet at 8:00 a.m. 

July 16, Friday Holiday. 

August II, Wednesday Last day of classes. 

August 12, Thursday Summer School examinations begin. 

August 14, Saturday Summer School examinations end. 

First Semester 

September 12, Sunday Orientation program for new students begins at 

6:30 p.m. 

Dining hall open for students at evening meal. 
September 14, Tuesday Registration of new students 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. 

Registration of old students 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. 
September 15, Wednesday Registration of old students 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. 

Opening Convocation at 12:10 p.m. 

September 16, Thursday Classes meet at 8:00 a.m. 

October 10, Sunday Founders' Day. 

November 6, Saturday Homecoming Holiday. 

November 24, Wednesday Thanksgiving recess begins at noon. 

November 29, Monday Thanksgiving recess ends. Qasses meet at 8:00 ajn. 

December 17, Friday Christmas Holidays begin at noon. 

1966 

January 4, Tuesday Christmas Holidays end. Classes meet at 8:00 ajn. 

January 20, Thursday First semester examinations begin. 

January 29, Saturday First semester examinations end. 

Second Semester 

February i, Tuesday Registration of first year students for the second se- 
mester 8:00 to 10:30 a.m. Registration of old stu- 
dents for the second semester 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

February 2, Wednesday Classes meet at 8:00 a.m. 

February 23, Wednesday Ash Wednesday, Chapel Service. 

March 19, Saturday Spring recess begins at noon. 

March 29, Tuesday Spring recess ends. Classes meet at 8:00 a.m. 

April 8, Friday Good Friday. 

April 10, Sunday Easter Day. 

May 23, Monday Second semester examinations begin. 

June I, Wednesday Second semester examinations end. 

June S, Sunday Commencement Day. 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

19 6 5 — 1966 



School of Theology 

Summer, 1965 
July 14 — ^August 18 Graduate School of Theology. 

First Semester 

19^5 

August 25, Wednesday Dormitory open for new students. 

August 26, Thursday Greek Program for new students. 

September 13, Monday Registration of all theological students, 

9:00-12:00. Orientation program 
for new students begins in afternoon. 

September 14, Tuesday Begin two day toUoquium for all stu- 
dents and wives. 

September 15, Wednesday Opening Convocation of University at 

12:10. 

September 16, Thursday Regular Classes begin. 

October 10, Sunday Founders' Day. 

October 19, Tuesday St. Luke's Day Celebration, and 

October 20, Wednesday DuBose Lectures. 

November 6, Saturday University Homecoming Holiday. 

November 24, Wednesday Thanksgiving recess begins at noon. 

November 29, Monday Thanksgiving recess ends. Classes re- 
sume. 

December 17, Friday Christmas Holidays begin at noon. 

1966 

January 4, Tuesday Christmas Holidays end. Classes resume. 

January 13, Thursday Reading Period begins. 

January 20, Thursday First semester examinations begin. 

January 26, Wednesday First semester examinations end. 

Second Semester 

January 31, Monday Registration of all theological students, 

9:00-12:00. 

February i, Tuesday Classes begin. 

February 23, Wednesday Ash Wednesday Quiet Day. 

March ^^ Saturday Spring recess begins. 

March 2-9,^ Tuesday Spring recess ends. Classes resume. 

April (date to be announced) Samuel Marshall Beattie Lectures. 

April 8, Friday Good Friday. 

April 10, Sunday Easter Day. 

May 14, Saturday Reading Period begins. 

May 21, Saturday Second semester examinations begin. 

May 27, Friday Second semester examinations end. 

June 5, Sunday Commencement Day. 

Summer, 1966 
July 13 — ^August 17 Graduate School of Theology. 



Calendar for 1965 




JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 




S M T W T F S 

I 2 

3456789 
10 II 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 a8 29 30 
31 


S M T W T F S 
.. 123456 
7 8 9 10 II 12 13 
14 IS 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 


S M T W T F S 
.. 123456 
7 8 9 10 u 12 13 
14 IS 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 34 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 

I a 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
II 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 




MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 




S M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F S 
.... I 2 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 II 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 

I 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 lo 
II 12 13 14 IS 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
1234567 
8 9 10 II 12 13 14 
IS 16 17 18 1920 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
293031 




2345678 

9 10 n 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 




SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 




S M T W T F S 
...... I 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 II 
12 13 14 IS 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 . . . . 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 
.. 123456 
7 8 9 10 II 12 13 
14 IS 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 
...... I 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 II 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 




3456789 
10 II 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
9 1 . . . . 




- 




Calendar for 1966 




JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 




S M T W T F S 

I 


S M T W T F S 

.... 12345 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 to 

20 2t 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 


S M T W T F 8 

... I 234s 
6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 2S 26 

27 28 2g 30 31 • • • • 


S M T W T F S 

I 2 




2345678 
9 10 II 12 13 14 It; 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 2Q 
30 31 


3456789 
10 II 12 13 14 IS 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 2S 26 27 28 29 30 








MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 




S M T W T F S 

1234567 
8 9 10 II 12 13 14 
IS 16 17 18 iQ 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 3031 


S M T W T F S 

1234 

5 6 7 8 9 10 II 
12 13 14 !<; 16 17 18 

IQ 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 ... 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 

I 23456 

7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 




3456780 

10 I I 12 13 14 IS 16 

17 18 IQ 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 2Q -?0 
31 




SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 




S M T W T F S 

I 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 ic 
II 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 IQ 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 . 


S M T W T F 8 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 5^ 
9 10 I I 12 13 14 iq 

16 17 18 IQ 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


S M T W T F S 

... 12345 
6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 
13 14 J5 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 

I 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 !o 

M 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 IQ 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 ^I 






THE UNIVERSITY 



HISTORY AND OBJECTIVES 



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH is a Christian institution, 
with a clearly discerned philosophy of Christian education, 
owned by twenty-one dioceses of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church. It has no religious restrictions but presumes the disposition 
of all members of its community to live within the spirit of its con- 
trolling concepts. Young men of all denominations are enrolled in the 
student body. 

The idea of The University of the South was born in a mani- 
festo signed and published by nine Southern bishops attending the 
General Convention of the Episcopal Church In Philadelphia in 1856. 
The leader in the movement was Bishop Leonldas Polk of Louisiana. 
This declaration was an invitation and an appeal to the Church in the 
South to take steps to found an Institution of higher learning because, 
in the thought of the bishops' letter, "the establishing of a Christian 
University by our Church is a compelling necessity, for intelligence 
and moral sentiment are the support of government." 

In response to the call of the Philadelphia message, the bishops and 
the duly elected clergy and laymen of their several dioceses assembled 
on Lookout Mountain In Tennessee on July 4, 1857, the date of the 
founding of The University of the South as recorded in its his- 
tory. This assembly, which was actually a meeting of Trustees, deter- 
mined by formal resolution to establish a University. The Trustees 
launched plans for the great undertaking, appointed committees to 
carry on the preliminary work, and adjourned to gather again in the 
fall. 

According to agreement, the Trustees met in Montgomery, Alabama, 
on November 25, 1857. Here they named the institution which they 



8 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

were to build "The University of the South" and selected Sewa- 
nee, Tennessee, on a plateau in the Cumberland Mountains, as the 
site and home of the proposed University. And since that time The 
University of the South has been popularly known as "Sewanee". 

At historic Beersheba Springs, thirty miles north of Sewanee, the 
Trustees assembled for the third time on July 3, 1858. The chairter 
of the University, granted by the Legislature of Tennessee on Janu- 
ary 6 of the same year, was presented to the Board of Trustees. 
Further plans were made to open the University as soon as possible. 

The cornerstone of The University of the South was laid on Oc- 
tober 10, i860. A great concourse of people gathered in the forest 
on the Mountain top for the impressive and significant ceremony. The 
whole scene was the romantic reality of a magnificent vision come 
true. Bishop Elliott of Georgia placed first in the cornerstone a copy 
of the Bible and then a copy of the Book of Common Prayer. 

Bishop Leonidas Polk of Louisiana formally laid the stone, speak- 
ing these words: "I, Leonidas Polk, D.D., Bishop of Louisiana, on 
this tenth day of October, In the year of grace one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty, do lay this cornerstone of an edifice to be here 
erected as the principal building of The University of the South, 
an Institution established for the cultivation of true religion, learning, 
and virtue, that thereby God may be glorified and the happiness of 
man may be advanced." The Honorable John S. Preston of South 
Carolina delivered the oration. Among the many fine statements in 
his splendid address this sentence challenges the attention of men to- 
day as It did at that time: "Unless we are taught to use them in the 
right way, civil and religious liberties are worthless and dangerous 
boons." 

Then came the Civil War. The conflict which raged for four years 
put an end temporarily to all plans to build the University. After 
the War came reconstruction. It appeared that the concept of a great 
Christian university might be lost in the struggle of contending armies 
and in the chaos and uncertainty that followed upon the heels of 
battle. 

But the dream lived on in the hearts and minds of men. After the 
strife was over and as the South began Its valiant effort to rebuild it- 
self, men's thoughts turned again to the undertaking which had fired 
their imagination. With heroism and renewed confidence the Church, 
under the leadership of Bishop Quintard of Tennessee, picked up the 



HISTORY AND OBJECTIVES 9 

threads that had been broken by the clash of arms and knit them to- 
gether again. 

In 1868 on September i8 The University of the South was 
opened, with an enrollment of nine students for its first session. There 
were only three frame buildings: St. Augustine's Chapel, Otey Hall, 
and Cobbs Hall. But that was enough. Courage had triumphed. 
The University envisioned by the bishops in Philadelphia had been 
established. Since that time ninety-seven years have passed, years of 
toil and sacrifice on the part of a host of men and women loyal and de- 
voted to Sewanee and her mission, years of victory and defeat, of 
hope and disappointment, years of an abiding and steadfast faith not 
to be denied. The handful of students has grown. Buildings have 
been erected one by one. The University of the South is now com- 
posed of a College of Liberal Arts accommodating approximately eight 
hundred students, and a Theological School of eighty students. Apart 
from and near the University campus and governed by the same 
Board of Trustees is the Sewanee Military Academy, an excellent 
preparatory school of some two hundred and seventy-five boys. 

The first frame buildings of the early period have gone. Beautiful 
stone buildings have taken their place, all constructed of stone from 
the Mountain on which they stand. 

The Campus of the University is one of the loveliest in America, 
with its winding walks, green grass, and majestic oaks. Close by is 
the Mountain's edge with enchanting views of the valley below. 

Here conditions are almost ideal for the pursuit of learning, for 
growth of mind and spirit, for enrichment of personality, for develop- 
ment of nobility of character. 

Just as the establishing of a great Christian university in 1856 was 
a compelling necessity, the strength and permanence of The Univer- 
sity OF the South for the present and the future are also a compel- 
ling necessity. In this day as in that of the inception of Sewanee, in- 
telligence and moral sentiment are the support of government and 
society. In a society of free pepole there must be intelligence — en- 
lightened minds disciplined to wisdom — in order that the people may 
govern themselves securely and justly; there must be moral sanity and 
understanding in order that the people may possess that righteousness 
which "exalteth a nation." 

Both intelligence and morality are necessary because the mind 
without the control and motivation of spiritual ideals is a negative or 



10 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

a destructive agency, and because spiritual idealism without intelli- 
gence Is weak and futile. 

The aim and purpose of the University are clearly set forth in the 
following statement formulated by the University Senate: 

"We are definitely committed at Sewanee to the College of Liberal 
Arts as a distinct unit In the educational system of our country, with 
a contribution to make that can be made by no other agency. In an 
age when the demand for the immediately practical Is so insistent, 
when the Integrity of the College of Liberal Arts Is imperiled by the 
demands of vocational training, we adhere to the basic function of the 
College of Liberal Arts: the training of youth in Christian virtue, in 
personal initiative, in self-mastery, in social consciousness. In aesthetic 
appreciation, in intellectual integrity, and in scientific methods of 
inquiry. 

"This function can best be performed in a small college through the 
medium of a faculty of character and distinction maintaining intimate 
personal contact with a carefully selected group of students. 

"As a further means, the curriculum of the College of Liberal Arts 
should not only be of a definite character but seek consistently and 
positively the correlation of the various branches of knowledge by re- 
ferring them to a fundamental principle in the light of which can be 
seen mathematics and physics reaching up through philosophy to the 
knowledge of God; biology, chemistry, and geology as a progressive 
revelation of the creative force in the universe; and economics, soci- 
ology, and political science looking forward to the realization of the 
Christian Ideal of human society founded on the Brotherhood of Man 
and the Fatherhood of God. 

"The well-rounded curriculum recognizes the importance of ancient 
languages and literature and conserves thereby the best that there is 
In the past of the race; It gives a position of emphasis to the study 
of the English language and literature, together with a training in ora- 
tory and debate, as necessary to a proper appreciation of our Anglo- 
Saxon traditions; it gives due recognition to pure science, the social 
sciences, and history as indispensable instruments for maintaining an 
intelligent contact with contemporary life and civilization; it Includes 
modern languages and literature as the surest means to a true under- 
standing of the manners and institutions of those nations who share 
with us the burdens of human progress; It looks to the study of phi- 
losophy as the agency which synthesizes and unifies all departments 
of human endeavor. The educational program of the College of Lib- 



HISTORY AND OBJECTIVES II 

eral Arts requires the recognition of the sanctity of the human body 
and the necessity for its development in wholesome and well-regulated 
athletics. 

"Furthermore, inasmuch as religious faith is the essential basis of 
right conduct and as that faith is best cultivated through the aid of 
Divine Revelation, The University of the South regards as indis- 
pensable to the realization of its ideals of cultured and useful man- 
hood systematic courses of instruction in the Bible. Finally, as there 
is no true progress without a goal, The University of the South 
states this to be the end objective of its effort in any and all of 
its departments: the realization of the Kingdom of God, which is the 
kingdom of love, as interpreted in the life and teaching of Jesus Christ. 

"The School of Theology is a constituent unit in The University of 
THE South. It is an inevitable result of the idea of Christian education 
in the minds of the Founders. Its purpose is to train godly men to 
become able and worthy ministers of Christ as pastors and priests, 
prophets and teachers in His Church. Separated from the College by 
only the width of a road, it has its own faculty, its own curriculum, its 
own dormitories and student organizations, its own Chapel, and regular 
round of Church services; yet it is integrated socially and intellectually 
into the life of the University Community. It has access to any courses 
offered in the College of Arts and Sciences which constitute appropriate 
extensions or supplements to its curriculum. It shares all public lec- 
tures, concerts, plays, and art exhibitions, and has the full benefit of 
the general University Library and the Emerald-Hodgson Hospital. 
Thus it seeks to combine the advantages of concentration on a single 
common purpose and of contact with people of other vocations and 
mental disciplines so 'that the man of God may be full grown, thor- 
oughly furnished unto all good works.' 

"It welcomes to its lovely Mountain home men with a sincere sense 
of vocation to know Christ and make Him known, and offers to them 
the guidance, friendship, and instruction of godly and experienced 
teachers in the Doctrine, Discipline, and Worship of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church." 















UNIVERSITY DOMAIN AND BUILDINGS 




EWANEE, the site of The University of the South, is lo- 
cated on the Cumberland Plateau about midway between 
Nashville and Chattanooga, Tennessee, on a branch of the 
Louisville and Nashville Railroad. U. S. Highway No. 64 from Mem- 
phis and the west to Chattanooga and the south and east passes 
through Sewanee. U. S. Highway No. 41-A from Chicago to Florida 
alsO' passes through Sewanee and connects with Highway No. 41 at 
Monteagle, Tennessee, about five miles northeast of Sewanee. 

Railroad tickets may be bought to Cowan, Tennessee, six miles away 
from Sewanee. Taxi transportation from Cowan to the University's 
campus is available. 

Bus riders may buy tickets either to Sewanee or to Monteagle, five 
miles away, from which taxi service Is available. Plane tickets can be 
bought to Chattanooga or Nashville, with air-taxi or bus service from 
those points. 

Sewanee has telegraph service, express and money order faclhties, 
a local bank, and stores In the village as well as the University's store 
on the campus. 

The Domain of The University of the South comprises ten thou- 
sand acres of land in the Cumberland Mountains at Sewanee, Ten- 
nessee, two thousand feet above sea level. Such an extensive Domain, 
completely under the ownership and control of the University, provides 
a rare location for a campus and affords unusual facilities for recreation 
and athletic sport of all sorts. The climate is healthful and invigorating. 

The Domain is beautiful in itself and, reaching in many places to 
the Mountain's edge, presents beautiful scenes oi mountains, hills, and 
valleys. 

All permanent buildings of the University are built of sandstone 



THE UNIVERSITY DOMAIN AND BUILDINGS I3 

found Upon the University's Domain. In the following paragraphs, 
a brief description of each building is given. 

The Emerald-Hodgson Hospital. The Hodgson Memorial In- 
firmary, the first stone building for University use, was erected in 
1877. This building, the gift of the Rev. Telfair Hodgson, D.D., and 
Mrs. Hodgson, in memory of a daughter, was intended for a library 
but, owing to changes in the general plan for University buildings, 
was found to be too' far from the central group. In 1899 this beauti- 
ful structure was enlarged and converted into a hospital, with wards 
for both free and paying patients. In 1908 another addition was built, 
containing a well-equipped operating room. On February 10, 191 1, 
this hospital, with the exception of the 1908 addition, was destroyed 
by fire. Liberal contributions made it possible to rebuild on a larger 
scale in 19 12. The new building, which is equipped in conformity 
with modern requirements, is known as the Emerald-Hodgson Hos- 
pital. 

During 1950 the University constructed a pediatric wing with funds 
made available by the generosity of the Lilly Endowment, Inc., of 
Indianapolis, and by the untiring efforts of Dr. Oscar N. Torian. 

In 195 1 the University constructed a new nutses' home, the Frank 
P. PhiUips Memorial Nurses' Home, and renovated the old nurses' 
home as an out-patient clinic. Funds for this construction were con- 
tributed by the Federal and State Governments and by Mrs. Frank P. 
Phillips of Columbus, Mississippi, in memory of her husband. 

St. Luke's Memorial Hall, the gift of Mrs. Charlotte Morris 
Manigault, of South Carolina, in memory of Mr. Lewis Morris, her 
father, was built in 1878 for the use of the School of Theology. In 
195 1 a wing was added, and in 1956-57 the entire building was reno- 
vated. St. Luke's Hall now contains lecture and seminar rooms, faculty 
and administrative offices, the Grosvenor Auditorium, the Library with 
five floors of stacks, a student and faculty lounge, and dormitory rooms 
for forty-six unmarried students. 

St. Luke's Memorial Chapel, the gift of the late Mrs. Telfair 
Hodgson, as a memorial to her husband, the Rev. Telfair Hodgson, 
D.D., at one time Vice-Chancellor of the University and Dean of the 
Theological School, stands a short distance to the south of St. Luke's 
Hall. 

Thompson Hall, named for the Hon. Jacob Thompson, of Miss- 
issippi, was erected in 1883 and enlarged in 1901. Mrs. James L. 



14 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Houghteling of Chicago generously provided for the remodeling of 
this buiding as a memorial to her late husband. This building was 
destroyed by fire in March, 1950. It has been rebuilt and contains the 
student union, sandwich shop, post office, and theatre. 

Convocation Hall is one of the most beautiful buildings of the 
University. From 1901 to 1965, it was used as a library. The tower 
that forms the entrance is called Breslin Tower, the funds for its erec- 
tion having been donated by Thomas and Elizabeth Breslin in memory 
of their daughter Lucy. It is modeled after the tower of the Magdalen 
College Chapel, Oxford, and rises to the height of a hundred feet. In 
1900, the Rev. George William Douglas of Tuxedo, New York, placed 
in the tower a clock and Westminster Chimes in memory of his mother, 
Mrs. Charlotte Ferris Douglas. 

Walsh-Ellett Hall contains administrative offices and classrooms 
of the College of Arts and Sciences. Originally this building was the 
gift of the late Vincent D. Walsh of Louisiana as a memorial to 
his daughter, Susan Jessie, and erected in 1890. The renovation of 
this building, completed in 1959, was the gift of the late Dr. Edward 
Coleman Ellett, an alumnus of this University. 

Palmetto, a frame building, is the headquarters of the Air Force 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps. 

Dormitories. Students of the University are housed in modern fire- 
proof dormitories. These buildings, which are centrally located and 
contain matron's quarters, students' common room, and accommoda- 
tions for 40 to 100 students each, are: Hoffman Hall (built 192 1), 
Elliott Hall (formerly Sewanee Inn, built 1922), Cannon Hall (built 
1925), Johnson Hall (built 1926), Tuckaway Inn (built 1930), Gailor 
Hall (built 1952), Hunter Hall (built 1953), Sessums Cleveland Hall 
(built 1955), Benedict Hall (built 1963), and McCrady Hall (built 
1964). The lower floor of Tuckaway Inn is used for the classrooms 
and studios of the Department of Fine Arts and for the Art Gallery. 
Gailor Memorial Hall contains a dining room for 700 students and 
dormitory space for 80 students. In 1946 the University erected 
frame buildings to provide for increased enrollment. These are Barton 
Hall, Selden Hall, and the Woodland Apartments for married students. 

Sev^anee Inn, the gift of a few alumni and friends, was opened in 
1958 for the accommodation of visitors. Claramont Restaurant ad- 
joins the motel-type Inn. 

The Frank A. Juhan Gymnasium, completed in the fall of 1957, 



THE UNIVERSITY DOMAIN AND BUILDINGS I5 

has the following facilities: a basketball arena seating 1,500 spectators, 
shower facilities for home team and visitors, a swimming pool con- 
forming to N.C.A.A. standards with adjoining shower rooms, a rifle 
range, bowling alleys, a visiting team dormitory, an intramural gym- 
nasium floor for basketball, volleyball, and badminton, dressing rooms 
for physical education and intramural athletics, two handball courts, 
dressing rooms and showers for the football team, a training room, a 
wrestling room, a gymnastics room, coaches' offices, and a trophy room. 
The Eugene O. Harris Memorial Stadium was built on Hardee Field 
in 1957. 

All Saints' Chapel. The financial panic of 1907 arrested the build- 
ing of All Saints' Chapel, but even in its incomplete form it was for 
half a century the spiritual center of the University. This magnificent 
Church in collegiate Gothic style is now completed. 

The campanile, which is 143 feet high, is known as Shapard Tower 
and is the gift of the Robert P. Shapard family of Griffin, Georgia. The 
tower contains one of the world's best and largest carillons, given by 
W. Dudley Gale of Nashville, Tennessee, in honor of his great grand- 
father. Bishop Leonidas Polk of Louisiana, one of the founders of the 
University. 

GuERRY Hall. This building provides auditorium, art gallery, class- 
room, and office facilities. The building honors the late Dr. Alexander 
Guerry, a member of the class of 1910, of Sewanee and Chattanooga, 
the University's Vice-Chancellor from 1938 until his death in 1948. It 
was completed in the summer of 196 1. 

The Carnegie Science Hall, the gift of Mr. Andrew Carnegie, is 
a handsome sandstone building providing accommodations for the de- 
partments of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. 

In April of 1940, upon the successful completion of the campaign 
for a Sustaining Fund of ^500,000, the General Education Board of 
New York made a grant of $25,000 for the renovation of the in- 
terior of Science Hall, for furniture for the building, and for the pur- 
chase of laboratory apparatus and material. The expenditure of this 
sum has given The University of the South exceptionally fine ac- 
commodations and equipment for instruction and study in the field of 
the natural sciences. 

The six-inch telescope given to the University in 191 3 by Mrs. J. L. 
Harris of New Orleans is installed in a well constructed observatory, 
the erection of which was made possible by the generosity of the 
General Education Board. 



l6 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

In 1957 the College, through its departments of Biology, Chemistry, 
and Physics, constructed a Radioactive Isotopes Laboratory. This 
laboratory contains the latest equipment necessary for instructional 
and research use of radioactive material. 

The Snowden Forestry Building, built in 1962, contains 10,000 
square feet of floor space. Adequate offices, classrooms, and labora- 
tories with adjoining greenhouse offer the Sewanee forestry student 
the newest and best facihties in the South. The rooms in the two-story 
stone structure are paneled in different woods and present a working 
laboratory for the student. In this building is displayed a collection 
of 8,600 different wood species. Over 300 gavels, each made from a 
different wood, complete the wood technology collection. 

The Charlotte Guerry Tennis Courts Building, built in 1964 
from gifts of members and friends of the Guerry family, contains three 
excellent tennis courts that may be used throughout the year. 

The Jessie Ball duPont Library, completed in 1965, is named in 
honor of Mrs. Alfred I. duPont of Wilmington, Delaware. In keeping 
with other buildings on the campus, it is constructed of local sandstone 
in the collegiate Gothic style of architecture. 

In addition to these public buildings, the University also owns a 
number of residences for accommodation of its officers and faculty. 






OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION I7 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

EDWARD McCRADY 

BA., LL.D., College of Charleston; M.S., University of Pittsburgh; 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; LL.D., University of Chattanooga; 

ScD., Southwestern at Memphis; L.H.D,, Concord College 

Vic^-Chancellor 

GASTON SWINDELL BRUTON 

BA., MA., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Provost and Professor of Mathematics 

The Very Rev. GEORGE MOYER ALEXANDER 

B.A., B.D., S.T.M., The University of the South; 

D.D., Virginia Theological Seminary; 

S.T.D., Seabury-Western Theological Seminary 

Dean of the School of Theology 

♦ROBERT SAMUEL LANCASTER 

B.A., Hampden-Sydney; M.A., The University of the South; 

Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and 

Professor of Political Science 

JOHN MAURICE WEBB 

B.A., Duke University; M.A., Yale University; Ph.D., Duke University 

Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and 

Francis S. Houghteling Professor of American History 



GEORGE MERRICK BAKER 

B.A., Ph.D., Yale Universty; D.Litt., The University of the South 

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Emeritus, and 

Professor of Germanic Languages, Emeritus 

WILLIAM WATERS LEWIS 

C.E., The University of the South 

Professor of Spanish, Emeritus, and 

Secretary of the University Senate, Emeritus 

EUGENE MARK KAYDEN 

BA., University of Colorado; MA., Harvard University 

Professor of Economics, Emeritus 

PAUL SCOFIELD McCONNELL 

BA., University of Southern California; A.M., Princeton University; AAGO 

Professor of Music, Emeritus, and University Organist, Emeritus 



*0n leave 1964-1965. 



1 8 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The Rev. VESPER OTTMER WARD 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan; S.T.B., Boston University School of Theology; 

S.T.M., ST.D., Seabury-Western; D.D., Ohio Wesleyan 

Professor of Christian Education and Homiletics, Emeritus 

ROBERT LOWELL PETRY 

B.A., Earlham College; B.S., Haverford College; Ph.D., Princeton University 

Professor of Physics, Emeritus 



*JOHN SEDBERRY MARSHALL 

B.A., Pomona College; Ph.D., Boston University 

Professor of Philosophy 

ARTHUR BUTLER DUGAN 

A.B., A.M., Princeton University; B.Litt., Oxford University; 

Diploma in Economics and Political Science, Oxford University 

Professor of Political Science 

CHARLES TRAWICK HARRISON 

A.B., University of Alabama; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

/esse Spalding Professor of English Literature 

STRATTON BUCK 

A.B., University of Michigan; A.M., Columbia University; 

Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Professor of French 

CHARLES EDWARD CHESTON 

B.S., Syracuse University; M.F., Yale School of Forestry 

Annie B. Snowden Professor of Forestry 

JAMES EDWARD THOROGOOD 

B.A., MA., The University of the South; Ph.D., University of Texas 

Professor of Economics 

JAMES MILLER GRIMES 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Professor of History 

HOWARD MALCOLM OWEN 

B.A., Hampden-Sydney; MA., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Professor of Biology 

FREDERICK RHODES WHITESELL 
A.B., A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of California 
Professor of German 



*0n leave first semester 1964-1965. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION I9 

MAURICE AUGUSTUS MOORE, III 

B.S., The University of the South; M-iA., Ph.D., University of North Carolma 

Professor of English 

ADRIAN TIMOTHY PICKERING 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Professor of Spanish 

DAVID BENNETT CAMP 

B.S., The College of William and Mary; Ph.D., University of Rochester 

F. B. Williams Professor of Chemistry 

BAYLY TURLINGTON 

B.A., The University of the South; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 
Professor of Classical Languages and 
Marshal of the University Facilities 

HARRY CLAY YEATMAN 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Professor of Biology 

The Rev. JOHN HOWARD WINSLOW RHYS 

B.A., McGill University; L.Th., Montreal Diocesan Theological College; 

ST.B., S.T.M., Th.D., General Theological Seminary 

Professor of New Testament 

Major FRANK RAYMOND MURRAY 

B.A., College of St. Joseph; M.S., University of Colorado 
Professor of Air Science 

ANDREW NELSON LYTLE 

B.A., Vanderbilt University 

Lecturer in English and Editor of The Sewanee Review 

ABBOTT GOTTEN MARTIN 

B.A., MA., University of Mississippi 

Associate Professor of English 

ROBERT ARTHUR DEGEN 

B.S., M.A., Syracuse University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Associate Professor of Economics 

GILBERT FRANK GILCHRIST 

B.A., The University of the South; M.A., Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

The Rev. DAVID BROWNING COLLINS 

BA., B.D., S.T.M., The University of the South 

Diploma with credit, St. Augustine's College, Canterbury 

Associate Professor of Religion and Chaplain of the University 



20 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

♦ALFRED SCOTT BATES 

B.A., Carletx)n College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Associate Professor of French 

The Rev. CHARLES LAYFAETTE WINTERS, Jr. 

BA., Brown University; B.D., Virginia Theological Seminary; 

S.T.M., Unicfli Theological Seminary; Th.D., General Theological Seminary 

Associate Professor of Dogmatic Theology 

WILLIAM BENTON GUENTHER 

A.B., Oberlin College; M.S., PhX)., The University of Rochester 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

The Rev. JAMES WILLIAM BRETTMANN 

B.S., B.D., The University of the South; BXitt., Oxford University 

Associate Professor of Religion and Assistant Chaplain 

tHUGH HARRIS CALDWELL, Jr. 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; M.S., Emory University 

PhJD., University of Virginia 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

The Rev. CHRISTOPHER FITZSIMONS ALLISON 

B.S., The University of the South; M.S., M.A., PhD., Yale University 

DPhil., Oxford University 

Associate Professor of Ecclesiastical History 

♦STEPHEN ELLIOTT PUCKETTE 

B.S., The University of the South; M.S., M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 

HENRY WILDS SMITH, Jr. 

B.A., Dartmouth; Mj.F., D.For., Yale University 

Associate Professor of Forestry 

BRINLEY JOHN RHYS 

B.A., George Peabody College for Teachers; M.A., Vanderbilt University; 

Ph.D., Tulane University 

Associate Professor of English 

CHARLES O'CONNOR BAIRD 

B.S., University of Tennessee; M.F., Yale University; D.F., Duke University 

Acting Dean of Men, Associate Professor of Forestry, and 

Director of the Summer School 



*On leave 1964-1965. 

tOn leave second semester 1 964-1 965. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 21 

MARVIN ELIAS GOODSTEIN 

b.S.^ New York University; Ph.D., Cornell University 

Associate Professor of Economics 

JAMES THOMAS CROSS 

A.B., Brown University; M.S., Harvard University; Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

SAMUEL ALEXANDER McLEOD 

B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

WILLIAM THEODORE ALLEN 

B.A., Oberlin College; M.S., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Associate Professor of Physics 

The Rev. JOHN MAURICE GESSELL 

B.A., B.D, Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professor of Pastoral Theology and 

Assistant to the Dean of the School of Theology 

CHARLES WILLIAM FOREMAN 

BA., University of North Carolina; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University 

Associate Professor of Biology 

G. PHILIP JOHNSON 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

ROBERT WILLIAM LUNDIN 

A.B., De Pauw University; A.M., Ph.D., Indiana University 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

PAUL RAMSEY 

B.A., Mj\., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

Associate Professor of English 

HARRY STANFORD BARRETT 

Art Students' League; Beaux Arts Academy; University of London, Slade School; 

Heatherley's, London; Julian's Academy, Paris; La Grande Chaumiere, Paris; 

Atelier of Fernand Leger, Paris; Art Center School, Los Angeles 

Artist in Residence 

DOUGLAS LOUGHMILLER VAUGHAN, Jr. 

B.S., The University of the South 

Lecturer in Economics 

THADDEUS CONSTANTINE LOCKARD, Jr. 

B.A., University of Mississippi; M.A., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor of German 



22 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The Rev. GRANVILLE CECIL WOODS, Jr. 

B.A., Vanderbilt University; B.D., Virginia Theological Seminary; 

S.T.M., Yale Divinity School 

Assistant Professor of Liturgies and Patristics 

THOMAS FELDER DORN 

B.S., Duke University; Ph.D., University of Washington 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

GEORGE SHUFORD RAMSEUR 

B.A,, Elon College; M.Ed., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

*The Rev. WILLIAM AUGUSTIN GRIFFIN 
B.A., Duke University; B.D., M.A., Yale University 
! Assistant Professor of Old Testament Language and Interpretation 

Major WILLIAM FRANCIS CAMPBELL 

B.S., Montclair State College 

Assistant Professor of Air Science 

WILLIAM BRUNER CAMPBELL 

B.S., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas 

Assistant Professor of History 

Captain J. H. ALLEN KEPLEY 

B.S., Western Kentucky State Teachers College 

Assistant Professor of Air Science 

MARTHA McCRORY 

B.M., University of Michigan; M.M., University of Rochester 

Assistant Professor of Music 

The Rev. WILLIAM HENRY RALSTON, Jr. 

BA.., The University of the South; S.T.B., S.T.M., General Theological Seminary 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy of Religion and Ethics 

ROBERT LARRY KEELE 

B.A., The University of the South; M.A., Ph.D., Emory University 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

KENNETH RUDGE WILSON JONES 

B.A., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Assistant Professor of French 

JOSEPH MARTIN RUNNING 

B.Mus., St. Olaf College 

Assistant Professor of Music and University Organist 



*0n leave first semester 1964-1965. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 23 

DONALD BOWIE WEBBER 

B.S., U. S. Military Academy; M.A., Duke University 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 

The Rev. HENRY LEE HOBART MYERS 

B.A., The University of the South; S.T.B., General Theological Seminary 

Assistant Professor of Pastoral Theology 

♦CHARLES MATHEWS BINNICKER, Jr. 

BA., Tne University of the South; M.A., Florida State University 

Instructor in Classical Languages 

IRA BOLGER READ 

B,A., Mllligan College; M.A., Emory University 

Instructor in History 

*ERIC WOODFIN NAYLOR 

B.A., The University of the South; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Instructor in Spanish 

ANITA SHAFER GOODSTEIN 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Instructor in History 

HENRY FRANK ARNOLD, Jr. 

B.A., The University of the South; M.A., Harvard University 

Instructor in English 

SAMUEL BURWELL BARNETT CARLETON 

B.A., The University of the South; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University 
Instructor in Classical Languages 

RICHARD JOHNSTONE CORBIN 

B.A., The University of the South; M.A., Tulane University 

Instructor in English 

LAURENCE RICHARD ALVAREZ 

B.A., The University of the South; M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 

Instructor in Mathematics 

ERIC HANS ELLIS 

B.S., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Instructor in Physics 

DAVID CHANG LING 

B.A., University of Oregon; MA.., University of Wisconsin 

Instructor in Spanish and French 



*0n leave 1964-1965. 



24 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

JAMES WARING McCRADY 

B,A., The University of the South; MA., University of North Carolina 

Instructor in French 

GREGORY RUST McNAB, Jr. 

B.A., Washington and Lee University 

Instructor in Spanish 

JOHN EDWIN RUSH, Jr. 

A.B., Birmingham-Southern College; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 

Instructor in Physics 

JOHN CLEVELAND SALLIS 

BA., University of Arkansas; MA., Ph.D., Tulane University 

Instructor in Philosophy 

HUGH DOUGLAS WALKER 
B.A., MtGill University 
Instructor in Economics 

HAROLD SCOTT WELLS 

A.B., The Principia College; Ph.D., The University of California 

Instructor in Russian 

The Rev. WILLIAM ROBERT MERRILL 

B.S., M.S. in Psychology, Iowa State University; 

B.D., Episcopal Theological School 

Instructor 

ROY DRAYDON WELLS, Jr. 

B,A., Birmingham-Southern College; B.D., Vanderbilt Divinity School 

Instructor 

RALPH OLIN MARSH 

A.B., Emory University 

Assistant in Speech 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 25 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



EDWARD McCRADY, BA, M.S., Ph.D., LL.D., ScX)., L.H.D. j 

Fie f -Chancellor | 

GASTON SWINDELL BRUTON, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. | 

Provost 

i 

The Very Rev. GEORGE MOYER ALEXANDER, B.A., B.D., S.T.M., D.D., S.T.D. { 

Dean of the School of Theology 

ROBERT SAMUEL LANCASTER, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. | 

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences \ 

JOHN MAURICE WEBB, Bi. A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

The Rev. DAVID BROWNING COLLINS, B.A., B.D., S.T.M. 
Chaplain 

CHARLES O'CONNOR BAIRD, B.S., M.F., D.F. 
Acting Dean of Men in the College of Arts and Sciences ; 

The Rev. MASSEY HAMILTON SHEPHERD, JR. 
BA, MA., B.D., S.T.D., Ph.D., D.D., Lirr.D. 

Director, Graduate School of Theology 

The Rev. JOHN MAURICE GESSELL, B.A., B.D., Ph.D. 

Assistant to the Dean of the School of Theology 

DOUGLAS LOUGHMILLER VAUGHAN, JR., B.S. 

Treasurer 

GEORGE HENRY BARKER, B.S. 

Assistant Treasurer 

HENRY RICHARD MOODY, C.P.A. 
Bursar 

JOHN BOSTICK RANSOM, III, B.A., M.A., D.S. 

Director of Admissions 

BYRON WALTER WILDER, B.A. 

Assistant Director of Admissions 

WILLIAM GREGORY HARKINS, A.B., B.S. In L.S., MA. in L.S. 

Librarian 



26 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

JOHN IREL HALL HODGES, B.A., B.S. In L.S., MA. 
Associate Librarian 

Miss CORINNE BURG, B.A., B.S. in L.S. 

Catalogue Librarian 

Mrs. ELLEN BARNETT TIAdMONS, A.B., B.S. In L.S. 
Circulation Librarian 

STEVEN WILLIAM GAHAGAN, JR., BA., M.S. 

Acquisitions Librarian 

Miss MARY ANNE KERNAN, A.B., B.A. In L.S., MA. 
Reference Librarian 

*THOMAS EDWARD CAMP, BA., M.S. In L.S. 

Librarian, School of Theology 

Miss MARGARET ELIZABETH NEWHALL, A.B., B.S. In L.S., B.S. In Ed., MA. 
Assistant Librarian, School of Theology 

The Rev. FRANK WALL ROBERT, BA., B.D., M.S. 

Assistant Librarian, School of Theology 

WILLIAM PORTER WARE 

Registrar 

The Rt. Rev. FRANK ALEXANDER JUHAN, D.D. 
Director of Development 

ARTHUR BENJAMIN CHITTY, JR., B.A., M.A. 

Director of Public Relations, Executive Director of the Associated Alumni, 

and Historiographer 

Mrs. jean TALLEC 

Campaign Director 

ARTHUR CHARLES COCKETT, B.A. 

Development Coordinator 

Mrs. FREDERICK RHODES WHITESELL, Ph.B. 

Assistant Director of Public Relations 

WALTER DAVID BRYANT, JR., B.A., M.A. 

Director of Athletics 

SHIRLEY INMAN MAJORS 
Football Coach and Baseball Coach 



*0n leave second semester 1964-1965. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 2/ 

LON SHELTON VARNELL, B.S. 
Basketball Coach 

JAMES HORACE MOORE, JR., B.S. 

Wrestling Coach, Track Coach, and Assistant Football Coach 

CLARENCE CARTER, B.S. 

Assistant Coach in Football, Baseball, and Wrestling 

TED DANIEL BITONDO, B.S., M.S. 

Instructor in Physical Education and Swimming Coach 

Major FRANK RAYMOND MURRAY, USAF, B.A., M.S. 
Commander, Air Force ROTC 

T. Sgt. JOHN PAUL KEELING, USAF 

Supply Supervisor, Air Force ROTC 

T. Sgt. MARION RUDOLPH ENNIS, USAF 
Sgt. Mjr., Air Force ROTC 

S. Sgt. DALLAS JACK PILCHER, USAF 
Senior Clerk, Air Force ROTC 

ARNOLD MIGNERY, B..S.F., M.F. 
Officer in Charge, Sewanee Forestry Research Center 

JAMES DONALD BURTON, B.S.F., M.F., M.S. 
Research Forester 

THOMAS EMMET RUSSELL, B.S. 
Research Forester 

GLENDON WILLIAM SMALLEY, B.S.F., M.S. 
Research Forester 

MELVIN LEONARD SOUTHWICK, B.A. 

Administrator, Emerald-Hodgson Hospital 

HENRY TOMPKINS KIRBY-SMITH, M.D. 

Chiej of Medical Staff, Emerald-Hodgson Hospital 

JAMES CEDRIC GATES 

Commissioner of Buildings and Lands 
Business Manager and Director of Auxiliary Enterprises 

ARTHUR EDWARD NIMITZ, B.S. In C.E., B.S. In Arch. 
Architect and Engineer 

SOLLACE MITCHELL FREEMAN 

Superintendent of Leases, Military Property Custodian, 
and Manager of the Seioanee Union 



28 



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

THOMAS GORDON HAMILTON 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

ABBOTT GOTTEN MARTIN, B.A., M.A. 

Superintendent of the Setvanee Ravine Gardens 

JOHN GALHOUN SUTHERLAND 

Manager of the University Press 

PAUL WESLEY MOONEY 

Manager of the University Dairy 

RONALD WARD GOODMAN 

Manager of the University Farm 

DuVAL GARLAND GRAVENS, BA. 

Manager of the University Supply Store 

JAMES WILLIAM SHERRILL 
Manager of the University Laundry 

WILLIAM NATHANIEL PORTER 

Manager of Gailor Dining Hall 

LESLIE McLAURIN, LT. GOL., USAF 

Manager of the University Airport 



PROGTORS 

Barton Hall: JOHN RIGHARD SEMMER 
HERBERT RAY TUGKER 
Benedict Hall: *WILLIAM TURNER BERTRAND 

**JOPIN BURT SGOTT 

JOHN DOUGLAS SEITERS 
Gannon Hall: DOUGLAS DUANE PASGHALL 
Qeveland Hall: JOSEPHUS GONN GUILD GOLMORE 
Elliott Hall: WILLIAM ST. GLAIR WADE 
Gailor Hall: FRANK WEILAND STUBBLEFIELD (Head Proctor) 

RIGHARD LANDON SIMS 
Hoffman Hall: ELLWOOD BROWN H ANNUM 
Hunter Hall: JAMES ROBERT STEWART 
Johnson Hall: ROBERT LEE SWISHER, JR. 
McGrady Hall: PHILIP ANDES GONDRA 

RUPERT ADRIAN WALTERS, JR. 
St. Luke's Hall: WILLIAM EVANS JAMES 
Tuckaway Hall: JAGK PALMER SANDERS 
Woodland Apartments: DAVID IRVING SUELLAU 



*First Semester 
**Second Semester 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 29 

MATRONS 
Benedict Hall: Mrs. ROSALIE CURRY 
Cannon Hall: Mrs. A. L. GARDINER 
Qeveland Hall: Mrs. MARGARET L. JONES 
Elliott Hall: Mrs. WILLIAM T. DOSWELL 
Gailor Hall: Mrs. J. A. SHARP 
Hoffman Hall: Mrs. MILDRED MOORE 
Hunter Hall: Mrs. HELEN MARTIN 
Johnson Hall: Mrs. W. D. MASK 
McCrady Hall: Mrs. MARY CHANEY 
Tuckaway Hall: Mrs. ANITA WARING 



BARCLAY DEVANE WILSON, B.S. 
Sacristan, School of Theology 

SAMUEL GRAHAM GLOVER 

Assistant Sacristan 

JOHN MILTON McGINNIS, JR. 

Student Organist, School of Theology 

Mrs. KATHERINE KEEN STEWART 
Manager, St. Luke's Book Store 

JAMES FRANKLIN THAMES 
Student Fire Chief 



30 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

THE UNIVERSITY STANDING COMMITTEES 

Administrative Committees 

Athletic Board of Control: Professors Owen, Caldwell, McLeod; 
Vice-Chancellor McCrady; B. Humphreys McGee; student Wilbur 
Leon Wood, Jr. 

Catalogue: Provost Bruton; Deans Alexander, Webb; Professors 
Gilchrist, Moore, Turlington; Mr. Ransom. 

Faculty Chairman of Athletics: Professor Gaston S. Bruton. 

Fire Protection: Mr. Oates; Professor Cheston; Dr. Cameron; Mr. 
Hamilton, Mr. Vaughan; student James Franklin Thames. 

Lease: Vice-Chancellor McCrady; Professors Bruton, Cheston; Mr. 
Freeman, Mr. Oates. 



Faculty Committees 

Appointments and Promotions : Professors Whitesell, Buck, Winters; 
Mrs. Goodstein. 

Building Committee: Professors Grimes, Bates, Cheston, Harrison, 
McCrory, Whitesell; Mrs. Goodstein. 

Concerts Committee: Professors Guenther, Caldwell, Lockard, Mc- 
Crory, Ralston, B. J. Rhys, Running. 

duPont Lectures Committee: Professors Gessell, Buck, Grimes, 
J. H. W. Rhys; Mr. Lytle; students Louie Noland Pipes, Jr., Douglass 
Edward Myers, Jr. 

Graduate Scholarships: Professors Dugan, Bruton, Harrison, Ralston. 

Library: Professors Gilchrist, Gessell, Camp, Lancaster, Turlington; 
Mr. Harkins, Mr. Hodges. 

Publications Board: Mr. Chitty; Professors Baird, Griffin, Moore; 
Mr. Arnold, Mr. Lytle; students Heyward Hamilton Coleman, Josephus 
Conn Guild Colmore. 

Research Grants: Professors Yeatman, Degen, Ralston. 

Tenure: Professors J. H. W. Rhys, Caldwell, Thorogood, Whitesell. 



THE UNIVERSITY SENATE 3 1 

THE UNIVERSITY SENATE 

With powers and duties defined in the Ordinances of the University. 
Composed of the Vice-Chancellor, Deans, Chaplain, and all Full Professors. 

EDWARD McCRADY 

Vice-Chancellor, Chairman 

GASTON S. BRUTON 

JOHN S. MARSHALL 

ARTHUR B. DUGAN 

CHARLES T. HARRISON 

STRATTON BUCK 

CHARLES E. CHESTON 

JAMES E. THOROGOOD 

JAMES M. GRIMES 

H. MALCOLM OWEN 

DAVID B. COLLINS 

FREDERICK R. WHITESELL 

ROBERT S. LANCASTER 

GEORGE M. ALEXANDER 

MAURICE A. MOORE, III 

JOHN M. WEBB 

A. TIMOTHY PICKERING 

DAVID B. CAMP 

BAYLY TURLINGTON 

HARRY C. YEATMAN 

J. HOWARD W. RHYS 

FRANK R. MURRAY 



32 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

ADMISSION 
The University of the South embraces the College of Arts and 
Sciences and the School of Theology. Statements concerning admission 
will be found in the sections of this catalogue dealing with the two 
schools. Candidates for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences 
should communicate with the Director of Admissions, preferably at 
least a year prior to the date of entrance; candidates for the School 
of Theology should write to the Dean of the School of Theology to 
secure the proper application blanks. 

DEGREES 
The University of the South awards, on due examination, the de- 
grees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science in Forestry, Bachelor 
of Divinity, Master of Sacred Theology, Master of Arts in Teaching, 
and Licentiate in Theology. The honorary degrees of Doctor of Civil 
Law, Doctor of Letters, Doctor of Science, Doctor of Music, and Doctor 
of Divinity are conferred by the Board of Regents. 

EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS 
The University of the South is a member of the Southern As- 
sociation of Colleges and Schools, the Association of American Col- 
leges, the College Entrance Examination Board, the Tennessee College 
Association, the American Council on Education, the Southern Uni- 
versity Conference, and the Foundation of Episcopal Colleges. It is 
a contributing member of the American School of Classical Studies 
in Athens, Greece, and of the American Academy in Rome. The 
credits of The University of the South are accepted by all institu- 
tions of higher learning in this country and abroad. 

THE LIBRARY 

The first permanent stone structure erected in Sewanee, built by 
The Rev. Telfair Hodgson, D.D., was specifically for a library — a 
significant fact, emphasizing the conception of a library as the center 
of intellectual life of the University. This was in 1877, nine years 
after the University opened. This building was found, however, 
to be somewhat remote from the center of University activities, 
and when, at the beginning of the 90's, the Walsh Memorial Hall was 
completed as the chief building for academic purposes, the most fre- 



GENERAL INFORMATION 33 

quently used books were transferred to a large room in this building 
so as to be more accessible. Ten years later, in 1901, this working 
library and all collections of books belonging to the University were 
removed from the cramped quarters in Walsh Hall to the adjoining 
Convocation Building, which through the generosity of an alumnus 
was furnished and equipped for library purposes. This served as the 
main University library building until March, 1965, when the Jessie 
Ball duPont Library was completed and occupied. The new Library 
is an impressive addition to the facihties available to the students, 
faculty, and members of the Sewanee community. Three floors of 
the Library are now in use, with a fourth floor available for future 
expansion. A variety of seating will accommodate approximately 1,000 
persons, and the initial book capacity is 350,000 volumes, with the 
ultimate 600,000. 

The building, centrally located, is completely air-conditioned. Among 
its many attractive features are open stacks, generous provision for 
individual and small group study, faculty research studies, a night 
study room and smoking lounge, a music listening area, and an audi- 
torium seating 100. 

At present the book collection numbers approximately 130,000 vol- 
umes and is growing substantially each year under an accelerated 
acquisitions program. The Library is a designated depository of 
United States Government publications, and also subscribes to the lead- 
ing periodicals of both general and academic value. 

Apart from the regular annual appropriations by the University for 
the support of the Library, there may be noted: 

The Esther Elliott Shoup Book Fund — the income from $2,000 to 
be used for the purchase of books. 

The Polk Library Fund — $15,000, the gift of Mr. Frank L. Polk 
in memory of his grandfather and father. Bishop Leonidas Polk and 
Dr. William M. Polk. The income is used for the purchase of books. 

Other funds which contribute to the income of the Library at pres- 
ent are the Prescott Fund for books and periodicals; the Francis Fund 
for books in the field of history; and the William Alexander Percy 
Memorial Fund for the purchase of books by American authors. In 
addition to these endowments the Library has received many special 
gifts of books and money. Notable among the fine collections are the 
Fairbanks Collection of early Florida history; the Manigault Collection 
of foHos containing the works of famous medieval churchmen; and 
the Houghteling Collection of American History. 



34 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

All Saints' Chapel Is central to the religious life of the University. 
St. Luke's Chapel Is the chapel of the School of Theology, but all 
members of the University are welcome to attend its services. The 
University Chaplain lives In close contact with students and is a regu- 
lar member of the College Faculty. The Chaplain Is accessible to 
students at all times. 

Students In the college are required to attend chapel as follows: 
Gownsmen, daily chapel 30 times and Sunday services 6 times a se- 
mester; non-gownsmen, daily chapel 35 times and Sunday services 7 
times a semester. In All Saints' Chapel there Is a daily service of 
shortened Morning Prayer; Holy Communion Is celebrated and Even- 
ing Prayer Is said daily except on Wednesdays and Fridays. St. Luke's 
Chapel provides services of Holy Communion and Evening Prayer for 
those two days. During Lent there are special services, including a 
Twilight Service on Thursday evenings. 

College students participate actively, in many ways, in the life of 
All Saints' Chapel. The Student Vestry is an advisory council to the 
Chaplain; students serve as acolytes, cruclfers, and members of the Uni- 
versity Choir. 

There are numerous visitors throughout the year who speak or 
preach in the Chapel. Many of them hold conferences with groups of 
students at the Chaplain's house. 

THE ART GALLERY 

The Art Gallery is located In Lower Tuckaway Inn and Is under the 
supervision of the Chairman of the Department of Fine Arts. Exhibi- 
tions are held periodically during the year, and all are invited to submit 
entries. 

THE ORDER OF GOWNSMEN 

Students in both schools of the University — the College of Arts and 
Sciences and the School of Theology — are eligible, after meeting cer- 
tain requirements which are prescribed by the Faculties, to member- 
ship in the Order of Gownsmen. Gownsmen are distinguished by 
their academic dress. 

They enjoy certain privileges and Immunities, and they share re- 
sponsibility for maintaining the standards of student conduct. The 
Gownsmen's Committee on Discipline has direct authority to enforce 



GENERAL INFORMATION 35 

certain rules of conduct, and It serves as an advisory committee to 
the Dean of Men In dealing with more serious disciplinary matters. 

Members of the Order are chosen to serve as student Proctors, 
charged with the supervision of behavior and the care of property in 
University dormitories. The Proctors are under the direction of a 
student Head Proctor and are directly responsible to the Provost. 

THE HONOR CODE 
Students In the University subscribe, upon entrance, to an Honor 
Code, which assumes that any adequate conception of honor demands 
that a man shall not lie, steal, or cheat. All examinations are con- 
ducted under this code, and violations of the code are referred for 
judgment to a Student Honor Council, consisting of representatives 
from each class. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

Sopherim, a students' literary society. Is the mother chapter of 
Sigma Upsilon; It provides an opportunity for the practice and the 
criticism of imaginative writing. The Debate Council, for students 
Interested In public speaking, fosters both local and intercollegiate 
activity in debating and oratory. Purple Masque is a dramatic or- 
ganization; under its Faculty director. It stages a series of plays 
through the academic year. 

The following honor societies have chapters in the University: Phi 
Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi (scholarship), Omicron Delta Kappa 
(leadership). Blue Key (service), Pi Gamma Mu (social sciences), 
Alpha Psi Omega (dramatics), Sigma Upsilon (writing). Pi Sigma 
Alpha (political science), Sigma Pi Sigma (physics), and the Arnold 
Air Society. 

Eleven national social fraternities have chapters at Sewanee: ATO, 
5:AE, K2, $A0, ATA, KA, ^FA, SN, BOH, AXA, and X¥. These 
are governed by the laws of the University and by a Pan-Hellenic 
Council of their own representatives. Each of these fraternities has Its 
own chapter house. The Association of Independent Men is a social 
group. 

The Walters' Guild is composed of students who work in the dining 
hall. Several departments, Including Athletics, Forestry, French, Ger- 
man, Political Science, and Spanish have clubs to further students' in- 
terest and proficiency In these fields. In addition to fraternities, there 
are many social groups for students. 



36 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

LECTURES AND CONCERTS 

The University has an endowed lecture program known as the du- 
Pont Lectures. The lecturers, who are of international reputation, are 
chosen to represent the various fields of knowledge with particular re- 
gard to the fields of theology, humanities and languages, natural science, 
and social science. There are two memorial lectures: The William P. 
DuBose and the Samuel Marshall Beattie. In addition, many organi- 
zations and departments sponsor visiting lecturers in both general and 
particular fields throughout the year. 

The Concerts Committee, under faculty direction, presents annually 
a varied program of music, dance, drama, and films featuring distin- 
guished artists. Student organizations such as the German Club, Jazz 
Society, Choir, Glee Club, Purple Masque, and the Sewanee Com- 
munity Theatre not only provide entertainment but also permit par- 
ticipation of interested students. 

ATHLETICS 

The University of the South provides the most extensive and at- 
tractive facilities possible for athletic sports and recreation. In addition 
to the Juhan Gymnasium, described on page 14, the athletic facilities 
at Sewanee are two playing fields for football and baseball, a quarter- 
mile cinder track, a nine-hole golf course, seven all-weather tennis 
courts and an indoor tennis building. The Domain and adjacent area 
afford an unusual opportunity for hiking, hunting, camping, and caving. 

The University of the South maintains an intercollegiate athletic 
schedule and an intramural program in all sports. The University is, 
of course, not responsible for any injuries from participation In athletic 
sports. An Athletic Director, an instructor in Physical Education, and 
trained coaches direct the athletic sports. 

The control of Athletics Is In the hands of the Athletic Board of 
Control, composed of the Vice-Chancellor, and faculty, alumni, and 
student representatives. The University is a member of the Tennessee 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and the College Athletic Conference. 

VACCINATION 

All students are required to present upon entrance a physician's 
certificate showing a satisfactory immunization with typhoid, smallpox, 
and tetanus toxoid, either a full series or an adequate booster dose. 

It is strongly urged that immunization against poliomyelitis be 



GENERAL INFORMATION 37 

completed or brought up to date. In addition, it is wise for each stu- 
dent, just prior to coming, to have an influenza vaccination. 

AVIATION AND MILITARY SERVICE 

The United States Air Force, In cooperation with The University 
OF THE South, maintains a Reserve Officers' Training Corps which en- 
ables qualified students to earn Air Force Reserve Commissions while 
completing requirements for college degrees. Enrollment in this program 
Is voluntary. All ROTC courses give full credit toward graduation. 

The University of the South Airport (Jackson-Myers Field) Is on 
the domain, one mile from the campus. It Is 1,950 feet above sea level 
and has one paved runway, with boundary lights, 2,800 feet long lying 
northeast and southwest. The Airport is equipped with hangar, fuel, 
oil, and unlcom, and provides pilot training and air taxi services. The 
Hill Luce Memorial Building is used as the pilots' lounge and adminis- 
tration building. 

The Marine Corps offers commissions to a limited number of stu- 
dents through the Platoon Leaders Class (for freshmen, sophomores, 
and, occasionally, juniors) and the Officer Candidate Class (for seniors) 
programs. To enroll, a student must be between the ages of 17 and 
26, maintain a C average, and agree to serve on active duty for a 
minimum of three years. Members of these programs are exempt from 
Induction. 



38 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 



EXPENSES, 1965-66 

College of Arts and Sciences Each Semester 

Tuition $ 675.00 

*Student Activity Fee 40.00 

tinfirmary Fee 15.00 

Room 140.00 

Board 235.00 

Laundry 5S-00 

Total $1,160.00 

Students taking work in science pay also the following fees: In Chemistry a general 
fee of $8.00 per semester; in Biology a general fee of $10.00 per semester; in Physics 
a general fee of $6.00 per semester; and in Forestry and Engineering a general fee 
of $6.<X) per semester for laboratory courses. 
Students in the ROTC unit pay a fee of $5.00 each semester. 

A student who registers later than the day and time indicated will be required to pay 
a special fee of $15.00. In addition a student who fails to present himself for regis- 
tration will be charged $5.00 for each day he fails to register. 

School of Theology Each Semester 

Tuition $3S0-0O 

*Student Activity Fee 40.00 

tinfirmary Fee i5-oo 

Room 140.00 

Board 235.00 

Laundry 5S-00 

/ 

Total $835.00 

Rent in Woodland apartments is $29.50 per month, of which $4.00 is a charge for 
water. Maintenance fee in diocesan houses and apartments Is $30.00 per month; rent 
in Alston apartments and other University houses built for theological students is 
$40.00 per month. In these water is metered. 

The Clinical Training Fee, due the second semester of the Junior year, is $100.00. 

Each student should plan to spend about $100.00 a semester for books and should be 
provided with health and accident Insurance for himself and family. 



*$i.oo for subscription to The Sewanee Purple. 

tinfirmary fee and benefits applicable only to students residing In University 
dormitories, and only when school Is In session. 

Note: The University does not carry Insurance on the personal beloi.gings of stu- 
dents and therefore cannot be responsible to students for losses Incurred by fire, 
water, or other damage. 

The University dormitories and student dining halls will be closed during the 
Thanksgiving recess, the Christmas Holidays, and the Spring recess. 

Semester charges do not Include the cost of board and room during these periods. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 39 

EXPENSES 

The University of the South accepts a student only for an entire 
semester. The full charges for the semester are due and payable in 
advance upon entrance, and payment of all charges is an integral part 
of the student's registration. Any one who prefers to pay tuition and 
fees in monthly installments, however, may apply for a Tuition Plan 
Contract. Information regarding this method of payment will be 
furnished upon request. 

It is a regulation of the University that any student whose charges 
and fees, regular or special, are not paid in full will not be allowed to 
take his semester examinations. No transcript will be issued for a 
student whose account is unpaid. 

If a student, after registration, is dismissed from the University or 
withdraws for any cause except for illness, he is not entitled to any 
refund of the sum paid to the University or to cancellation of any sum 
due and payable to the University. In the event of a student's with- 
drawal from the University by reason of illness and with the advice 
of a physician, he may receive a refund of one-half of all charges for 
the period of time from his withdrawal to the end of the semester. A 
student is officially enrolled in the University for a semester im- 
mediately upon completion of his registration. 

If a student exercises the privilege of a charge account with one of 
the University's agencies, such as the University Supply Store or the 
Hospital, this account must be paid five days before semester examina- 
tions begin. It is customary for the student to present written au- 
thority of his parent for a charge account at the University Supply 
Store. 

The University does not charge a contingent fee. Any student 
responsible for damage to property shall pay the cost of repairs or 
replacement. All charges for damage to property become part of the 
student's account for the semester and must be paid before the se- 
mester examinations begin. A student is requested to report damage 
of property immediately to the Business Office and to assume respon- 
sibility for the cost of repairs if he is the person responsible. 

The charge for room includes, of course, cost of light, and this is 
interpreted by the University as the reasonable use of electric current 
in lamps or globes of customary size which provide the proper amount 
of light. The charge for room does not include current used in over- 
sized lamps, globes, electric cooking and heating appliances. The 



40 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

University charges, therefore, a fee of $2.50 a semester for each elec- 
tric cooking or heating appliance. 

Each application for admission to the College must be accompanied 
by an application fee of ^10.00. This fee is not refundable, and is not 
credited to the student's account. It is designed to offset a small por- 
tion of the expense of processing an application for admission. 

A reservation fee of $50.00 Is required of all students in the College. 
This is not an extra charge; it is credited to the student's account. For 
students already registered In the University, this fee Is payable by May 
I each year for the following academic year. New students must pay 
this fee by the Candidates Reply Date established by the College En- 
trance Examination Board (usually near the middle of May), or, if the 
application for admission is accepted after that date, within two weeks 
of the date of acceptance of the application. The reservation fee is not 
refundable, except in those cases in which the student Is prevented from 
entering the University by serious illness, or by being drafted by the 
Selective Service. 

The student activity fee covers athletic privileges, including free 
admission to intercollegiate events, subscriptions to The Sewanee Pur- 
ple, The Cap und Gown, and The Mountain Goat, and the support of 
student activities in general. 

A graduation fee of $10.00 is charged. 

The infirmary fee covers care at Emerald-Hodgson Hospital and the 
general services of a physician while school is in session, but does not 
cover special costs such as surgery, medicine. X-ray plates, and the 
like. 

The laundry fee covers laundry service for the following number of 
articles each week: 6 shirts, 4 suits underwear, 6 pairs socks, i pajama 
suit, 5 handkerchiefs, 3 towels, 2 sheets, i pillowslip, i bedspread, t 
wash cloth, i pair wash pants. For laundry in excess of this total, the 
University charges according to the cost for each article. 

All students are required to live In the University halls or in places 
approved by the University. All students are required to take their 
meals In the University dining halls. This provision does not apply, 
of course, to young men who live at home with their families in the 
vicinity of the University and who attend the College as day students. 

Each dormitory room Is furnished with a single bed with mattress, 
a desk and chair, bookcase, and closet space for each student. The 
student should furnish his own pillow and bed linens, which should 



GENERAL INFORMATION 4I 

include at least 4 sheets, 4 pillow cases, 2 blankets, and 2 spreads for a 
single bed. Some form of desk lamp is also needed. 

Students in the School of Theology should provide themselves with 
a cassock and surplice. Academic gowns may be purchased after ar- 
rival at the University. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Scholarships and other forms of financial aid are available for stu- 
dents in the College of Arts and Sciences and in the School of Theology. 
Details of the financial aid program are given beginning on page 142 
for the College and page 154 for the School of Theology. 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences who are residents of 
Franklin County, Tennessee, or who are sons of Episcopal clergymen 
receive a partial remission of fees at the discretion of the Vice-Chan- 
cellor. 

THE UNIVERSITY PRESS 

The University Press is equipped to print ecclesiastical and schol- 
arly books, various journals, yearbooks, and catalogues. 

The Press publishes the regular bulletins of the University, several 
student periodicals, and The Sewanee Review, a literary quarterly 
edited by Andrew Lytle. Student publications are: The Sewanee 
Purple, a weekly newspaper; The Cap and Gown, the Sewanee an- 
nual; The St. Luke's Journal, a theological review; and The Mountahi 
Goat, a literary and humor magazine. 

AUTOMOBILES 

Freshmen and students with scholarships awarded through the Lini- 
versity may not own or maljQtain automobiles, motorcycles, or motor 
scooters. Students who have earned at least sophomore standing may 
own and operate automobiles. Members of the Order of Gownsmen 
will enjoy certain parking privileges which are not extended to other 
students. Exceptions to the foregoing restrictions will be made by the 
Dean of Men only under the most compelling circumstances. Students 
in the School of Theology may own and operate automobiles. All au- 
tomobiles must be registered with the Dean of Men. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



44 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF 
THE COLLEGE FACULTY, 1964-1965 

Faculty Committees 

Admissions and Scholarships: Deans Webb, Baird; Provost Bruton; 
Mr. Ransom; Professors Guenther, Grimes, Caldwell, Yeatman, 
Pickering. 

Committees: Professors Whitesell, Caldwell, Keele; Dean Webb. 

Curriculum: Dean Webb; Professors Guenther, Goodstein, Pickering, 
Brettmann, Dugan. 

Degrees: Dean Webb; Professors Owen, Buck, Dorn, McLeod, Moore, 
Keele. 

Discipline: Dean Baird; Chaplain Collins; Professors Allen, Camp, 
Grimes. 

Honorary Degrees: Professors Pickering, Grimes, B. J. Rhys. 

Sabbatical Leave: Dean Webb; Professors Buck, Dugan, Owen. 

Student Activities: Dean Baird; Professors Moore, Keele, Webber. 

Administrative Committees 

Combined Engineering Plan: Professors Allen, Camp, Johnson, Mc- 
Leod; Mr. Ransom. 

Pre-Medical Advisory: Professors Camp, Foreman, Yeatman; Dean 
Baird; Mr. Arnold, Mr. Ransom; Dr. Parsons. 

Student Placement: Dean Baird; Professor Keele. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 45 

ADMISSION 

A student wishing to seek admission to the College of Arts and 
Sciences should communicate with the Director of Admissions to obtain 
the proper application blanks and any detailed information which may 
be required. An .application for admission should preferably be sub- 
mitted no later than the beginning of the applicant's last semester in 
secondary school. 

An applicant may be admitted to the College of Arts and Sciences 
directly from secondary school in either of two ways: 

1. By certificate from an accredited secondary school and the results 
of the College Entrance Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude Test. 
A certificate should show at least 15 acceptable units of credit. 

2. By examination. 

Usually, an applicant will submit a transcript of his secondary school 
work during his last year in school, giving the record of work completed 
and indicating courses being pursued during the senior year. Condi- 
tional admission may be based upon this transcript, but final admission 
will await receipt of a transcript showing satisfactory completion of 
the secondary school course. 

The Committee on Admissions is more interested in a prospective 
student's general promise and in the quality of his work than in the 
completion of specifically required courses. But it will give preference 
to applicants who have pursued a regular college preparatory course in 
secondary school. This normally includes the following subjects: 

English, four years Foreign Language, ancient or modern, 

*Mathematics, three or four years two or more years 

History or Civics, one or more years Natural Sciences, one or more years 

*Three years of college preparatory mathematics is considered the minimum prepa- 
ration for a student to pass the required freshman mathematics course at Sewanee. 

College Entrance Examinations : 

Each applicant for admission to the College is required to take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test given by the College Entrance Examination 
Board. College Entrance Examination Board Achievement Tests v/IU 
be required of applicants In English, Mathematics, and a foreign lan- 
guage. Applicants without two years of foreign language credit at the 
junior or senior high school level may substitute an Achievement Test 
in the sciences. 

College Board Examinations are given In centers throughout the 
country in December, January, February, March, May, and August 



46 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

each year. There is also a September administration of the examina- 
tion at some of the member colleges. Normally, the December, Janu- 
ary, February, or March test should be taken during the applicant's 
senior year in school. The December or January administration of 
the tests is preferred. 

Information on College Board Examinations, and application blanks 
for the tests, may usually be obtained from the applicant's school, or 
the applicant may write to the College Entrance Examination Board, 
Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey. (Applicants living in New Mexico, 
Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, and states to the west of these should 
write to the College Entrance Examination Board, P. 0. Box 27896, 
Los Angeles 27, California). The College Board Bulletin of Informa- 
tion, which will be sent to all persons requesting application blanks, 
lists testing centers throughout the country and abroad. Normally, the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test and the achievement tests will be taken at 
the center nearest the applicant's home or school; a special center will 
be established for any applicant living farther than 5 miles from a 
regular testing center if application for the establishment of the spe- 
cial center is made at least five weeks before the date of the test. 

There is a sm,all fee for the Scholastic Aptitude Test and for three 
Achievement Tests. The appropriate fee should be returned to the 
College Entrance Examination Board with the completed application 
for the test, and should not be sent to The University of the South. 

Physical Examinations: 

On being admitted to the College, a student will be required to file 
a report of a physical examination and a record of his health. 

Certificates: 

Certificates are accepted from secondary schools which are accredited 
by various regional Associations of Colleges and Secondary Schools. In 
some instances, certificates may be accepted from schools not on these 
lists whose work is known and approved by the Committee on Ad- 
missions and Scholarships. 

Every student who wishes to be admitted by certificate should write 
to the Director of Admissions for a blank form to be filled in by the 
Principal of his school. 

This certificate, signed by the Principal of the school and containing 
his statement of recommendation, should normally be mailed by him to 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 47 

the Director of Admissions at as early a date as possible following the 
completion of the applicant's seventh semester of school work. Appli- 
cants with superior records who wish to request early decision on their 
applications and who have already taken the College Board Scholastic 
Aptitude Test and the three required achievement tests, may ask that 
the certificate be sent at any time after the beginning of the senior year. 
In this case, the certificate should show the applicant's record for three 
years and should contain a complete list of courses in progress. 

A blank form for the submission of a supplementary transcript at 
the end of the senior year will be sent directly to the school. 

The Early Decision Plan: 

In order to reduce the necessity for many students to file application 
at several colleges The University of the South offers an Early De- 
cision Plan. The Plan is designed for the student whose first college 
choice Is The University of the South and whose secondary school 
record, test scores, recommendations, and extracurricular activities 
indicate that he is an excellent applicant. By satisfactorily fulfilling 
the admission requirements the well qualified student may receive 
favorable action on his application by November i of his senior year. 

Procedure: 

The student applying for early decision should proceed as follows: 

1. Indicate by letter that he is applying for early decision, that The 
University of the South is his first choice, and that he will not apply 
to any other college until a decision is reached under this plan. 

2. Present all credentials necessary for admission and, if applicable, 
for financial aid (including the Parents' Confidential Statement of the 
College Scholarship Service) to The University of the South no later 
than November i. If all necessary information has not been received 
by this date, the University does not guarantee a decision under the 
Early Decision Plan. 

3. Fulfill all testing requirements not later than the summer follow- 
ing the junior year. The July test date prior to the senior year is the 
last scheduled testing of the College Entrance Examination Board 
that will assure the candidate consideration under this program. 

4. If successful, the applicant must confirm his acceptance by De- 
cember I with payment of the non-returnable reservation fee of 
$50.00. 



48 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Under this Plan The University of the South agrees to the follow^ 
ing: 

1. To reach a decision on admission and on financial aid, if appli- 
cable, by November 15. 

2. If a definite decision of acceptance or rejection is not reached by- 
December I, the Ujniversity will notify the student that his applica- 
tion will receive unbiased consideration under the regular admissions 
procedure, and that he is free to make application to other colleges. 
These students will be urged to retake the required tests and to submit 
a transcript of their first semester grades received during their senior 
year. 

3. Not to require the accepted candidate who commits himself to 
matriculate and who pays the reservation fee to take additional ad- 
missions tests. 

All inquiries in regard to the Early Decision Plan should be directed 
to the Director of Admissions, The University of the South, Sewa- 
nee, Tennessee. 

Admission by Examination: 

Students desiring to take, or required to take, entrance examinations 
to satisfy the requirements for admission should communicate with the 
Director of Admissions as early as possible before the date of entrance. 
Preferably, this should be in the fall or early winter preceding the date 
of entrance. 

Advanced Placement: 

Advanced placement may be granted to entering students who, in 
certain courses, pass the College Entrance Examination Board Ad- 
vanced Placement Tests. This advanced placement must have the ap- 
proval of the chairmen of the departments concerned. In some in- 
stances, college credit may accompany advanced placement; see page 54. 

Advanced Standing: 

Students coming from other colleges which are members of their 
regional educational associations should show detailed evidence of the 
work done there in the form of official transcripts from all colleges at- 
tended. On the basis of this evidence, or on the evidence of examina- 
tions, transfer credit will be granted at the discretion of the Faculty 
Committee on Degrees. Normally, credit is granted in all work of a 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 49 

liberal nature in which the student has made a grade of C or better. 
Students transferring from other institutions must meet, upon entrance, 
the requirements demanded of our own students. Since the College 
requires two years of residence for a degree, no transfer student may 
be admitted into the senior year as a candidate for a degree. 

ROOM ASSIGNMENTS 

Rooms are assigned by the Dean of Men. Priority in the selection 
of rooms is given to students already in the College; the current occu- 
pant of a room has priority in the choice of that room. Students 
entering the College are invited to express choice of rooms or dormi- 
tories and to express preference for a roommate, though no assurance 
is given that such requests can be granted. An upperclassman who 
has not paid his reservation fee for the following year by the desig- 
nated date forfeits all priority in the selection of a room. Where all 
other considerations are equal, preference will be given in the assign- 
ment of rooms to those applications bearing the earliest date. 

THE ACADEMIC YEAR 

The regular session of the College of Arts and Sciences is divided 
into two semesters. A summer session of eight weeks is also offered. 

The first semester for the session of 1965-66 will begin on September 
12 and end on January 29. The second semester will begin on Febru- 
ary I and end on June 5. The summer term of 1965 begins on June 
21 and ends on August 14. 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

All students are expected to register at the prescribed time at the 
beginning of each semester. A student who registers later than the day 
indicated in the University Calendar will be required to pay a special 
fee of ^15.00. In addition, a resident student who fails to present him- 
self for registration will be charged $5.00 for each day he fails to 
register. 

A student who withdraws from the College without notifying the 
Dean of the College will not be entitled to honorable dismissal. This 
applies to a student who withdraws between the two semesters of a 
single academic year, as well as to one who withdraws during a se- 
mester. 



50 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

ADVISING SYSTEM 

Shortly after registration, each student is assigned by the Dean of 
Men to a faculty adviser v^ho has general supervision of his college 
course and to whom the student may refer any academic or personal 
problems. Each week-day afternoon an academic counselor Is on duty 
for consultation. 

THE GRADING SYSTEM AND STUDENT CLASSIFICATION 

The work of students In College courses Is graded according to the 
following system: the grade A means excellent; B, good; C, average; 
D, passing; F, failing; I, Incomplete. 

The grade I Is given only when a student fails to complete the work 
of a course for legitimate and unavoidable reasons. 

Averages are computed in grade points. Each semester hour of 
academic credit with the grade A carries with It four grade points; each 
hour with the grade B, three grade points; each hour with the grade 
C, two grade points; each hour with the grade D, one grade poltnt. 

Class standing ,and eligibility for graduation are determined by the 
number of semester hours and the number of quality credits a student 
has earned. Each semester hour with the grade A carries with it three 
quality credits; each hour with the grade B, two quality credits; each 
hour with the grade C, one quality credit. 

A Freshman Is a student who has fewer than 24 hours of credit or 
fewer than 18 quality credits. 

A Sophomore has at least 24 hours and at least 18 quality credits. 

A Junior has at least 60 hours and at least 54 quality credits. 

A Senior has at least 92 hours and at least 86 quality credits. 

A Special Student is one who by permission of the Dean of the Col- 
lege is admitted to certain courses without being required to present 
the full entrance requirements or to carry the number of courses pre- 
scribed for regular students. Only students twenty-one years old or 
older may be admitted as special students. Work done by a special 
student will not count toward a degree unless such a student Is accorded 
regular standing. 

MEMBERSHIP IN THE ORDER OF GOWNSMEN 
Membership in the Order of Gownsmen is extended to Sophomore 
students with a grade point average of 3.0 based on two semesters of 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 51 

college work who have satisfied two semesters of the physical education 
requirement and who are not deficient in Chapel attendance. 

Membership in the Order Is extended to Juniors at the end of any 
semester in which a Junior student earns a grade point average of 2.25 
provided he has satisfied the physical education requirement and is 
not deficient in Chapel attendance. 

Membership in the Order Is extended to Senior students at the end 
of any semester in which a Senior student earns a grade point average 
of 2.0 provided he has satisfied the physical education requirement 
and is not deficient in Chapel attendance. 

Subject to faculty regulation, voluntary class attendance is a privilege 
of membership in the Order of Gownsmen. 

Consistent with the interest of the University and the principle of 
responsibility, members of the Order are required to attend Dally 
Chapel 30 times a semester and Sunday Chapel 6 times during a 
semester. 

Mem.ber&hip In the Order, with its privileges, shall be revoked by the 
Dean of the College at the end of any semester in which a member falls 
below the grade point average required for membership. 

Membership in the Order may be revoked upon the recommendation 
of the Dean of Men or the Discipline Committee of the College Faculty 
for any disciplinary Infraction reflecting upon the principle of respon- 
sibility upon which the Order rests. 

Gownsmen are permitted to hold four morning meetings during a 
semester, each meeting to be held at a different hour. Members of 
the Order shall be excused from classes to attend these meetings. 

Completion of the Physical Education requirement shall not be pre- 
requisite to membership in the Order of Gownsmen for students trans- 
ferring from schools with no comparable requirement. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

All students except first-semester Freshmen will be required to pass 
three courses each semester, each course carrying three or more hours 
of semester credit. A first-semester Freshman will be required to pass 
two courses, each course carrying three or more hours' credit. A student 
whose only previous college experience is a single summer-school term 
will be considered a first-semester Freshman. Students with more 
college experience, regardless of the number of credits earned, will not 
be considered first-semester Freshmen. Semester hours and quality 



52 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

credits earned in summer school are considered as having been earned 
during the preceding academic year. 

To be eligible to re-enroll the following year: 

A first-year Freshman will be required to pass not fewer than i8 se- 
mester hours and to accumulate not fewer than 12 quality credits for 
the academic year. 

A second-year student will be required to pass not fewer than 24 
semester hours for the academic year, and to have accumulated not 
fewer than 30 quality credits. 

A third-year student will be required to pass not fewer than 24 se- 
mester hours for the academic year, and to have accumulated not fewer 
than 60 quality credits. 

A fourth-year student will be required to pass not fewer than 24 se- 
mester hours for the academic year, and to have accumulated not fewer 
than 100 quality credits. 

Students who fail to meet these requirements will be suspended for 
one semester. If, after a period of suspension, a student makes formal 
application and is re-admitted, he will be required either to earn not 
fewer than twenty-five quality credits a year or to meet the standard 
for each stage of academic residence. A student who has, for academic 
reasons, been suspended for a semester may apply for re-admission 
after the end of the semester of suspension. 

DROPPING COURSES 

During the first week of school, a student may drop a course with- 
out its appearing on his permanent record card. 

Prior to one week before mid-semester, studebts who have the ap- 
proval of the Dean may drop a course with the grade of "WP" (with- 
drew passing). 

After mid-semester, a student will normally receive a grade of "WF" 
(withdrew failing). However, under compelling circumstances, with 
the approval of the Dean and the Degrees Committee, a student may 
drop a course with a grade of "WP". 

In computing the student's semester or overall average, the grade 
^WP" will be considered "as a grade of "D." The grade "WF" will be 
averaged as a failing grade. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 53 

The expression "without penalty" used at any time on a drop slip 
from the Dean's Office to the Registrar's Office will signify a condition 
similar to dropping a course during the first week of school, except that 
the course having now been entered on the student's permanent record 
card, will have a "W" In the grade column. In computing the student's 
iverage, no grade will be used. 

DEGREES 

In the College of Arts and Sciences, the degrees of Bachelor of Arts 
and Bachelor of Science in Forestry are conferred. 

Applications for Degrees 

All candidates for degrees must announce their candidacy to the 
Dean of the College early in their seventh semester. No student who 
fails to make this application at the time designated will be recom- 
mended for a degree. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF 
ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FORESTRY 

A minimum of 128 semester hours and 120 quality credits is re- 
quired for either the degree of Bachelor of Arts or the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science in Forestry. In order to qualify for a degree, a student 
must meet the requirements as prescribed here. 

I. Prescribed Courses 

I. For the degree of Bachelor of Arts: 

(a) A year-course In mathematics. 

(b) Two semesters of laboratory courses in Chemistry, Physics, or Biology. 

(c) English 101-102. 

(d) Two semester Courses in Philosophy or two semester courses in Religion. 

(e) Completion of one language through the third year level or two languages 
through the second year level. 

{f) History 101-102. 

(g) Economics loi and a semester of Political Science, or two semesters in either 
Economics or Political Science. 

{h) Four semesters of Air Science or I*hysical Education. 

(i) Completion of Chapel attendance requirements. 

(j) Before beginning his third academit year of study, a student must have satis- 
fied the prescribed course requirements m English, History, Mathematics, and 



54 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

laboratory science. In addition, he must have fulfilled at least one year of 
the foreign language requirement, (Effective September, 1965.) 
2. For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry the same comrses are prescribed 
as for the Bachelor of Arts degree except that the language requirement may be 
fulfilled by the completion of one language through the second year level. 

NoHTEs: I. It is possible to satisfy any required course by examination. 

2. The level of language proficiency is usually determined by the use of an achieve- 
ment test. 

3. A minimum of two years in residence, including the final year, is required of all 
those upon whom degrees may be conferred. 

II. The Major Subject 

1. At or before the end of his Sophomore year, a student will select a major sub- 
ject. Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts may major in any one of the 
following departments: Biology, Chemistry, Classical Languages, Economics, English, 
Fine Arts, French, German, History, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physics, Political 
Science, Psychology, Religion, and Spanish. 

2. To be accepted as a major in one of these departments a candidate must have 
maintained at least a C average in the courses already taken in the subject. If, at 
the end of the Sophomore year, a student In good standing in the College is not 
qualified to major in the subject he chooses, he may be permitted to register for an 
additional year in the College; but, if, at the end of the additional year, he is still 
unqualified, he will not be permitted to register again. 

3. A major shall consist of not more than 42 semester hours in a department. 

4. Every candidate for a degree must take a comprehensive examination in his 
major subject. To be eligible for the comprehensive examination, he must have 
maintained at least a C average In his major courses. A student may not take a 
comprehensive examination unless he has been accepted as a major In the department 
not later than the beginning of the semester previous to the semester in which he 
takes the comprehensive examination. 

III. Credit by Examination 

I. College credit may be granted on the basis of the College Entrance Examination 
Board Advanced Placement Tests subject to the following conditions: 

(a) A grade of 3 or better is required. 

(b) Credit Is awarded at the discretion of the chairman of the department con- 
cerned after examination of the test and paper and consultation with the Dean 
of the College and /or the Degrees Committee. 

(c) Credit granted In a foreign language may not exceed six semester hours; credit 
may not be awarded in a foreign student's native language. 

(d) Credit In non-language courses may be granted In the course tested only if it 
is recognized by The University of the South. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES •55 

IV. Degrees With Honors 

A student who has fulfilled the degree requirements with a general grade point 
average of 3.75 and honors on his comprehensive examinations will receive his degree 
Summa Cum Laude. A student with a general grade point average of 3.5 and honors 
on his comprehensive examinations will receive his degree Magna Cum Laude. A 
Gtudent with a grade-point average of 3.0, with or without honors on his comprehensive 
examinations, will receive his degree Cum Laude. 



ENGINEERING 

There has been concern among our nation's educators and industrial 
leaders over the limited number of courses provided in liberal arts in 
the four-year curriculum offered by technical schools to students in 
various branches of engineering. 

With the hope of broadening the engineering student's outlook and 
educational background, The University of the South h,as entered 
into agreement with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Columbia Uni- 
versity, Georgia Institute of Technology, and New York University 
for the cooperative education of students in engineering. Under these 
plans the student will attend The University of the South for three 
years, during which time he will take courses in the humanities and 
the social sciences while obtaining an adequate foundation in mathe- 
matics, physics, and chemiistry. At the end of his third year at 
Sewanee, if he has met the course requirements and has maintained a 
satisfactory overall average, he will transfer to the engineering school 
of his choice, where he will concentrate in his chosen field of engineer- 
ing for two years. 

At the end of the combined five-year course, the student will receive 
from Sewanee the degree of Bachelor of Arts while at the same time 
receiving an appropriate degree In engineering from the engineering 
school. 

Since Rensselaer, Georgia Institute of Technology, and New York 
University also have Air Force ROTC programs, the student may con- 
tinue participation in the ROTC unit at these institutions and receive 
his commission as a Second Lieutenant in the Air Force at the same 
time that he receives the two degrees. 

A student who wishes to follow the Combined Engineering Plan 



S6 



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 



should State his intention before registering for his freshman year at 
Sewanee and should select the following schedule: 



First Year 
English 1 01- 1 02 
History 101-102 
French or German 
Mathematics 103-104 
Physics 1 01- 102 
(Air Science 101-102) 



Second Year 
English 201-202 
Chemistry 101-102 
French or German 
Mathematics 201-202 
Advanced Physics 
(Air Science 201-202) 



Third Year 
Economics or Pol. Science 
Philosophy or Religion 
French or German 
Mechanics 
Engineering Drawing and 

Descriptive Geometry- 
Elective 
(Air Science 301-302) 

Students preparing for Chemical Engineering will take two or three 
years of Chemistry and one or two years of Physics. 

PRE-MEDICAL CURRICULUM 

A student who plans to enter medical school will have opportunities 
to consult with the Faculty Pre-Medical Advisory Committee from 
the beginning of his Freshman year. The Committee has drawn up 
several different curricula providing for a major in Biology, in Chem- 
istry, or in other fields. Each student will be advised according to his 
individual aptitude and need. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION 



AEROSPACE STUDIES 

Professor Murray, Major, USAF 

Assistant Professor Campbell, Major, USAF 

Assistant Professor Kepley, Capt., USAF 

General Information: 

The Department of Aerospace Studies is the academic department 
established by the University and the United States Air Force to teach 
the courses prescribed by the Air Force Reserve Officers Training 
Corps. 

The basic purpose of the department is to produce officers of ap- 
propriate quality to satisfy stated Air Force Officer requirements. This 
purpose is achieved by providing those students who desire to serve in 
the Air Force appropriate precommissioning education and training to 
qualify them for commissions as second lieutenants and active duty 
as junior officers. All Aerospace Studies courses give full credit as 
elective subjects toward degree requirements. 

The chairman of the department is an Air Force Officer who Is desig- 
nated by the University, in coordination with the United States Air 
Force, as Professor of Aerospace Studies. He is also Commander of 
the Air Force ROTC detachment. The officers and airmen on his staff 
?.re members of the United States Air Force. 

The Air Force ROTC provides a four-year aerospace studies cur- 
riculum divided Into two specific areas: .a two-year "General Military 
Education Program" (Freshman and Sophomore years) and a two- 
year "Professional Officer Education Program" (Junior and Senior 
years). 

There are four options available to students who are Interested In 
the Aerospace Studies curriculum. 

(i) A four-year financial assistance program leading to a commis- 
sion. Scholarship grants under this program may include all 
tuition and books plus a fifty-dollar per month retainer fee for 
the full four years. These scholarships are limited In number and 
are offered on a nationwide competitive basis. 

(2) A four-year program leading to a commission which does not 
provide full financial assistance but does provide a forty-to-fifty- 



58 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

dollar per month retainer fee during the Junior and Senior 
years. 

(3) A two-year program leading to a commission. Students par- 
ticipating In this program attend a concentrated six-week Field 
Training Course at an Air Force Base during the summer be- 
tween their Sophomore and Junior years. Satisfactory comple- 
tion of this course equips them academically and militarily to 
enroll in the last two years of the Aerospace Studies curriculum 
for the purpose of achieving a commission. This program pays 
them approximately ^120 for the six-week Field Training Course 
plus the forty to fifty dollar per month retainer fee during the 
Junior and Senior years. 

(4) A two-year program of General Military Education for those 
Freshmen and Sophomores who do not desire a commission but 
who would like to include in their academic background some 
knowledge of the relatlomship of military power to the issues 
underlying International tensions, and some practical training 
in basic leadership. Juniors and Seniors in this category may 
enroll In the Professional Officer courses as special students who 
are taking the courses for academic credit only. 

Summer Training Unit: 

The Professional Officer Education Program (Junior and Senior 
years) includes a four-week Summer Training Unit at an Air Force 
Base. Cadets pursuing a four-year commissioning program attend 
this training unit during the summer between their Junior and Senior 
years or Immediately following graduation. They are paid approxi- 
mately $120 during the summer training period. 

Deferment from Selective Service Induction: 

Natioinal Selective Service laws provide a quota to the Air Force 
ROTC for deferment of cadets from induction into the armed services. 
T'reshman and Sophomore cadets who ^are not participants in the fi- 
nancial assistance program may be selected for deferment within this 
quota on the basis of their relative standing with other cadets based on 
academic grades and military qualifications. 

Enlistment in the Air Force Reserve: 

Those cadets who are receiving scholarship grants under the financial 
assistance program and those Juniors and Seniors who are recipients 
of the forty-to-fifty dollar per month retainer fee are required to be 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 59 

members of the Air Force enlisted reserve. They are not subject to 
call to active duty while in cadet status. Upon being commissioned, 
they enter the Air Force for a four-year tour of iactive duty if they are 
non-flying officers and for a five-year tour if they are flying officers. 
Cadets enlisted in the reserve who are not able to complete the Aero- 
space Studies program because of reasons beyond their control, such as 
academic, financial, or physical inability, will be discharged from the 
reserve simultaneously with their disenrollment from the Air Force 
ROTC. 

Flying and Flying Training: 

Freshman and Sophomore cadets are usuially offered at least one op- 
portunity to participate in an orientation flight to an Air Force base. 
Those cadets who are members of the enlisted reserve are authorized 
to travel via Air Force aircraft on a space available basis. Cadets who 
are aptitudinally land physically qualified for Air Force pilot training 
receive 36}^ hours of flight training during their Senior year. This 
training may culminate in a private pilot's license. 

Books and Uniforms: 

Aerospace Studies textbooks and Air Force uniforms are furnished 
free to all cadets. Initial uniform alterations are at government ex- 
pense. Cadets are required to maintain uniforms in their possession 
clean and neat at their own expense. Any of these furnished items 
which are lost or damaged are charged to the cadet. 

Course Requirements: 

Certain selected courses In other departments of the University are 
required as a part of the Aerospace Studies curriculum. Freshmen 
must enroll in and satisfactorily complete History 10 1. Sophomores 
must, during their second semester, complete a specific course to be 
designated by the Professor of Aerospace Studies. This course will be 
In addition tO' the Aerospace Studies curriculum. 

General Military Education Program 
(Freshman and Sophomore Years) 

iOl. Leadership Training Class. 

One hour, (C-edit, one hour), 

102. World Military Systems. 

An introductory course exploring the causes of present international tensions and 



6o THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

the role and relationship of military power in general and national aerospace forces 
in particular to those tensions. Lectures, two hours; Leadership Training Class, 
one hour. (Credit, two hours). 

20L World Military Systems. 

Continued study of world military forces, and the political-military issues surround- 
ing the existence of these forces. Special emphasis on forces established by regional 
treaty such as NATO, CENTO, SEATO, and the Warsaw Pact and on the future 
trends and implications of world aerospace power. Lectures, two hours; Leadership 
Training Class, one hour. (Credit, two hours). 
202. Leadership Training Class. 

One hour. (Credit, one hour). 



Professional Officer Education Program 
(Junior and Senior Years) 

301-302. Growth and Development of Aerospace Power. 

A two^semester study of the nature of war; development of aerospace power in the 
United States; mission and organization of the Defense Department; Air Force con- 
cepts, doctrine, and employment; astronautics and space operations, and the future 
development of aerospace power. Includes the United States space programs, vehicles, 
systems, and problems in space exploration. Three class hours per week, and one 
hour of leadership training. (Credit, three hours each semester). 

401-402. The Professional Officer. 

A two-semester study of professionalism, leadership, and management. Includes the 
meaning of professionalism, professional responsibilities, the military justice system, 
leadership theory, functions and practices, management prmciples and functions, 
problem solving, and management tools, prattices, and controls. Three class hours 
per week and one hour of leadership training. (Credit, three hours each semester). 



BIOLOGY 

Professor Owen 

Professor Yeatman 

Associate Professor Foreman 

Assistant Professor Ramseur 

The Department of Biology requires 28 semester hours plus a mini- 
mum of 2 semester hours of Seminar for a major. Additional require- 
ments are: i year of Chemistry; i year of Physics; 2 years of Mathe- 
matics (2 years of AFROTC may be substituted for i year of Mathe- 
matics). The foreign language requirement for the B.A. degree may 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 6l 

be satisfied by completing 3 years of German or 3 years of French, but 
it is recommended th,at a student have two year-courses in each of 
these languages. 

For a first-year student who plans to major In Biology, the following 
curriculum is recommended: 

Chemistry 101-102 History 101-102 

Mathematics 103-104 English 101-102 

German or French 101-102 AFROTC or Physical Education 

Biology 101-102 is prerequisite for all other courses in Biology. 

101-102. General Biology. 

(loi: Zoology; 102: Botany). A study of the basic facts and principles of animal 
and plant biology. The laboratory is designed to Illustrate the principles of biology 
and to familiarize the students with the structure and function of animals and plants. 
Credit for the semesters separately will be granted only to students who have met 
the bask requirements In Science. (Credit, eight hours). Staff. 

201. Embryology. 

A detailed study of the development stages In Amphloxus, the frog, the chick, the 
pig, and the human. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four 
hours). Mr. Yeatman. 

202. Inverterbrate Zoology. 

A detailed study of the classification, morphology, and function of free-living 
representatives of all the phyla, exclusive of the Insects. Lectures, three hours; labora- 
tory, three hours. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Yeatman. 

203. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. 

A comparative study, by systems, of provertebrate chordates and the vertebrates. 
Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Yeatman. 

204. Parasitology. 

An mtroductlon to animal parasites, covering the morphology, distribution, and 
extent of parasitism, with particular emphasis on the host-parasite relationship. 
Lectures, two hours; laboratory, four hours. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, 
four hours). Mr. Owen. 

205. Systematic Botany. 

A study of ferns and seed plants. Including the collection and Identification of 
representative plants. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four 
hours). Mr. Ramseur. 

206. Plant Ecology. 

A study of the relation of plants to their environment, with emphasis on climatic 
and soil factors which influence their structure and distribution. Lectures, three 
hours; laboratory, three hours. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, four hours). 
Mr. Ramseur. 



62 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

301. Genetics. 

The course consists of a study of the principles of heredity of plants and animals. 
Lectures, three hours. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Owen. 

302. Histology and Microscopical Technique. 

A study of animal tissues; preparation and study of microscopical slides. Lectures, 
two hours; laboratory, four hours. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Yeatman. 

303. Evolution. 

A general study of organic evolution, including the history of the theories of evolu- 
tion, evidences of evolution, and theories of the mechanisms involved. Lectures, three 
hours. 1965-1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours), Mr. Owen. 

305. Plant Physiology. 

An introductory study of the basic physiological processes of plants. Lectures, 
three hours; laboratory, three hours. 1965-1966 and alternate years. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry ici-102. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Ramseur, 

307-308 and 309-310. Biology Seminar. 

A weekly meeting of the staff with Biology majors. Current literature and 
assigned topics are reviewed and discussed. Required of Biology majors. (Credit, 
one hour each semester). Staff. 

311. Genetics Laboratory. 

Offered concurrently with Biology 301. A study of heredity as illustrated by 
Drosophila. Laboratory, three hours. (Credit, one hour). Mr. Owen. 

316. Philosophy of Science. 

An examination of the assumptions underlying scientific discourse and of the 
meanings of scientific 'conclusions. (Credit, one hour). Mr. McCrady. 

320. Vertebrate Physiology. 

A survey of functional aspects of the vertebrate body, including a comparative study 
of homeostatic processes. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 101-102, Physics 101-102, Chemistry 203-204 (may be taken concurrently). 
Exceptional students may be permitted to take the course without all the prerequisites. 
(Credit, four hours). Mr. Foreman. 

321. Cellular Biology. 

A study of functional organization at the cellular and subcellular level, with 
emphasis on regulatory interactions between nucleus and cytoplasm. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 101-102, Physics 101-102, Chemistry 203-204 (may be taken concurrently.) 
Exceptional students may be permitted to take the course without all the prerequisites. 
(Credit, four hours). Mr. Foreman. 

401-402. Honors Course. 

Open to advanced students who have an average of B or better and show special 
aptitude for independent work. The number of credit hours is determined by the 
Department. Staff. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 63 

411. Radioisotope Techniques. 

Offered jointly with the Department of Chemistry. Lectures, two hours; laboratory, 
four hours. Approval of instructor required. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Owen. 



CHEMISTRY 

Professor Camp 

Associate Professor Guenther 

Assistant Professor Dorn 

Sewanee is one of the few small liberal arts colleges that offer an 
undergraduate program in chemistry that is approved by the Commit- 
tee on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society. All 
students who plan to become professional chemists are advised to com- 
plete this program, in addition to the minimum requirements for a de- 
partmental m^ajor. Such students should discuss their curriculum plans 
with the chemistry staff during their first year in college. 

Minimum Major Requirements: Chemistry 101-102, 203-204, 211- 
212, 303-304, 405, 409-410; Mathematics 201-202; Physics 101-102. 

Every Chemistry major must take a preliminary comprehensive ex- 
amination at the beginning of the fall semester of his senior year. The 
purpose of this is to help the student become aware of topics upan 
which he should concentrate in preparing for his comprehensive ex- 
amination. This preliminary comprehensive must be taken before the 
end of the second week in the semester. It will include material in the 
history of science. 

Requirements for a degree .approved by The American Chemical 
Society (in addition to minimum requirements listed above): (i) both 
French 201-202 and German 201-202; (2) two semesters of either 
mathematics beyond Mathematics 202 or physics beyond Physics 102; 
Chemistry 401, 403, and 404. 

French or German is the foreign language that a prospective chemis- 
try major should take his Freshman year. 

Chemistry 101-102 is a prerequisite for all other courses in chemistry. 

101-102. General Chemistry. 

An elementary study of the composition and structure of matter. Relationship 
and distinction between experimental data and theoretical concepts are stressed. The 
systematic qualitative analysis of inorganic material by the semimicro method Is 
studied in the laboratory during the second semester. Lectures, three hours; laboratory 
three hours. (Credit, four hours each semester). Staff. 



64 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

203-204. Organic Chemistry. 

A study of the nomenclature and the properties of the most important classes of 
organic compounds and the use of electronic concepts of molecular structure and 
chemical bonding. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four 
hours each semester). Mr. Camp. 

211-212. Quantitative Chemistry. 

This is a study of quantitative chemical measurements, their interpretation, and the 
chemical equilibria Involved. It combines some material from classical quantitative 
analysis with the physical chemistry needed to understand it. The mathematics of 
multiple complex equilibria is developed in detail. The relations of the free energy 
change to equilibrium and cell potential are stressed, and many equilibrium constants 
are determined by analysis in the laboratory. Two years of chemistry, and a knowl- 
edge of elementary physics and talculus are assumed. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, 
six hours. (Credit, four hours each semester). Mr. Guenther. 

303-304. Physical Chemistry. 

First semester: Thermodynamic and kinetic interpretation of some properties of 
matter. Second semester: Electrochemistry, atomic and molecular structure, reaction 
kinetics. Prerequisites: Chemistry 212, Mathematics 201-202, Physics 101-102. 
Permission may be given to exceptional students to take the course without all the 
prerequisites. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours 
each semester). Mr. Dorn. 

401. Qualitative Organic Analysis. 

The purification and identification of organic compounds, together with problem 
solving and the use of the library In work related to the laboratory assignments. 
Conference, one hour; laboratory, six hours. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Camp. 

402. Advanced Organic Chemistry. 

An intensive study of a few selected topics in organic chemistry. (Credit, two 
hours). Given 1965-1966 and alternate years. Mr. Camp. 

403. Inorganic Chemistry. 

Application of concepts of electronic configuration to Interpretation of physical 
and chemical properties of inorganic materials. Emphasis is given to spectra and 
crystal field theory of transition metal compounds. Prerequisite: Chemistry 303-304. 
Lectures, two hours; laboratory, three hours. Laboratory option by permission. 
(Credit, two or three hours). Mr. Guenther. 

404. Advanced Laboratory. 

Laboratory problems in a field of special interest to the student. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 303-304. (Credit, two to four hours). Staff. 

405. History of Science. 

A reading course required of all Chemistry majors. After consultation with a 
member of the Chemistry faculty, the student must (not later than April 30 of his 
junior year) submit a bibliography of references he plans to use and an outline of 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 63 

subject matter to be read. An outline of material studied must be handed in before 
the preliminary comprehensive examination, and a written and oral final examination 
taken not later than the first week following the Christmas holiday. (Credit, one 
hour) . Staff. 

409-410. Seminar and Honors Course. 

Open to majors; all seniors must participate in the weekly seminar for one hour 
credit per semester. Additional work may be elected in a research project with one 
of the staff. Credit to be determined by the staff. 

411. Radioisotope Techniques and Chemical Instrumentation. 

Given in cooperation with the Department of Biology. The major part of this 
course is devoted to a study of the applications of radioisotopes to chemical problems. 
During the latter third of the course, the principles and applications of selected 
chemical instruments are studied. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. 
(Credit, four hours). Mr. Dorn. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Professor Cheston 

101. Engineering Drawing. 

The use of drafting instruments), and introductory work in freehand lettering; 
the principles of orthographic projection, of dimensioning, of isometric projection, of 
oblique projections, and of perspective. Lectures, one hour; laboratory, two hours. 
(Credit, two hours). 

102. Plane Surveying. 

The use of surveying mstruments; plane-table surveying and mapping; use of 
the level and of telescopic alidade; transit surveying, and mapping from a transit 
survey; topographic mapping. Lectures, two hours; laboratory and field work, six 
hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 103-104 and Civil Engineering loi. (Credit, 
four hours). 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

Professor Turlington 

Professor J. H. W. Rhys 

*Mr. Binnicker 

Mr. Carleton 

The departmental requirements for a major in Classical Languages 
will be arranged in consultation with the Department Head. Students 



*0n leave 1964- 1965. 



66 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

contemplating such a major are advised that this University is a con- 
tributing member of the American School of Classical Studies In Athens 
and of the American Academy in Rome. 

A student accepted as a major in this Department will, at the end of 
his Sophomore year, be assigned a list of books and articles, including 
ancient authors and modern works bearing on the languages, litera- 
tures, and civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome. Part of the 
comprehensive examination will be based on these. 

Of the courses listed below, Greek 101-102, 201-202 and Latin loi- 
102, 201-202 are offered every year. All other courses are offered ap- 
proximately every alternate year. 

Classical Studies 

No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required for the following five 
courses. None of them can be used to satisfy any part of the foreign 
language requirement. 

101. Classical Mythology. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Carleton. 

104. Our Classical Heritage. 

Greek and Roman ideals and institutions whith have influence and continue to be 
basic in contemporary American civilization. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Turlington. 

201. Classical Etymology in English. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Turlington. 

204. Classical Literature in Translation. 

Selections from Greek and Latin literature in English translation. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Carleton. 

206. Greek Athletics. 

Athletics in Homer, the Olympic and other games of the Greeks, their gymnastics, 
their concept of athletics, and its place in Greek education. One hour of lecture 
and one hour of laboratory each week. In addition to the credit given for this course, 
attendance at both letture and laboratory can be used to satisfy the two weekly 
periods required for credit in Physical Education. (Credit, one hour). Mr. Turlington. 

207. Classical Archaeology. 

A study of selected sites of importance in the life and culture of classical antiquity, 
preceded by a review of four pre-classical tivilizations, including the Trojan, Cretan, 
and Mycenaean. Discussion is supplemented by use of slides and artifacts. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Rhys. 



the college of arts and sciences 67 

Greek 

101-102. Beginning Greek. 

(Credit, six hours). Mr. Carleton. 

201-202. Plato's Socratic Dialogues. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 

501-302. Homer. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

303-304. Greek Historians. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 

305-306. Greek Lyric Poets. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Carleton. 

307-308. Greek Orators. 

(Credit, thiee hours each semester). Mr. Rhys. 

311. Greek Prose Composition. 

Required of concentrators in Greek; open to other qualified students. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Turlington. 

401-402. Greek Tragedy. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). StaflF. 

403. Greek Comedy. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Rhys. 

411-412. Introduction to Linguistics. 

Required of majors in Greek; open to other students accepted by the Instructor. 
(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 

Latin 

101-102. Beginning Latin. 

(Credit, six hours). Mr. Turlington. 

201. Cicero. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Carleton. 

202. Virgil. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Carleton. 

301-302. Latin Historians. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 

303-304. The Lyric Poets. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 



68 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

305. Elegiac Poets. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Carleton. 

306. Roman Satire. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Carleton. 

311. Latin Prose Composition. 

Required of concentrators in Latin; open to other qualified students. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Carleton. 

401-402. Roman Drama. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 

404. Orations oi^ Cicero. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Turlington. 

405. Medieval Latin. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Carleton. 

411-412. Introduction to Linguistics. 

Required of majors m Latin; open to other students accepted by the instructor. 
(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 



ECONOMICS 
Professor Thorogood 
Associate Professor Degen 
Associate Professor Goodstein 
Mr. Walker 
Lecturer: Mr. Vaughan 
This Department seeks to provide instruction for students interested 
in understanding our economic society: its background and funda- 
mental principles, its problems and trends, its public and private eco- 
nomic institutions. 

Students majoring in this Department are usually preparing for ca- 
reers in business, law, teaching, or government. Many continue on 
to graduate schools in either economics or business administration, or 
in specialized fields such as international relations or industrial rela- 
tions. Those preparing for graduate work in economics or business 
administration are advised to study mathematics beyond the prescribed 
year course and to have some knowledge of calculus. Freshmen 
and Sophomores who expect to major in Economics are urged to con- 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES &) 

suit the Chairman of the Department as soon as practicable for the 
purpose of planning a desirable course sequence. 

A minimum of ii semester courses, or 33 semester hours, exclusive of 
Business Law, is normally required of a major in this Department. 
Four courses are prescribed for all majors: Economics loi, 305, 401, 
and either 301 or 306. Other courses are recommended on the basis 
of the student's individual interests and future plans. Economics 10 1 
is normally prerequisite to all other courses, but in exceptional cases, 
with the permission of the Chairman, other courses may be taken 
concurrently. 

All majors in this Department are required to pass a written com- 
prehensive examination. In addition to the written comprehensive ex- 
amination, an oral examination will be given to candidates for honors 
In Economics. 

Students may satisfy the social science degree requirement by taking 
Economics loi plus one 300 level course in Economics, or by taking 
Economics loi and a semester of Political Science. 

101. Introduction to Economics 

Essential concepts for understanding modem economic activity and economic issues 
involving public policy. (Credit, three hours). Staff. 

211. Elementary Statistics. 

An introduction to the theory and procedures pertaining to the reduction of data, 
statistical inference, the association of variables, index numbers, and time series. 
(Credit, four hours). Mr. Walker. 

212. Fundamentals of Accounting. 

The conceptual nature and general procedures of business accounting; transactions, 
accounts, the balance sheet, and the income statement; the accounting cycle. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Vaughan. 

213. Business Law. 

The main principles of business law: contracts, bailments, negotiable instruments, 
■common carriers, insurance, sales, wills, nature of legal remedies. How and when to 
seek legal advice. Also listed as Political Science 213. (Credit, three hours). Mr. 
Lancaster. 

301. Money and Banking. 

Historical and analytical study of the American monetary and banking system, with 
particular attention to monetary standards, commercial banking, the Federal Reserve 
System, and monetary theory. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Degen. 



70 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

304. Labor Economics. 

History of the American labor movement; labor-management relations; the labor 
market; the problem of unemployment; governmental policies and laws affectmg 
labor. Current Issues are emphasized. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Degen. 

305. Microeconomic Theory. 

The study of consumer, firm, and Industry behavior and the conditions of equilibrium 
In output and Input markets and in the economy as a whole. (Credit, three hours). 
Mr. Walker. 

306. Macroeconomic Theory. 

The study of economic growth, employment, and the price level. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Goodsteln. 

315. Industrial Organization. 

The study of alternative Industrial structures, their determinants, and their impact 
upon the attainment of the efficient allocation of resources, progress, stability, and 
equity In the economy. An Introductory survey of the current public policy toward 
the structure and behavior of Industry. Prerequisite: Economics 305. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Walker. 

321. American Economic History: The Character of Economic Growth. 

•An historical study of the character of American economic growth In terms of the 
natural wealth, human wealth, tapltal, enterprise, and markets contributing to it. 
Also listed as History 321. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Goodsteln. 

3?2. American Economic History: The Implications of Economic Growth. 

An historical study of the implications of American economic growth as regards 
economic fluctuations, the business society, condition of the people, natural wealth. 
International economic relations, and the role of government In the economy. Also 
listed as History 322. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Goodsteln. 

331. Public Finance and Taxation. 

Federal, state, and local tax systems In the United States. Purposes and effects 

of governmental expenditures. Budgets, debts, fiscal policy. Problems in Income, 

Corporate, estate, and property taxation. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Thorogood. 

332. Business Organization and Finance. 

Study of business organizations, especially the corporation, from the viewpoint of 
management, investors, and public. Problems of promotion, financing, expansion. 
Failure and reorganization. Stock markets; Investment banking; security regulation. 
Investment principles. Cooperatives and government-owned corporations. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Thorogood. 

337. International Economics. 

Historical, institutional, and theoretical study of international trade, finance, and 
the role of government in International economic relations. The position of the United 
States in the world economy Is examined. International economic Institutions, such 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES Jl 

as the International Monetary Fund, are analyzed. (Credit, three hours). Mr. 
Degen. 

340. Introduction to Mathematical Economics. 

The mathematical formulation of economic theory and a study of selected topics 
in economics drawn from among linear programming, input-output analysis, general 
equilibrium analysis, growth models, and econometrics. (Credit, three hours). Mr. 
Walker. 

401. History of Economic Thought. 

A study of the prmclpal schools of economic thougi.. and their development and 
inter-relationship. Medieval, Mercantilistic, Physiocratic, Classical, Utopian, Socialist, 
Neo-Qassical, and Keynesian Schools; a brief consideration of other miscellaneous 
schools of thought. Emphasis on Adam Smith, Ricardo, Malthus, J. S. Mill, Marx,. 
Marshall, and Keynes, (Credit, three hours). Mr. Thorogood. 

404. Seminar in Economic Development. 

A study of the revolutionary changes taking place in the underdeveloped areas of the 
world. Considers theories, policies, and problems of accelerating economic growth 
in Asia, Africa, ?ind Latin America. Ex:onomic, historical, political, and social factors 
are covered. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Degen. 

450-451. Tutorials. 

Advanced work for selected students. Three hours credit for a tutorial in a giveni 
area of study. Staff. 



ENGLISH 

Professor Harrison 

Professor Moore 

Associate Professor Martin 

Associate Professor Rhys 

Associate Professor Ramsey 

Mr. Arnold 

Mr. Corbin 

Lecturer: Mr. Lytle 

English 1 01 and one other semester of freshman English are required 

for the College degree. Credit will be allowed for either English loj 

or English 104, in addition to English loi and English 102. 

A student majoring in English will be required to take English 3 1 1-12 
and English 411-12. The comprehensive examination is divided into? 



72 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

seven fields. To qualify for graduiatlon, an English major must take 
the examination in five fields, one of the five to be Shakespeare. 

At the beginning of his senior year, an English major with an 
average of B or better may declare himself a candidate for honors. He 
will write an honors essay under the direction of the instructor of a 
seminar, and will take a one-hour oral examination in addition to the 
written comprehensive examination. 

Unless otherwise indicated, all courses meet three hours a week and 
give three hours credit each semester. 

101-102. Introductlton to English Literature. 

First semester: several playsi by Shakespeare. Second semester: Chaucer, Swift, 
Keats, one or more modern poets, and a novel. Themes both semesters. Staff. 

103-104. English Composition. 

English 103 is required of students who need elementary drill in writing. English 
104 may be elected as an alternative to Elnglish 102. Staff. 

201-202. Representative Masterpieces. 

European literature in translation. First semester: The Iliad, The Odyssey, Greek 
plays, Lucretius. Second semester: The Divine Comedy, Faust, Fathers and Sons. 
Staff. 

211-212. Modern Dramatic Literature. Mr. Rhys. 

301-302. Shakespeare. Mr. Harrison. 

303-304. Romantic Literature. Mr. Martin. 

305-306. Victorian Literature. Mr. Martin. 

307-308. Contemporary Literature. 

First semester: Contemporary Fiction. Mr. Lytic. Second semester: Con- 
temporary Poetry. Mr. Corbin. 

309-310. American Literature. Mr. Moore. 

311-312. For Junior Majors. 

Credit, one hour each semester. First semester: Theory of Literature. Mr. Ramsey. 
Second semester: History of English. Mr. Harrison. 

351-352. Seminar: Medieval English Literature. Mr. Rhys. 

353-354. Seminar: the Renaissance. Mr. Arnold. 

355-356. Seminar: Restoration and Eighteenth Century. Mr. Ramsey. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 73 

357-358. Seminar: the Novel. Mr. Moore. 

359-360. Seminar: Advanced Writing. Mr. Lytle. 

401-402. Seminar: English Literary Criticism. Mr. Harrison. 

411-412. For Senior Majors. 

Survey of English Literature. (Credit, one hour each semester). Mr. Harrison 
and Mr. Ramsey. 



FINE ARTS 
Mr. Barrett 

For students who are interested in Art but who ijitend to major in 
other fields, as well as for those who Intend to major In A'rt, the De- 
partment of Fine Arts offers integrated programs which provide a 
broad background in Art History, Theory, Criticism, and Creative 
Skills. 

These courses as they are related to the other Humianlties will enable 
students, and especially those who do not intend to major in Art, to 
enlarge their awareness of the visual arts and to develop an under- 
standing of Art land Architecture as related to the issues of contempo- 
rary living. At least one studio workshop course Is recommended to give 
students an opportunity to become acquainted with the basic creative 
principles of the visual arts. Such an experience in acquiring a basic 
skill can become the foundation for constructive hobbles throughout 
the remainder of their lives. 

For students who wish to major in Art, a comprehensive approach is 
emphasized. Technical skill In creative expression is developed through 
studio workshop courses in Freehand Drawing, Painting, Two and 
Three Dimensional Design, and Color. A variety of media and ma- 
terials are used to explore basic creative ideas and experiences. For 
every six hours of studio workshop at least three hours of Art History 
and Theory Is recommended. A minimum of 30 semester hours is 
required of a major In this department. By stating his preference for 
practical or theoretical art activities, the majoring student may con- 
centrate his efforts in either the Studio Workshop or the History and 
Theory courses. If the student chooses to specialize in History and 
Theory of Art, then he should take three hours of studio workshop for 
every six hours of History-Theory. In consultation with the Chair- 



74 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

man of the Department, pertinent related courses from the offerings of 
other departments will be chosen to complete his program. 

The work of the Department of Fine Arts is essentially non-voca- 
tional, but it does furnish a solid foundation for further study and work 
in both lart history and professional art careers. One of the depart- 
ment's major objectives is to help the student discover relationships 
in all phases of his experiences in the Humianities. Thu's he will de- 
velop and enlarge his awareness of the importance of independent in- 
sight, judgment, and understanding of worthy values. 

101-102. Art Appreciation. 

This course includes analysis methods which can open exciting fields for exploration 
and study of the structural and aesthetic principles of pictorial composition and design 
and their relationship to the other humanities in contemporary society. (Credit, three 
hours). loi. Explores Fainting and the Graphic Arts. 102. A continuation of loi 
and explores Architecture, Sculpture, and the Minor Arts. Mr. Barrett. 

Courses in Western Art History and Theory. 

A history of architecture, sculpture, painting and the minor arts, including analysis 
of the elements and prmciples of art forms, supplemented by examples from the de- 
partmental collection of slides and periodic exhibitions of professional art work in the 
University Art Gallery, which adjoins the Department of Fine Arts. 

103. From Prehistoric to Aegean Art. First Semester 1963-1964 and every three 
years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

104. Classical Art. The ancient art of Greece and Rome. Second semester 1963- 
1964 and every three years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

201. Medieval Art. From Early Christian to Gothic Art. First Semester 1964-1965 
and every three years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

203. The Italian Renaissance. From Trecento to Cinquecento. Second Semester 
1964-1965, and every three years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

301. From the XVII Century to Impressionism. First Semester 1965-1966 and 
every three years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

302. Modern Art. Second Semester 1965-1966 and every three years. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

Studio Workshop Courses. 

By selecting and using what seems best from various sources, these workshop courses 
are designed to guide the student in acquiring basic creative skills and experiences 
necessary in developing his art ideas, abilities, and understanding from merely curious 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 75 

interest to proficient creative expression. The Art major should take a minimum of 
six studio workshop hours and three hours of History-Theory per week each semester 
for a minimum of six semesters. 

155-156. Freehand Drawing. 

A beginning course in seeing, understanding, and drawing realistically simple still- 
life objects and casts, portraits, landscapes, and figure sketches in pencil, charcoal, and 
pastels. The fundamentals of freehand perspective and elementary pictorial composition 
are studied. Each class problem is used as a point of departure for more creative 
design experiments. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

157-158. Two Dimensional Design. 

The basic principles of two-dimensional design concepts are explored. Creative 
experiments are made, using line, shape, plane, color, and texture to express graphically 
an idea in flat or shallow space. This course is also an introduction to Advertising 
Layout. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

159. Experiments in Color. (Repeated each semester). 

These experiments enable a student to develop an easy familiarity with, and an 
understanding of, color and how to use it. The course consists of an analysis of 
color theories through a series of practical experiments using different media and 
tools. Although it supplements other related design and painting courses, no previous 
experience in art is necessary. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

161-162. Painting. 

The techniques of oil, water color, tempera, and pastels are explored through still 
life, portrait, and landscape assignments. The student learns how these problems of 
painting differ from those of drawing. At the same time he develops his own ability 
to express himself In terms of the limitations of the medium with which he chooses 
to work. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

251-252. Three Dimensional Design. 

Basic three-dimensional con'cepts of form and space relationships, structural funda- 
mentals, and chance forms are analyzed and graphically expressed. This course Is 
also an introduction to Architectural Design, Interior Design, and Sculpture. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

An Evening Community Art Class. (No previous art experience necessary). 

This class is open to all mterested members of the community and faculty. There 
is a charge of $io.oo for each person enrolled ea'ch semester. The class meets for 
three hours one evening per week (there are approximately 14 or 15 meetings) per 
semester. A limited number of interested University students may enter at any time 
at no charge. This is a non-credit course. Mr. Barrett. 



76 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

FORESTRY 

Professor Cheston 
Associate Professor Smith 
Associate Professor Baird 

Research Center Lecturers 
Mr. Mignery 
Mr. Burton 
Mr. Russell 
Mr. Smalley 

The four-year course of study leading to the degree of B'achelor of 
Science in Forestry is designed to provide the student with a thorough 
background in general education. Sufficient Forestry training is given 
the student to enable him to enter the field of Forestry or to do grad- 
uate work. Generous amounts of field and laboratory work are in^ 
eluded in the curriculum. 

The forest land of the University, of over 8,000 acres, is managed on 
a multiple-use basis for continuous hardwood production. Forestry 
students share in the problems encountered In a modern forest manage- 
ment program, and work out problems of forest land management. 

Complete utilization equipment is provided by a sawmill, a dry kiln, 
and a remanufacturing pliant including a moulder. Students see first- 
hand demonstrations and take part in logging, milling, drying, and 
manufacture of lumber. The Forestry department operates these fa- 
cilities for their educational value and for the benefit of the University. 

The Snowden Forestry Building and attached greenhouse, contain- 
ing 10,000 square feet of floor space, was constructed in 1963. All 
rooms are paneled in wood donated by lumbermen and friends of Se- 
wanee. Classrooms and laboratories are modern and provide an 
atmosphere especially conducive to the study of forestry. Of special 
interest in the display cases is the Lou Williams gavel collection; Mr. 
Williams of Chattanooga personally collected the woods from all over 
the world and made the gavels. The Nickey wood collectio|n of 8,800 
different wood samples is unique and classified and maintained in ma- 
hogany filing cabinets in its own room. It presents an unusual oppor- 
tunity for the wood technician to study exotic woods. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 77 

It is recommended that a student who plans to major in Forestry 
take the following courses: 

Freshman Year Sophomore Year 

Forestry loi Forestry 201-202 

Biology 101-102 Civil Engineering 101-102 

English 101-102 Economics 101-211 

History 101-102 English 201-202 

Language 101-102 Language 201-202 

Mathematics 103-104 Air Science or Physical Education 

Air Science or Physical Education 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Forestry 303-304 Forestry 401-402 

Forestry 301-302 Forestry 403 

Forestry 305-306 Forestry 404 

Forestry 307-308 Chemistry or Physics 

Religion or Philosophy 1 01- 102 Political Science 

Electives Elect ives 

During the spring recess of the Senior year, each Forestry student is 
required to perform intensive field work and prepare a written report. 
One hour's credit will be granted for this work. The cost of board and 
room for this period will be the concern of each student. The location 
of the forested area to be worked on may vary according to the needs 
of the students. 

During the last semester of their Senior year, Forestry students will 
accompany an instructor on a field trip to visit various forestry enter- 
prises of regional significance in the area surrounding Sewanee. Stu- 
de^its on this trip will ordinarily visit lumbering operationjB, national 
forests, and other points of particular significance to them. 

Special equipment needed by the forestry student during his course 
of study includes drawing instruments, triangles, scales, protractor, 
hand compass, clipboard, cruising axe, hand lens, wedge prism, and 
field clothes. 

Each Forestry major is required to spend summers engaged in 
practical forestry work in lieu of the common forestry school summer 
camp. This requirement may be replaced by formal training at 
any recognized forestry school summer camp. Practical summer work 
for the Forestry requirement can be satisfied by work with the Forest 
Service or at forest products industrial establishments. The Forestry 
Department will help a student obtain necessary practical summer 
work. These are all salaried positions. 



78 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

U. S. Forest Service Research Project 

The Sewanee Research Project, operated by the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, and one of several branches of the Forest Service's South- 
ern Forest Experiment Station, in New Orleans, Louisiana, works in 
close cooperation with the Forestry Department of The University of 
the South. Forestry students gain first-hand knowledge of forest re- 
search and participate in helping establish forest projects on the Uni- 
versity research forest. Technical forest research personnel are avail- 
able at all times to help the student with his forest problems. 

Work at the Sewanee forest management project emphasizes (i) 
soil-site relationships for pines and hardwoods, and (2) artificial re- 
generation of hardwoods. 

The major experimental areas are the 8,000-acre domain at The 
University of the South and the 2,600-acre Flat Top Experimental 
Forest near Birmingham. Studies are Installed on industry lands, 
state and national forests, and other public lands in central Tennessee 
and north Alabama. Sewanee research should benefit related highland 
regions throughout the South. 

101. Introduction to Forestry. 

A survey of the field of American Forestry with particular reference to Southern 
forests. Designed for potential Forestry majors. Only fir&t-year students admitted 
to the course. (Credit, one hour). Staff. 

201. Dendrology. 

A detailed study of the principal commercial forest trees of the United States, 
including tree ranges, principal uses, silvical requirements, and major identifying 
features. Identification of the trees and native shrubs in the vicinity of the campus. 
Lectures, two hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite: Biology 101-102. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Smith. 

202. Wood Technology. 

The identification of domestic woods used in lumber and wood products industries 
in this country by gross and minute structural characteristics. A study of the effects 
of the physical features of woods on their commercial importance, and a micro- 
scopic investigation of the elemental structure of wood. Lectures, two hours; 
laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite: Biology 102 and Forestry 201. (Credit, three 
hours) . 

301. Forest Fire Control and Use. 

Principles of fire behavior and effects. Prevention and control of forest fires. Use 
of fire in forest land management. Generally offered in alternate years. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Smith. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 79 

302. Forest Entomology. 

Fundamentals of morphology, physiology, and ecology of forest insects. Survey of 
the more important forest shade tree and wood product insect pests of North America 
with fundamentals of their control. Generally offered in alternate years. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Smith. 

303-304. Forest Mensuration. 

Principles, methods, and instruments employed in surveying forest land and in 
measuring the content and growth of individual trees and of forest stands. Includes 
an introduction to forest aerial photogrammetry and a timber cruise leading to the 
preparation of a forest management plan. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three 
hours. Prerequisites: Forestry 201, Civil Engineering 102, and Mathematics 103-104. 
(Credit, four hours each semester). Mr. Baird. 

305-306. Silviculture. 

Interrelationship of environmental factors and forest vegetation with emphasis on 
tree physiology; the fundamentals of soil science; theories and techniques of applying 
ecological knowledge to the control of establishment, composition, and growth of forests. 
Laboratory and field work on the University Domain. (Credit, four hours each 
semester). Mr. Smith. 

307-308. Wood Utilization. 

The harvesting and processing of forest products; the manufacture of lumber and 
of wood products; a study of methods and equipment. Field trips to forest products 
industries and to commercial logging operations on the University Domain. Use of 
economic approach. Generally offered in alternate years. Lectures, three hours; 
laboratory, three hours. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Baird. 

401. Forest Management. 

The application of business methods and technical forestry principles to the opera- 
tion of a forestry property. Prerequisites: Civil Engineering 102 and Forestry 201. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Cheston. 

402. The Seventeenth Century. 

Economic analysis of forestry activities. Appraisal and valuation of forest land and 
stumpage. Prerequisite: Forestry 401. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Cheston. 

403-404. Forestry Seminar. 

A study of topics not covered in the general forestry courses offered. Designed to 
acquaint students with the entire field of forestry and to allow them an opportunity 
for research into forest subjects of special interest. (Credit, one hour each semester). 
StaflF. 

405. Forest Economics. 

Principles of economics applied to the management of forest land and to the 

production, distribution, and consumption of forest products. Prerequisites: Economics 

lOi or the consent of the instructor. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Baird. 

406. Economics of Conservation. 

Renewable and non-renewable natural resources with particular emphasis on economic 
aspects. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Cheston. 



80 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

FRENCH 

Professor Buck 

*AssociATE Professor Bates 

Assistant Professor Jones 

Mr. Ling 

Mr. McCrady 

A major shall consist of not less than twenty-four hours selected 
from courses numbered 300 or higher. 

101-102. Elementary French. 

The phonology and basic structure of the French language. (Credit, six hours). 
Staff. 

201-202. Intermediate French. 

Intensive and extensive readmg of modern texts. Continued drill in pronunciaticai 
and oral expression. Prerequisite: French 102 or two years of French in secondary 
school. (Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

301-302. An Introduction to French Literature. 

A study of representative masterpieces from the Chanson de Roland to the 
present. Prerequisite: French 202 or equivalent. (Credit, three hours each semester). 
Staff. 

311-312. Composition and Conversation. 

Intensive exercises in the use of written and oral French. Reading and discussion 
of contemporary texts. Prerequisite: French 202 or equivalent. (Credit, three hours 
each semester). Mr. McCrady. 

401. The Seventeenth Century. 

Authors of the age of Henri IV and Richelieu, with emphasis on baroque poets, 
Corneille, Descartes, and Pascal. Fall, 1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Jones. 

402. The Seventeenth Century. 

A study of the classical authors of the age of Louis XIV, with emphasis on 
Mollere, La Fontaine, and Racine. Spring, 1965 and alternate years. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Jones. 

403. The Eighteenth Century. 

A study of the literature of the period of the Enlightenment, with emphasis on the 
thought of Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. Spring, 1966 and alter- 
nate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Jones. 

405. The Romantic Movement. 

A study of the major authors, with emphasis on Chateaubriand, Lamartlne, de VIgny, 



*0n leave 1964- 1965. 



I 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 8l 

Hugo, and Musset. Readings, lectures, reports. Fall, 1965 and alternate years. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Buck. 

406. The Realistic Novel. 

The fiction of Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, and Zola. Readmgs, lectures, reports. 
Spring, 1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Buck. 

407. The Late Nineteenth Century. 

The authors of the second half of the century, with emphasis on Leconte de Lisle 
and Baudelaire. Fall, 1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Buck. 

408. Contemporary Literature. 

The novel, poetry, and drama of the twentieth century. Readings, lectures, re- 
ports. Not offered 1964-1965. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Bates. 

409. The Renaissance. 

A study of the major authors, with emphasis on Rabelais, the Pleiade poets, and 
Montaigne. Readmgs, lectures, and short papers. Fall, 1965 and alternate years. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Jones. 

435-436. Senior Tutorial. 

Special Topics. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. (Credit, three hours each 
semester) . Staff. 



GERMAN 

Professor Whitesell 
Assistant Professor Lockard 

The minimum requirement for majors in German is 30 credit hours, 
including 311-312 and 405-406; those planning to continue the German 
major in graduate school should take 36 hours in the Department. 

101-102. Beginning German. 

Grammar and easy reading; considerable emphasis Is placed upon pronunciation and 
elementary conversation through the practice techniques of the language laboratory. 
In the second semester the study of grammar is continued, but special attention is 
given to rapid and exact reading of German texts. (Credit, six hours). Mr. Lockard. 

201-202. Intermediate German. 

Representative pieces of prose fiction are read and discussed. The primary 
emphasis is placed upon the exact understandmg of the German text. In the second 
semester a modern German novel and a piece of classical epic or dramatic poetry 
are read. Prerequisite: German 101-102 or placement test with a satisfactory grade. 
(Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 



82 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

301-302. Advanced Readings. 

Selected stories by Storm, Keller, Meyer, and Stifter are read and discussed. In 
course 302 one work each of Goethe and Schiller is read plus a modern novel. (Credit, 
three hours each semester). Mr. Whitesell. 

311-312. Intermediate German Conversation and Composition. 

Intensive conversational exercises and drill in colloquial idioms. Grammar review. 
Regular practice in composition at the intermediate level; part of the work in the 
second semester is based on current periodicals. The course is conducted in German 
and is required of majors. Prerequisite: German 201-202. (With permission of 
instructor may be taken toncurrently with 201-202). (Credit, three hours each 
semester). Mr. Lockard. 

401-402. Goethe's Life and Work. 

Faust, WertluT, Iphigenie, and Hermann und Dorothea are read entire in alass. 
Each semester one other major work of Goethe is assigned for outside reading. Pre- 
requisite: German 301-302 or consent of instructor. (Credit, three hours each semester). 
Given 1965-1966 and alternate years. Mr. Whitesell. 

403-404. Schiller's Life and Work. 

Die Rduber, Kabale und Liebe, and Don Carlos, together with the early poetry, 
are read in the first semester. Wallenstein, Maria Stuart, Wilhelm Tell, and the 
later poetry are studied in the second. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, three 
hours each semester). Mr. Lockard. 

405-406. Survey of German Literature. 

The history of German literature is studied from the begmnings down to the 
present day. Required of all majors. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. 
Whitesell. 



HISTORY 

Professor Grimes 

Professor Webb 

Assistant Professor Campbell 

Mr. Read 

Dr. Goodstein 

Students planning to major in History are urgently advised to take 
such courses as will satisfy the basic College requirements for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree during the Freshman and Sophomore years. 
Those planning to continue their study of History In graduate school 
are advised to select French or German as their language. The mini- 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 83 

mum requirement in addition to History 101-102 for any student ma- 
joring in the Department is eight semester courses and History 351- 
352. 

The comprehensive examination is a written examination which may 
he supplemented by an oral examination for those students who are 
candidates for honors in History. 

101-102. An Introductory History of Europe. 

Designed to introduce the student to the problems of modem civilization and to 
provide a background for courses in Economics and Political Science as well as in 
History. (Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

103-104. The Rise of the West. 

A survey of the history of Western Civilization, offered to selected freshman stu- 
dents. 1964-1965 only. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Grimes. 

201-202. History of the United States. 

A general survey of the political, constitutional, economic, and social history of 
the United States. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Webb. 

205-206. History of Enji,land. 

A general survey of the political, constitutional, economic, and sotial history of 
England and the British Empire since the Anglo-Saxon Conquest. (Credit, three 
hours each semester). Mr. Campbell. 

207-208. Russian History. 

An Introduction to major developments in Russian social and political life from the 
Kievan state to the present. Particular attention is given to the element of continuity 
and change between Czarist Russia and the present Soviet state. (Credit, three 
hours each semester). Mr. Read. 

301-302. Ancient History. 

The history of the ancient world from pre-historic times through the third 
century A.D. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours each semester). 
Mr. Grimes. 

303-304. Medieval History, 300-1300. 

The history of medieval Europe from the fourth to the fourteenth century, with 
special emphasis on social, economic, and religious developments. 1965-1966 and 
alternate years. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Grimes. 

305. The Renaissance and Reformation. 

The history of Europe during the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries, with 
special emphasis on the Renaissance in Italy and in northern Europe, the Protestant 
Revolt, and the Catholic Reform. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Grimes. 



84 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

306. The Reformation Era. 

The history of Europe from Luther's revolt to the Peace of Westphalia, with 
special attention to the interaction of religion and society. (Credit, three hours). 
Mr. Grimes. 

307. Europe in the Seventeenth Century. 

The history of Europe (excluding the British Isles) from 1600 to 1715, emphasiz- 
ing the religious wars, mercantilism, absolutism, the growth of the European states 
system, and the rise of modern science. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, three 
hours). 

308. The Revolutionary Era. 

A history of Europe In the eighteenth century, with particular attention to what 
is sometimes called "The Age of Democratic Revolutions" (i 760-1 800) and to the 
Frenth Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Read. 

309. Modern Europe, 1815-1914. 

A study of the internal development of the principal states, the problem arising 
from the Industrial Revolution, nationalism, and imperialism, and the origins of World 
War I. (Credit, three hours). 

311. Recent and Contemporary Europe. 

Modem Europe since 1914: the Internal development of the principal states, the 
Ideological conflict, economic nationalism, and the search for a system of collective 
security. (Credit, three hours). 

313. British Empire and Commonwealth. 

The history of the first and second British Empires, with particular attention to 
the commonwealth and the historical development of Canada, India, Australia, New 
Zealand, and South Africa. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Campbell. 

321. American Economic History. 

The process of thange In American economic society; the causes and effects of 
change, both economic and non-economic. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Goodsteln. 

324. Colonial and Revolutionary America. 

The development of institutions and ideas in colonial society. (Credit, three hours.) 
Mrs. Goodsteln. 

325. The American West. 

A study of the development of the American West and of the concept of the West 
in American thought. (Credit, three hours). Mrs. Goodsteln. 

227. History of the South. 

A study of Southern nationalism from the War of 181 2 to the First World War, 
with special emphasis on political, economic, and cultural factors. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Webb. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 85 

328. The United States in the Twentieth Century. 

A study in the political, social, and cultural response of American democracy to the 
problems of urbanism and industrialism at home and to the responsibilities of world 
conflict abroad. 1965-1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Webb. 

331. Diplomatic History of the United States. 

A survey of the diplomatic history of the United States from the American Revo- 
lution to the present, with special emphasis upon the historical evolution of American 
foreign policy in the 20th Century. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Webb. 

337. Seventeenth Century England. 

The political, social, and intellectual history of England from 1603 to 1714. Pre- 
requisite: History 205-206. 1965-1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). 

338-339. Problems in History. 

Advanced courses open to Juniors and Seniors only. Emphasis is placed upon 
individual work in consultation with the instructor. (Credit, three hours). Staff. 

351. Introduction to the Study of History. 

An Introduction to the methods and techniques of historical writing and research. 
Interpretations of modem historical writing. Required of all junior majors. (Credit, 
one hour). Staff. 

361-362. Intellectual and Social History of the United States. 

Selected problems in the development of American ideas and social structures, 
1 800-1960. Emphasis is placed on individual reports and class discussion. (Credit, 
three hours each semester). Mrs. Goodstein. 

451-452. Senior Tutorial. 

The course Is designed to acquaint the student with the major historians and his- 
torical philosophies through individual readmg under the direction of the Instructor. 
(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Grimes. 



MATHEMATICS 

Professor Bruton 

*AssociATE Professor Puckette 

Associate Professor Cross 

Associate Professor McLeod 

Associate Professor Johnson 

Dr. Alvarez 

The mathematics requirement can be Siatisfied by any two semester 
courses, with the exception of Mathematics 211. 



*On leave 1964- 1965. 



S6 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

All courses meet three hours a week and give three hours credit 
each semester. 

103. Analytic Geometry. 

The problem of association between an algebraic equation and a geometric curve, in- 
cluding the straight line, conic sections, transcendental curves, curves in polar co- 
ordinates, and parametric equations. Staff. 

104. Finite Mathematics. 

The study of finite sets and their relation to symbolic logic, vectors, matrices, and 
probability theory. Staff. 

] 51-152-153. Calculus and Analytic Geometry. 

A combined course for selected freshmen. It includes a thorough treatment of 
talculus, with the omission of functions of several variables. Staff. 

201-202. Differential and Integral Calculus. 

A thorough course In the calculus, including series, partial differentiation, and 
multiple integration. Prerequisite: Mathematics 103 or 104. Mr. Bruton. 

205. Integral Calculus. 

A continuation of Mathematics 203-204 given in 1963-64. Mr. McLeod. 

301-302. Advanced Calculus. 

A continuation of calculus, with emphasis on functions of several variables. 
Normally required of all majors in mathematics. Mr. Johnson. 

303. Theory of Numbers. 

An Introduction to the Integers. Includes the standard number-theoretic functions, 
properties of the primes, analysis of congruences, quadratic residues, continued frac- 
tions, Diophantine analysis, and twenty-three unsolved problems. 

304. Linear Algebra. 

An introductory study of linear transformations and matrices with applications. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 201 or 205 or permission of instructor. Mr. Johnson. 

312. Differential Equations. 

Properties of solutions of ordinary differential equations, introduction to partial 
differential equations, and applications to physical problems. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 202, 205, or permission of instructor. Mr. McLeod. 

313. Theory of Games. 

Finite two-person zero-sum games: mbced strategies, von Neumann's theorem, 
Kuhn's extensive form. Continuous two-person zero-sum games; distribution func- 
tions, the fundamental theorem, separable games. Finite n-person games: the von 
Neumann-Morgentstern theory and the Nash non-cooperative theory. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 87 

315-316. Geometry. 

Selected topics In various geometries, primarily from the point of view of the trans- 
formations allowed by the geometry. 

321. Probability and Statistics. 

A treatment of probability and a logical development of the framework of mathe- 
matical statistics. It includes sampling, estimation of parameters, hypothesis testing, 
and confidence methods. Prerequisite: Calculus. 

401-402. Modern Algebra. 

A study of the standard algebraic structures: groups, rings and ideals, fields, and 
integral domains. The second semester also includes field extensions and an in- 
troduction to algebraic number fields and Galois theory. Normally required of all 
majors. Mr. Cross. 

403-404. Honors Seminar. 

Selected topics. 

405-406. Honors Tutorial. 

Independent study in selected topics. 

409. Mathematical Logic. 

Same as Philosophy 409. Mr. Caldwell. 

411. Functions of a Complex Variable. 

An introduction to analytic functions, including the elementary functions in the 
complex plane, Cauchy's integral formula, Taylor and Laurent series, the residue 
theorem, conformal mapping, and analytic continuation. Applications to elementary 
mathematics and physical problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 302. Mr. McLeod. 

412. Functions of a Real Variable. 

Set theory, metric spaces, the Riemann-Stieltjes integral, preservation of properties 
under convergence, the Stone-Weierstrass theorem, and harmonic analysis. Includes 
an introduction to measure theory and the Lebesgue integral through the Riesz-Fischer 
theorem. Mr. Alvarez. 

421. Topology. 

A discussion of general topology, including non-metric spaces. Notions of compact- 
ness, connectedness, local compactness and connectedness, with emphasis on applica- 
tions to analysis. Prerequisite: Mathematics 202 or 205. Mr. Alvarez. 



MUSIC 
Assistant Professor Running 
Assistant Professor McCrory 

101-102. Music Fundamentals. 

A basic study of the art of reading music, learning to follow a printed score. A 
study of the signs and symbols of music to understand the basic patterns of rhythm 



88 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

and meter. Two hours a week. Music loi Is prerequisite for Music 102. (Credit, 
two hours each semester). Miss McCrory. 

201-202. Appreciation of Music. 

Designed to assist the student to listen to music appreciatively and intelligently and 
to familiarize him with the works of the great composers. Prerequisite 101-102 or 
the equivalent musical background. Music 201 is prerequisite to 202. One hour a 
week. (Credit, one hour each semester). Miss McCrory. 

209-210. Music Literature of the Baroque Period. 

A detailed study of the literature of the period, coinciding with the Festival of 
Baroque Music projected for the year 1965-1966. One hour a week. (Credit, one 
hour each semester). Mr. Runnmg. 

301-302. History of Music. 

A systematic survey of the course of musical history from the days of plainsong 
through the rise of the polyphonic, classic, and romantic schools to the present day. 
Music 301 Is prerequisite to 302. Three hours a week. (Credit, three hours each se- 
mester). Miss McCrory. 

401-402. Music Theory. 

A study of keyboard harmony, musical dictation, and basic harmony. Prerequisite: 
Music 101-102, or profitiency on an instrument. Three hours a week. (Credit, 
three hours each semester). Mr. Running. 

411-412. Introduction to Church Music. 

Historical background of the relationship of music to the Liturgy; hymnology and 
the use of music in the contemporary church. One hour a week. (Credit, one hour 
each semester). Mr. Running. 



Note: Membership in the University Choir and Band Is open to all qualified stu- 
dents by audition. Membership in the Choir or Band gives one hour of academic 
credit each semester; but credit may not be earned in both concurrently, and not 
more than four hours of credit may be granted in either or in a Combination of the 
two. Private instruction in voice, organ, piano, and some instruments is available 
upon request of the student. 



PHILOSOPHY 

*Professor Marshall 

fAssociATE Professor Caldwell 

Dr. Sallis 

The year-course requirement of Philosophy or Religion may be met 
by taking any two semester courses in the Department of Philosophy. 



*On leave first semester, 1964-1965. 
tOn leave second semester, 1964-1965. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 89 

All courses In the Department count towards the major in Philoso- 
phy, and students majoring must take at least 27 hours in the Depart- 
ment. Students planning to do graduate work in Philosophy are ex- 
pected to take additional courses in the Department including General 
Logic. The comprehensive examin*ation is both Written ajnd oral and 
Is taken in fields chosen by the student In consultation with the Chair- 
man of the Department. 

101-102. Introduction to Western Thought. 

An Introduction to philosophy through the reading of a selected number of philo- 
sophical classics. Open only to Freshmen and Sophomores. (Credit, three hours 
each semester). Staff. 

201. Plato. 

A study of Plato's dialogues, with emphasis on his influence in creating modern 
thought. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

202. Aristotle. 

A study of rep^-esentative works written by Aristotle and of Aristotle's influence on 
Western civilization. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

203. Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy. 

The philosophical significance of certain fundamental developments in modern 
mathematics such as non-Euclidean geometries, projective geometry, theory of groups, 
the real number system, set theory, and transfinlte arithmetic. No special mathe- 
matical knowledge required as a prerequisite. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Caldwell. 

204. General Logic. 

An Introduction to the principles of valid reasoning. (Credit, three hours). Mr. 
Caldwell. 

300. Philosophy of Science. 

An Investigation of the principles of the natural sciences. Methodology, the role 
of mathematics and logic, hypotheses, verification, concept formation, theory construc- 
tion, scientific explanation, the relation of science to other areas of knowledge. Pre- 
requisite: Physics loi and 102. (Credit, three hours). Mx. Caldwell. 

301. Existentialism. 

A survey of Existentialism as a philosophical movement conducted through a study 
of its origin In the writings of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche and of its contemporary 
forms in the writings of such philosophers as Heidegger and Sartre. Prerequisite: 
six semester hours of philosophy or consent of the Instructor. (Credit, three hours). 
Mr. Sallls. 

303. Philosophy of Law. 

The law considered from the standpoint of philosophical Ideas embedded within 
it. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 



90 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

305. Aesthetics. 

Aesthetic theory considered primarily in terms of Aristotelianism and Neo-Platonism. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

306. Contemporary Philosophy. 

A study of the major philosophical movements of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: 
Philosophy 101-102 or 307-308. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Caldwell. 

307-308. History of Philosophy. 

Philosophy from the Milesians to modern times, augmented by the use of source 
material. (Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

310. Kant and German Idealism. 

A study of the origin and development of classical German thought. Extensive 
reading in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, followed by a study of the development 
of Kantian thought in the works of such philosophers as Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel. 
Prerequisite: six semester hours of philosophy or consent of the instructor. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Sallis. 

314. The Philosophy of Whitehead. 

Alfred North Whitehead's philosophy studied in its relations to modern thought. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Caldwell. 

400. Cosmology. 

A general investigation of the problem of order. Emphasis is placed upon the 
metaphysical, epistemological, and axiological principles underlying the cosmological 
systems of Democritus, Plato, Aristotle, Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Newton, Einstein, 
and Whitehead. Recent discoveries In the foundations of mathematics and natural 
science and their relevance to a synthesis of conflicting principles of order. Prerequisite: 
six semester hours of philosophy or consent of the instru'ctor. (Credit, three hours). 
Mr. Caldwell. 

401. Ethics. 

Ethics investigated through selected problems. Papers are read and criticized in 
class. (Credit, three hours), Mr. Marshall. 

402. Philosophy of Religion. 

Philosophy of religion investigated through selected problems. Papers are read and 
criticized in class. (Credit, three hours). Mr, Marshall, 

403. Epistemology. 

Epistemology investigated by the examination of typical systems of the theory of 
knowledge. Papers are read and criticized in class. (Credit, three hours). Mr, Mar- 
shall. 

404. Metaphysics. 

Metaphysics Investigated by the examination of certain contemporary problems. 
Papers are read and criticized in class. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 9 1 

405-406. History of Philosophy in the 17th and 18th Centuries. 

The History of Philosophy considered in terms of selected philosophers. Papers are 
read and criticized in class. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Marshall. 

407-408. The Thought of St. Thomas Aquinas. 

The philosophy of Thomas Aquinas studied in the text and through his commenta- 
tors. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Marshall. 

409. Mathematical Logic. 

Propositional logic, predicate logic, set theory, the Frege-Russell-Whitehead logistic 
thesis, introduction to the foundations of mathematics. Prerequisite: differential 
and mtegral calculus or consent of the instructor. Also listed as Mathematics 409. 
(Credit, three hours). A^. Caldwell. 

411-412. Senior Tutorial. 

Individual study, with tutorial instruction. (Credit, three hours each semester). 
Staff. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Mr. Bryant 
Mr. Bitondo 
Mr. Majors 
Mr. Varnell 
Mr. Moore 
Mr. Carter 

All students must receive credit for four semesters of satisfactory 
work in Physical Education. The Director of Physical Education shall 
determine whether or not a student's work is satisfactory. A minimum 
swimming requirement must be met by all students. Exceptions: (i) 
students who are excused from physical activity by a physician, (2) 
students who are military veterans, (3) students in the Air Force 
ROTC unit, and (4) students excused by the Dean of the College. 

Until he has completed this requirement, each student must attend 
two scheduled periods each week of one hour In length. (Academic 
credit of one hour per semester is given for satisfactory work; maxi- 
mum credit, four hours.) 

Among the objectives of this program are: 

I. To develop an enthusiasm for playing some game well so that it 
may be enjoyed both in college and in later life. 



92 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

2. To develop agility and coordination of mind, eye, and body. 

3. To develop the .ability to swim. 

4. To grow in understanding and develop skills in maintaining 
physical fitness for daily living. 

The Director of Physical Education will offer instruction in various 
activities throughout the year. This is governed by the interest and 
need expressed by the students. Skills have been taught in the follow- 
ing sports: basketball, bowling, beginning swimming, golf, gymnastics, 
handball, swimming instructors' course, judo, karati, lifesaving, tennis, 
volleyball, weight lifting, and wrestling. 

The intramural program offers competition in: touch football, cross 
country, volleyball, basketball, handball, wrestling, badminton, track, 
Softball, tennis, golf, and swimming. 

Schedules are conducted in the following varsity sports: football, 
basketball, cross country, wrestling, swimming, baseball, tennis, golf, 
and track. 



PHYSICS 

Associate Professor Allen 

Dr. Ellis 

Dr. Rush 

Physics 101-102 is basic to all other courses in the Department. A 
major consists of at least eight semester lecture courses and one ad- 
vanced laboratory course, with Chemistry 101-102 and Mathematics 
201-202 as related courses. Students planning to do graduate work in 
Physics or Engineering are expected to take additional courses in 
Mathematics and are advised to acquire a reading knowledge of Ger- 
man. 

A student electing a major in Physics should take Mathematics 
201-202 as soon las possible, as these courses are prerequisites for 
courses numbered 300 and above, and are to be taken before, or con- 
currently with. Physics 203 or Physics 207. 

101-102. General Physics. 
Phystcs 101. 

Mechanics, heat, wave motion, and sound. Lectures, two hours; recitations, two 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 93 

hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite: a course in trigonometry in high school 
or college. (Credit, four hours). Staff. 

Physics 102. 

Electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Lectures, two hours; recitations, 
two hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite: Physics loi. (Credit, four hours). 
Staff. 

103-104. Introductory Physics. 

An introduction to concepts, methods, and theories in physics for students not in- 
tendmg to major in the physical sciences or mathematics. Lectures, two hours; 
recitations, two hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours each semester). 
Staff. 

203. Optics. 

A study of the fundamental principles of geometrical and physical optics. Lectures, 
recitations, and problems. Fall, 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, one hour). 
Staff. 

205-206. Intermediate Laboratory. 

This course affords an opportunity for further training and experimental study in 
physics. Laboratory, three hours. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, one 
hour each semester). Staff. 

207. Fundamentals of Electronics. 

Spring semester. (With laboratory; credit, four hours). Mr. Allen. 

301-302. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. 

Lectures, recitations, and problems. Prerequisite: Physics 102, Mathematics 202. 
Physics 305-306 must be taken concurrently. Required of majors. (Credit, three 
hours each semester). Mr. Allen 

303. Intermediate Mechanics: Statics (Mathematics 311). 

Fall, 1965-1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Staff. 

305-306. Advanced Laboratory. 

1965-1966 and alternate years. 305, Advanced electricity and magnetism; 306, 
Nuclear. (Credit, one hour each semester). Mr. Allen. 

307. Atomic Physics. 

This course includes the study of atomic particles, atomic structure, spectroscopy, 
x-rays, isotopes, and the photo-electric effect. Fall, 1965-1966 and alternate years. 
Prerequisite: Physics loi and 102; Mathematics 201 (may be taken concurrently). 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Allen. 

308. Nuclear Physics. 

This course includes the study of radioactivity, nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, 
acceleration and detection instruments and nuclear energy. Spring, 1965-1966 and 



94 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

alternate years. Prerequisite: Physics 201; Mathematics 202 (may be taken con- 
currently). (Credit, three hours). Mr. Allen. 

310. Thermodynamics. 

Not offered 1964-1965. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Ellis. 

401. Theoretical Mechanics: Dynamics. 

Prerequisite: Physics 303. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Rush. 

404. Theoretical Physics. 

Prerequisite: Physics 201, 301, and 303 and Mathematics 301, 302, and 312. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Rush. 

405-406. Senior Laboratory. 

Not offered 1964-1965. (Credit, one hour each semester). Staff. 

407. Seminar. 

Spring. All seniors must participate. Additional work may be elected with one 
of the staff. Open to juniors with permission of the department. Credit to be de- 
termined by the staff. 

410. Applied Mathematics. (Mathematics 410). 

Not offered 1964-1965. (Credit, three hours). 

Data Processing. 

A study of the fundamentals and application of modem computational methods 
using the electric computer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 103-104, (Credit, one hour). 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Dugan 

^Professor Lancaster 

Associate Professor Gilchrist 

Assistant Professor Keele 

Dr. Wells 

Students fulfilling the social science requirement by taking courses in 
the Department of Political Science are advised that any two semester- 
courses ,are accepted as fulfilling this requirement, and that any one 
semester-course in Political Science in combination with Economics loi 
will likewise fulfill this requirement. 



*0n leave 1964- 1965. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 95 

Students majoring in the Department of Political Science will nor- 
mally be expected to complete, by the end of the junior year, courses 
in American Government, Foreign Governments, International Rela- 
tions (any one semester-course), and Public Law (lany one semester- 
course). All students majoring in the Department are required to take 
the Graduate Record Examination as part of their written comprehen- 
sive examination. The written comprehensive examination (in addi- 
tion to the Graduate Record Examination) consists of two parts. Part 
I deals with Political Institutions in Theory and Practice and is re- 
quired of all majors. For Part II a candidate may take either a paper 
on Public Law and Jurisprudence or a paper on International Relations 
in Theory and Practice. 

Comprehensive oral examinations will include miajor courses, other 
courses, materials of the written comprehensive examination, and the 
bibliography of Political Science, including contributions of leading 
scholars in the field. Certain students not candidates for honors and 
certain students whose standing is clear as the result of all parts of the 
written comprehensive examination may, entirely at the discretion of 
the Department, not be required to take comprehensive oral examina- 
tions. 

In accordance with college regulations, a student majoring in the 
Department may take a maximum of 42 hours. 

Students majoring in the Department who intend to study law are 
strongly urged to take the Law School Admissions Test and to take 
courses in English History and Economics as soon as possible. 

101. American Government and Politics. 

A study of government and politics at all levels in the United States. (Credit, 
three hours). Staff. 

102. Modern Foreign Governments. 

The governments of England, Canada, France, Germany, Russia, and such other 
states as the mstructor may include in the tourse. (Credit three hours). Staff. 

104. State and Local Government. 

A critical exammation of politics and the operation of government at the state, 
county, and city levels in the United States. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Gilchrist. 

202. Contemporary Russia. 

A study of the revolutionary forces that have made twentieth century Russia. 
Emphasis is placed upon the direction of history, economic and political movements, 
and the bases of Russian foreign policy. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Wells. 



96 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

205. English Constitutional Development. 

A study of the origins of the English constitution and of its subsequent develop- 
ment, includmg the political and legal theory which accompanied this development. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Keele. 

207. Political Parties and Pressure Groups. 

The history, organization, and functions of political parties: the activities and im- 
portance of pressure groups and propaganda; the relationship between economic 
power and politics. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Gilchrist. 

213. Business Law. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the principles of business law; an 
approach to the law of contracts, bailments, negotiable Instruments, common carriers, 
Insurance, sales, wills; a study of the nature of legal remedies; information on how 
and when to seek legal advice. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Lancaster. 

221-222. History of European Diplomacy. 

A diplomatic history of Europe and the world, with emphasis on the period since 
1814, (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Dugan. 

301. History of Political Theory. 

The development of political thought In the West, with emphasis on the period 
since the sixteenth century. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Gilchrist. 

302. Recent Political Theory. 

A continuation of Political Science 301, with emphasis on late nineteenth and 
twentieth century thought In Europe and America; the relationship between sociology 
and politics, and the relationship between ethics and politics. (Credit, three hours). 
Mr. Gilchrist. 

304. American Political Thought. 

American political theory considered historically and In Its relationships with 
American history, American constitutional development, and American legal theory. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Keele. 

305-306. American Constitutional Development. 

The colonial background of the American Constitution; the forces that Influenced Its 
framing; Its development by formal amendment, statutory elaboration, judicial In- 
terpretation, and change in usage; the American adaptation of English common law 
and equity. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Keele. 

308. The Legislative Process. 

The composition, organization, procedure, and powers of legislative bodies in the 
United States and abroad; the study of standard classical works on the nature of 
legislation, such as those of Bentham; a consideration of modern theories concerning 
the nature and function of legislation. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Gilchrist. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 97 

321. Introduction to International Politics. 

I The European states system, and its worldwide extension; the balance ot power, 
diplomacy, international institutions; the importance of geography in international 
politics; the historical background of the world power conflict of today. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Dugan. 

322. American Foreign Policies. 

■ The conduct of foreign relations under the American constitutional and political 
system. The main lines of American interests in various areas, with emphasis on 
Latin America. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Dugan. 

r323. The Middle East in World Politics. 
(Credit, "three hours). Mr. Dugan. 

324. The Far East in World Politics. 

The Far East as an area of international conflict, with emphasis on the period 
since the building of the Trans-Siberian Railway. The interests and policies of the 
powers in the Far East, and the relationship between the Far East and other areas 
of international conflict. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Dugan. 

351-352. Principles of Political Science. 

A course in the general principles of the subject, intended primarily for junior 
majors. (Credit, one hour each semester). Staff. 

401. Political Science and Government. 

A comparative study of modem constitutions and of the main branches of government 
and main forces in politics in the modern world. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Dugan. 

405. The Constitution of the United States. 

The Constitution in law and custom, especially as it has developed since 1937. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Keele and Mr. Lancaster. 

406. Jurisprudence. 

Historical and analytical jurisprudence, with emphasis on the systems of England 
and America; a brief study of the philosophical, comparative, and sociological schools 
of jurisprudence; the judicial process. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Lancaster. 

421-422. International Law and Organization. 

The sources, subjects, and major principles of international law; the function of 
law in the international community; the League of Nations, the ideas underlying it, 
and its effect on international society; the United Nations Organization, and its limi- 
tations. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Lancaster. 

451-452. Tutorial. 

A course for specially selected senior majors and other specially selected senior 
students. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Dugan and others. 



98 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Associate Professor Lundin 

Psychology 201-202 is the basic required course for all advanced 
work in the department. Those students wishing to major in the De- 
partment of Psychology must take the following courses in addition to 
their work in the department: Biology loi, Philosophy 307-308. Fur- 
thermore, Mathematics 201-202 and Physics 101-102 are strongly ad- 
vised. For those students who wish to prepare themselves for graduate 
work in psychology, the above courses are miandatory. Most graduate 
schools in psychology require a reading knowledge of either French or 
German or both. In some cases Russian may be substituted for one 
of the above. 

201-202. Principles of Psychology. 

A survey of the facts and principles derived from the scientific study of behavior, 
both human and infra-human. Theoretical, and experimental findings in the fields of 
learning, motivation, emotions, perception, and individual differences are considered. 
201 prerequisite for 202. (Credit, three hours each semester). 

301. Personality Theories. 

Contemporary theories of personality are examined with reference to their structure, 
dynamics, and development. Major emphasis Is placed on the psychoanalytic theories 
of Freud, Jung, and Adler. Prerequisite: Psychology 201-202. (Credit, three hours.) 

302. Abnormal Behavibr. 

A study of the principles of psychopathology. Behavioral disturbances are ex- 
amined In the light of their psychological, biological, and cultural determinants and 
their relations to normal behavior. Prerequisite: Psychology 201-202. (Credit, 
three hours.) 

303. Social Psychology. 

The behavior of Individuals within groups, the Interaction of groups, and the effect 
of groups on Individual responding. The effect of society and cultural Institutions 
on group and individual respondmg. Prerequisite: Psychology 201-202. Not offered 
1964-1965. (Credit, three hours.) 

304. Tests and Measurements. 

A study of the variability of normal behavior as Indicated by various psychological 
measurements. A dlstusslon of the methods of test construction and their use, as 
well as some practice In test administration and interpretation. Prerequisite: Psy- 
chology 201-202. (Credit, three hours.) - 

401. Contemporary Theories and Systems of Psychology. 

The development of psychological theorizing from the late nineteenth century to 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 99 

the present day viewed In the light of its historical antecedents. The major psycho- 
logical systems of Behaviorism, Structuralism, Functionalism, and Gestalt psy- 
chology are examined as v/ell as some modem learning theory. Prerequisite: Phi- 
losophy 307-308 and Psychology 201-202 and one year of psychology beyond the 
Introductory level. Not offered 1964-1965. (Credit, three hours.) 

451-452. Senior Tutorial. 

Independent study of an experimental nature. The student will design and execute 
some kind of psychological experiment. For specially selected senior major students. 
Not offered 1964-1965. (Credit, three hours.) 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 
Mr. Marsh 

The College provides a laboratory course In speech, meeting In one 
two-hour session each week: exercise in diction and articulation; prac- 
tice In the delivery of extempore and prepared speeches. (Credit, one 
hour each semester). 



RELIGION 

Associate Professor Brettmann 
Associate Professor Collins 
Associate Professor Winters 

In addition to the courses listed below, qualified upperclassmen may 
take courses in the School of Theology for credit In the College, with 
permission of the head of the department. Credits earned in this way 
will not count toward a degree In the School of Theology. Students in 
the School of Theology may take the advanced courses listed below. 

101-102. The English Bible. 

A survey of the whole Bible In historical outline. First semester, the Old Testament; 
second semester, the New Testament. Open to freshmen and sophomores only. (Credit, 
three hours each semester). Mr. Brettmann and Mr. Collins. 

201-202. Biblical Thought. 

The distinctive ideas of the Bible traced In their historical development through 
the Old and New Testaments. Juniors and Seniors must substitute this course for 



lOO THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

the requirement in Religion. Prerequisite for ^phomores, one year of religion or 
philosophy. This course is not open to freshmen. (Credit, three hours each semester). 
Mr. Brettmann. 

203-204. Church History. 

The growth of the Christian Church from New Testament times through the pre- 
Reformation period, first semester; from the Reformation to modern times, second 
semester. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Brettmann. 

302. Christianity and Secular Alternatives. 

A comparison and contrast of Christian and contemporary secular attempts to 
understand metaphysical, ethical, and socio-political issues. (Credit, three hours). 
Mr. Winters. 

305-306. Comparative Religion. 

First semester: primitive and ancient religion; the religions of India and the Far 
East, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto. Second se^ 
mester: religions of the Near East, including Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Open 
only to Juniors and Seniors. Prerequisite: a year of religion or philosophy, (Credit, 
three hours each semester). Mr. Collins. 

309-310. Christianity and Western Culture. 

The mutual influence of Christian ethical ideals and the principal historical and 
intellectual movements of the West in shaping culture. First semester, from New 
Testament times to the Reformation; second semester, Puritanism, the Sects, and 
modern problems. Open only to Juniors and Seniors. Prerequisite: a year of re- 
ligion or philosophy. Offered alternate years beginning 1963-1964. (Credit, three 
hours each semester). Mr. Brettmann. 



RUSSIAN 

Dr. Wells 

101-102. Elementary Russian. 

This course is designed to give the student facility In reading, speaking, and under- 
standing 'contemporary Russian. He will acquire the fundamentals of grammar and 
will develop ability In translation and conversation on the elementary level. (Credit, 
six hours.) 

201-202. Intermediate Russian. 

A continuation of Russian reading, grammar, and conversation on the intermediate 
level. Some of the masters of Russian literature such as Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, 
and Tolstoy will be read. (Credit, six hours.) 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 10 1 

SPANISH 

Professor Pickering 

Assistant Professor Webber 

*Dr. Naylor 

Mr. McNab 

The requirement for a major in Spanish is five year-courses beyond 

I0I-I02. 

101-102. Beginning Spanish. 

The aim Is facility in conversation, mastery of essential grammar, and ability to 
read simple Spanish. (Credit, six hours). Staff. 

201-202. Intermediate Spanish. 

Training In Spanish conversation, reading, and grammar. Texts chosen for their 
literary value. (Credit, three hours each semester). Staif. 

301-302. Introduction to Hispanic Literature. 

A survey of the literature of Spain from the Foema del Cid to the present. First 
semester: the medieval period, the "renaissance", the siglo de oro prose — Cervantes. 
Second semester: Lope, Calderon and the siglo de oro drama, nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries. Either semester may be taken Independently. Prerequisite: Spanish 201- 
202. (Credit, three hours each semester). Air. Naylor. 

311-312. Hispanic Culture and Civilization. 

The history, traditions, and art of the Hispanic peoples. Course Is conducted mainly 
In Spanish and term papers are written In Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 201-202 
and some conversational ability. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Webber. 

401-402. The Spanish Classics. 

The Intensive study of several great authors and their works. Outside readings 
torrelatmg the authors studied to Hispanic culture. Prerequisite: three year-courses 
In Spanish, Including 301-302. 1965-1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours 
each semester). Mr. Naylor. 

403-404. Literature of the Golden Age. 

The most brilliant period of Spanish literature, studied In unabridged texts. 
Lectures and outside readings furnish background material. Prerequisite: same as for 
401-402. 1964-1965 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. 
Pickering. 

407-408. Tutorial for Majors. 

Choice of literary materials according to the special Interests of the students en- 
rolled. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Pickering. 

409-410. The Latin American Novel. 

Prerequisite: 301302 or equivalent. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. 
Pickering. 



*0n leave 1964-1965. 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



104 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

THE COLLEGE SUMMER SCHOOL 

In 1961 the University began operation of a coeducational summer 
term for undergraduates. The Summer School serves regular students 
in the University who desire to speed the acquisition of their college 
degrees or to gain additional credits toward completion of their class 
standings. Also, the Summer School offers an opportunity for edu- 
cational experience at Sewanee to men and women who are pursuing 
their college work elsewhere during the normal school year. An un- 
usually small student-faculty ratio in the summer makes possible an 
intimate classroom environment, and. In many Instances, instruction 
is practically tutorial. Such conditions often facilitate a smoother tran- 
sition from the .academic demands of high school to those of college. 

Incoming freshmen may wish to consider using the summer session 
to earn their degrees in less time than is normally required. It is quite 
possible for an above-average student to earn sufficient credits for 
graduation in three calendar years by attending two summer sessions. 
Students with lesser academic abilities may require three summer ses- 
sions to earn their degrees in the same time span. Scheduled increases 
in tuition and fees make this plan attractive In terms of money, as well 
as time. Student charges for Summer School are based on charges ap- 
plicable during the previous academic year. 

The physical environment of Sewanee is particularly pleasant in the 
summer months. Several small lakes scattered over the University 
Domain offer recreation in the form of swimming, boating, fishing, and 
biological observation. Many miles of trails through uninhabited 
woodlands are available for hiking. For students of scientific interest, 
the geology of the region, especially the Incidence of limestone caves, 
Is attractive. The University maintains on its campus a nine-hole 
golf course with bent grass greens. This facility, in common with the 
tennis courts and athletic fields, is available for use by students in the 
Summer School. Two excellent Inns, one located on-campus and the 
other a few miles ,away on the bluff of the mountain, cater to Sewanee 
residents and visitors. 

Summer residents of Sewanee enjoy weekly concerts of classical 
music by the faculty and students of the Sewanee Summer Music 
Center. Public lectures In the fields of theology and science are spon- 
sored periodically during the summer by the Graduate School of The- 
ology and by the Sewanee Summer Institute of Science and Mathe- 
matics (described elsewhere in this catalogue). 



the college summer school io5 

Summer Term 

19^5 

June 20, Sunday Dormitories open. 

June 21, Monday Registration 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. 

June 22, Tuesday Qasses meet at 8:00 a.m. 

July 16, Friday Holiday. 

August II, Wednesday Last day of classes. 

August 12, Thursday Summer School examinations begin. 

August 14, Saturday Summer School examinations end. 



1964 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

COURSES OF STUDY 



Biology 102s. Botany. 

A study of the basic fatts and principles of plant biology. The laboratory is designed 
to illustrate the principles of biology and to familiarize the students with the structure 
and function of plants. Lectures, five hours; laboratory, six hours. (Credit, four 
hours). Mr. Ramseur. 

Chemistry 101s. General Chemistry. 

An elementary study of the composition and structure of matter. Relationship and 
distinction between experimental data and theoretical concepts are stressed. Lectures, 
five hours; laboratory, six hours. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Camp. 

Economics 101s. Introduction to Economics. 

Essential concepts for understanding modern economic activity and economic Issues 
involving public policy. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Degen. 

Economics 211s. Elementary Statistics. 

The use of data for inference. Includes an introduction to probability, frequency 
distributions, the standard probability distributions, the central limit theorem, 
estimation of population parameters, and an introduction to correlation theory. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Baird. 

Economics 301s. Money and Banking. 

Historical and analytical study of the American monetary and banking system, with 
particular attention to monetary standards, commercial banking, the Federal Reserve 
System, and monetary theory. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Degen. 



I06 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Education 101s. Philosophy of Education. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Nunis. 

English 101s. Introduction to English Literature. 

Several plays by Shakespeare. Themes. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Rhys. 

English 102s. Introduction to English Literature. 

Chaucer, Swift, Keats, a contemporary poet, and a novel. Themes. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Moore. 

English 301s. Shakespeare. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Harrison. 

English 307s. Modern Poetry. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Rhys. 

Fine Arts 209s. Art Appreciation. 

This course mcludes analysis methods which can open exciting fields for exploration 
and study of the structural and aesthetic principles of pictorial composition and design 
and their relationship to the other humanities In tontemporary society. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Barrett. 

Fine Arts 217s. Studio Workshop. 

This course Is designed to guide the student In acquiring basic creative skills and 
experiences necessary In developing his art ideas, abilities, and understanding from 
merely curious Interest to proficient creative expression. Laboratory, 15 hours. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Barrett. 

French 101-102s. Elementary French. 

The phonology and basic structure of the French language. Each student will be 
expected to spend one^half hour in the language laboratory In preparation for each 
classroom recitation. The laboratory session should be considered an Integral part 
of the student's homework. Lectures, ten hours. (Credit, six hours). Mr. Lockard. 

German 101-102s. Beginning German. 

Grammar and easy reading; considerable emphasis Is placed upon pronunciation and 
elementary conversation through the practice techniques of the language laboratory. 
In the second half of the term the study of grammar Is contuiued, but special attention 
is given to rapid and exact reading of German texts. Each student will be expected 
to spend one-half hour In the language laboratory in preparation for each classroom 
recitation. The laboratory session should be considered an Integral part of the student's 
homework. Lectures, ten hours. (Credit, six hours). Mr. Whitesell. 

History 101s. An Introductory History of Europe. 

Designed to Introduce the student to the problems of modern civilization and to 
provide a background for courses in Economics and Political Science as well as in 
History. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Read. 



I 



THE COLLEGE SUMMER SCHOOL lOJ 

History 102s. An Introductory History of Europe. 

A continuation of History lois. This course may be taken concurrently with 
History lois with permission of the mstructor. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Read. 

History 215s. Greece: Ancient, Medieval, and Modem. 

This course is a study of selected aspects of the historical experience of Greece from 
the middle of the setond millennium to the present day. It is intended to provide a 
background for further study in Greek history, archaeology, literature, and Greek 
culture in general. It will also provide a background for travel in Greece. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Grimes. 

History 328s. The United States in the Twentieth Century. 

A study in the political, social, and cultural response of American democracy to 
the problems cf urbanism and industrialism at home and to the responsibilities of world 
conflict abroad. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Webb. 

Mathematics 103s. Analytic Geometry. 

The problem of association between an algebraic equation and a geometric curve, 
including the straight line, tonic sections, transcendental curves, curves in polar co- 
ordinates, and parametric equations. Prerequisite: trigonometry. (Credit, three hours). 
Mr. Cross. 

Mathematics 104s. Finite Mathematics. 

The study of sets and their relation to symbolic logic, vectors, matrices, and prob- 
ability theory. (Credit, three hours). Mr. England. 

Political Science 101s. American Government and Politics. 

A study of government and politics at all levels in the United States. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Wells. 

Political Science 104s. State and Local Government. 

A critical examination of politics and the operation at the state, county, and city 
levels in the United States. Special attention is given to government in Tennessee. 
(This course may be taken concurrently with Political Science lOis). (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Gilchrist. 

Political Science 202s. Contemporary Russia. 

A study ot the revolutionary forces that have made twentieth century Russia; 
emphasis upon the direction of economic and political movement; the bases of Russian 
foreign policy. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Wells. 

Political Science 207s. Political Parties and Pressure Groups. 

A study of the history, organization, and functions of political parties, and an analysis 
of the electoral process in general. A consideration of the activities and importance of 
pressure groups. Special attention will be given to contemporary politics, notably the 
Republican and Democratic National Conventions of 1964. (Credit, three hours). Mr. 
Gilchrist. 



I08 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Psychology 101s. Introduction to Psychology. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Nunis. 

Religion 306s. Comparative Religion. 

Religions of the Near East, including Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Particular 
attention will be paid to the contemporary problems faced by these world religions. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Collins. 

Spanish 101-102s. Beginning Spanish. 

The aim is facility In conversation, mastery of essential grammar, and ability to 
read simple Spanish. Each student will be expected to spend one-half hour In the 
language laboratory In preparation for eath classroom recitation. The laboratory 
seseslon should be considered an Integral part of the student's homework. Lectures, 
ten hours. (Credit, six hours). Mr. Webber. 

Spanish 201-202s. Intermediate Spanish. 

Training in Spanish conversation, reading, and grammar. Texts chosen for their 
literary value. Lectures, ten hours. (Credit, six hours). Mr. Pickering. 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 



no THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Admissions: Professors Gessell, Allison, Winters; Dean Alexander. 
Catalogue: Dean Alexander; Professors Gessell, Griffin. 
Curriculum: Professors Winters, Allison, Rhys; Mr. Merrill. 
Directors of Book Store: Professors Allison, Winters, Gessell, Ralston; 

Mr. Vaughan, Mrs. McCrady. 
Library: Professors Griffin, Winters, Woods, Ralston; Mr. Harkins, 

Mr. Camp. 
Scholarships: Dean Alexander; Professors Gessell, Rhys, Allison. 
Committee in Student Field Work: Professors Gessell, Allison, Rhys, 

Myers; Dean Alexander. 
Committee on the St. Luke's Journal: Dean Alexander; Professors 

Rhys, Winters, Ralston, Gessell; students S. Ross Jones, Everett 

F. Overman, Jr. 
Honorary Degrees: Professors Rhys, Woods, Ralston. 
Lectures: Professors Griffin, Winters, Allison. 
Long Range Planning: Professors Gessell, Rhys, Griffin, Allison, 

Woods, Ralston. 
Tutorial Program: Professors Winters, Ralston, Gessell, Allison. 
Music: Mr. Camp, Professors Woods, Ralston, Running. 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY III 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The School of Theology is a seminary of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church. It was established in 1878 as a constituent college of The 
University of the South with the status of a professional school, now 
fully accredited by The American Association of Theological Schools. 

Housing for married students has been provided by buildings erected 
by the Dioceses of Florida, South Florida, Upper South Carolina, Ala- 
bama, Louisiana, Atlanta, Arkansas, and by St. Luke's Church, Atlanta, 
and by Trinity Parish, Columbia, South Carolina. The Diocese of Ten- 
nessee and Miss Charlotte Gailor renovated and made available the 
Gailor Clergy House. The University, from income of the Louis W. 
Alston bequest, has provided five duplex units. All new units are of 
native sandstone. 

The library, with the WiUiam Welton Shearer Reading Room, con- 
tains some 27,000 catalogued volumes, files of diocesan journals, the 
General Convention minutes, and receives about 450 periodicals by 
subscription and gifts. The new University Library, located very near 
St. Luke's Hall, contains many theological books, manuscripts, and 
other historical papers important for research work. 

St. Luke's Chapel, erected in memory of the Rev. Telfair Hodgson, 
D.D., LL.D., a former Vice-Chancellor of the University and Dean of 
the School of Theology, was the gift of his family. Theological stu- 
dents, faculty, and their families worship also, from time to time, in 
All Saints' Chapel, the University Chapel, and in Otey Memorial Parish 
Church. 

St. Luke's Book Store is operated by the school under the supervision 
of a board of directors. All textbooks are ordered through the book 
store at a discount. A stock of recommended books is maintained for 
theological students and clergy. Mail service is given to clergy and 
alumni of the University. 

The Frank A. Juhan Gymnasium, with swimming pool and bowling 
alleys, and adjacent indoor tennis courts, is available to all students, 
and students participate in an active program of intramural athletics. 

PRE-SEMINARY STUDIES 

The School of Theology recommends the following as presented by 
the American Association of Theological Schools*: 



*A full statement on pre-seminary studies may be secured from the American 
Association of Theological Schools, 934 Third National Building, Dayton, Ohio, 45402. 



112 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

College courses prior to theological seminary should provide the cul- 
tural and intellectual foundations essential to an effective theological 
education. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result 
in the ability to write and speak English clearly and correctly, the 
ability to think clearly as cultivated through courses in philosophy, 
logic, science, and the ability to read at least one foreign language. 

The college work of a pre-seminary student should give him an un- 
derstanding of the world in which he lives, the world of men and ideas, 
the world of nature, and the world of human affairs. 

With reference to the practical problem of selecting courses, it is sug- 
gested that the pre-seminary student should take 30 semester courses 
or 90 semester hours, or approximately three-fourths of his college 
work in the following areas: English (literature, composition, speech, 
related studies), history (ancient, modern European, American), phi- 
losophy, natural sciences (preferably physics, chemistry, biology), so- 
cial sciences, foreign languages, and religion (especially a thorough 
knowledge of the English Bible). 



ADMISSION, REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION 
OF STUDENTS 

Applicants for admission to the School of Theology must be graduates 
of an accredited college. In special cases, prospective students with- 
out the B.A. degree may satisfy the faculty that they are adequately 
equipped to meet the school's standard of studies. Procedure for 
application Is as follows: 

1. Applicants shall have taken the General Aptitude Test of the 
Graduate Record Examination given by the Educational Testing 
Service.* 

2. The standard application form, available on request from the 
office of the Dean, must be submitted. 

3. All college transcripts shall be forwarded. 

4. A personal Interview at the School of Theology Is expected. In 
special circumstances the Dean may appoint a nearby presbyter to 
represent the school in this. 



*Full information may be obtained from the Graduate Record Examination, Edu- 
cational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, or 4640 Holly^vood Blvd., Los 
Angeles 27, California. A limited number of application forms for the examination 
can be supplied by the Dean's office upon request. 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY II3 

After an applicant Is accepted by the Admissions Committee, a pre- 
registratlon fee of ^25.00 should be sent to the Dean's Office, payable 
to the Treasurer of The University of the South. This fee will be 
credited to the following semester's expenses. 

Students in the School of Theology are permitted to take two courses 
in any semester in the undergraduate college of the University without 
further payment of fees; if more than two courses are taken, the 
college tuition fee is required. 

Regular Students are those who pursue the prescribed courses of the 
school. 

1. Those regular students who have a B.A. degree, or an equivalent 
bachelor's degree, and pursue the study of the New Testament in 
Greek may become candidates for the B.D. degree. 

2. Those regular students who have a B.A. degree, or an equivalent 
bachelor's degree, and are dispensed by their Bishops from the study 
of Greek may become candidates for the Licentiate in Theology. 

3. Those regular students who do not have a bachelor's degree may 
become candidates for the Licentiate in Theology by pursuing either the 
Greek or English course. 

Special Students are those who, under appointment by their Bishops 
and under direction of the Dean and the faculty, pursue selected studies 
no(t directed toward graduation. 

Graduate Students are those who have their B.D. degree and are 
seeking the S.T.M. degree. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for graduation are the successful completion of all 
required and elective courses as outlined on page 118 and the award- 
ing of the degree or licentiate by the Senate of the University, on 
nomination by the Faculty in Theology. The faculty Is required by 
the Canons of the Church to be concerned not only with the academic 
proficiency of the student but also with his personal qualifications for 
the ministry. 

Licentiate in Theology 

Regular students who pass all prescribed work in either the Greek or 
the English course are eligible for the award of Licentiate in Theology. 



8 



114 the university of the south 

Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 
A regular student who has passed all the prescribed work and met the 
following conditions is eligible to be awarded the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity : 

1. He must hold a bachelor's degree from an approved college. 

2. He must have studied the New Testament courses with the use of 
the Greek language. 

3. He must have maintained a C (2.00) average. 

4. Unless his average is B or above, he must have passed a compre- 
hensive examination with a grade of C or better. 

5. He must have passed a Bible content examination in Old Testa- 
ment and New Testament. 

6. He must have fulfilled the clinical pastoral training requirement. 

Licentiate or Degree optime merens 

Any student who at the end of the Middler Year has earned an .aver- 
age grade of 3.75 may apply to the faculty for permission to write a 
thesis in one of the five fields of study, under the direction of the 
appropriate professor. Application should be m,ade to the faculty by 
November i, and the thesis subject should be submitted, with approval 
of the professor concerned, by December i. The final draft of the 
thesis must be submitted by April 15. If the thesis is satisfactory and 
the candidate has maintained the 3.75 average, he may receive the Li- 
centiate in Theology or the degree of Bachelor of Divinity, optime 
merens. 

Degree of Master of Sacred Theology* 

1. An applicant for the Master of Sacred Theology degree must pos- 
sess the degree of Bachelor of Divinity or similar degree (Th.B. or 
S.T.B.). 

2. An applicant must show a reading proficiency in languages requi- 
site for his course of study before being accepted as a candidate for the 
S. T. M. degree. 

3. An applicant may be asked to take the Aptitude Test of the 
Graduate Record Examination preceding the academic year in which 



*See Graduate School of Theology, page 128, for requirements In the summer session. 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY II5 

he plans to begin his work and may be asked to take a qualifying 
examination. 

4. The candidate must successfully complete the equivalent of one 
full year of graduate study beyond the B.D. degree. Normally this will 
be 6 units of work in course, 4 of which are in a major field*; and an 
acceptable project or paper in this major field of study. The proposed 
project or paper must be approved by the faculty. Upon presentation 
of three finished copies of the project report or paper, the candidate 
will be examined orally on it. Two of these approved copies for which 
a $5.00 binding fee is charged will be placed in the Library. 

5. The candidate must maintain a B (3.00) average and pass a com- 
prehensive examination in his major field. 

6. One year of academic residence is expected of the candidate, and 
work for the degree is expected to be completed within three years after 
matriculation. 

Hoods 

The hoods of the degrees conferred on the recommendation of the 
faculty of the School of Theology are of Oxford shape, single, all with 
purple cord cutting the colors. The hood of the Licentiate in Theology 
is black, lined with white with a four inch purple chevron and is three 
feet in its greatest dimension. The hood of the Bachelor of Divinity 
is black, lined with scarlet, and is three feet in its greatest dimension. 
The hood of the Master of Sacred Theology is blue, lined with scarlet, 
and is three feet, six inches in its greatest dimension. 

CURRICULUM 

Greek 

In accordance with Canon 29 on the normal standard of learning for 
Candidates for Holy Orders, it is expected that the student will study 
the required New Testament courses with the use of the Greek lan- 
guage. Applicants for admission to the School of Theology are there- 
fore encouraged to prepare themselves in Greek before entering the 
seminary. 

Beginning students who can give evidence of their ability to read 
the New Testament in Greek will be assigned additional Greek reading 
with a review of elementary Greek. 



*A unit is understood to be the equivalent of three hours of course work. 



Il6 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

All beginning students not so prepared will be required to participate 
in a two-week accelerated course in Greek, whether or not they are 
dispensed from canonical examinations in the Greek New Testament. 

Dean^s Conference for Juniors 
"The Dean's Conference" for Juniors is held one hour each week 
throughout the year and offers an opportunity for careful consideration 
of the meaning of vocation, prayer and meditation, theological educa- 
tion, and life in the school. 

Church Music 
The students of the School of Theology are required to become famil- 
iar with the fundamentals of music and voice production with emphasis 
on the music of the Church as found in the Hymnal 1940, the Psalter, 
and the Choral Service. 

Clinical Pastoral Training* 
Clinical pastoral training under approved supervision during the 
summer following the Junior Year is required for the degree or licenti- 
ate. The program of clinical pastoral training is conducted by accredited 
chaplain supervisors in accredited institutions such as mental hospitals, 
general hospitals, penal and correctional centers, research centers, and 
clinics. The program seeks to deepen the student's understanding of 
himself in his vocation through involvement in and evaluation of pas- 
toral relationships and for the development of Christian faith. The 
program focuses on the experience of the student in the context of a 
pastoral situation under the dynamics of supervision. The purpose of 
pastoral training is to /affcrd the student a learning situation in pastoral 
care and a dialogue between the several theological disciplines and his 
own life. It is expected that this dialogue, going on both within the 
student and between students, will help to clarify in practice the re- 
sources, methods, and meaning of religion as these are expressed 
through pastoral care. 

MiDDLER Tutorial 
The Middler Tutorial establishes an educational context in which 
widely divergent subjects relevant to the theological disciplines and to 
the individual interests of the student may be explored. The setting 



*See also page 125. 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY ILJ 

provides weekly occasions in which the student may examine deeply 
his own religious concerns within their life context. He works in the 
discipline of dialogue with his Tutor and a fellow student toward the 
integration and enlargement of his understanding of areas of theologi- 
cal study, and toward the relating of his total seminary experience to 
his personal role in the Christian mission. 

Examination in the Content of Holy Scripture 
During the Middler Year, written examinations in the content of the 
EngHsh Bible will be given. Every student is required to pass these 
examinations before his graduation. 

Special Students from Other Ministries 
A program for men transferring from the ministry of other com- 
munions to the ministry of the Episcopal Church and enrolHng as either 
Special or Graduate students will be arranged by consultation with 
faculty advisors. This program will include courses offered in English 
and American Church History; Ecclesiastical Pohty and Canon Law; 
Theology; the History, Content, and Use of the Book of Common 
Prayer; Ethics and Moral Theology. 



ii8 



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 



OUTLINE OF REQUIRED COURSES* 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Field First Semestee Hours Field 

OT I— Old Testament 3 OT 

NT I— New Testament 3 NT 

Greek -—Elementary Greek 3 ST 

ST i—Introd. to Theology ... 3 CH 

PT I— Lit., The Prayer Book . 3 FT 

Church Music — 

Dean's Conference i 

ainical Pastoral Traming, summer 2 hrs. 



Second Semester Hours 

2 — Old Testament 3 

2 — Synoptic Gospels 3 

2 — Dogmatic Theology .... 3 
2 — General Church History. 3 
2 — Introd. to Pastoral Theol. 3 

Church Music i 

Dean's Conference i 



MIDDLER YEAR 

OT 3 — Later Judaism 3 NT 

NT 3 — ^Johannine Literature ... 3 ST 

ST 3 — Dogmatic Theology 3 CH 

CH 3— General Church History 3 PT 

PT 3— Pastoral Care, Hom. ... 3 

Church Music — 

MIddler Tutorial i 



4 — Pauline Epistles 3 

4 — Ethics 3 

4 — Eng. Ch. History 3 

4 — Christ. Ed. & Hom 3 

Elective 2 

Church Music — 

MIddler Tutorial i 







SENIOR 


YEAR 


ST 


5— Moral Theology . 


3 


ST 


CH 


S— Am. Ch. Hist. . . . , 


2 


CH 


PT 


5 — ^Homlletics 


3 


PT 




Elective 


2 






Elective 


2 


PT 




Church Music 







6 — Christian Apologetics . . 3 

6 — Missions 2 

6 — Parish Adm. & Canon 

Law 3 

8 — Lit., Christian Worship . 3 

Elective 2 

Elective 2 

Church Music — 



*Certain courses may be shifted from normal positions to provide for sabbatical 
leaves. Total required hours are 93, seven of which are in ungraded courses. 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY II9 

A DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

The courses of study are divided into five major fields: Old Testa- 
ment, New Testament, Systematic Theology, Church History, and 
Pastoral Theology. Required courses are numbered from i through 
8; electives are numbered from ii onward. 

The unit by which courses are measured and according to which 
credit is given is the semester-hour. By a semester-hour is meant 
attendance at class one hour per week for one semester. Quality points 
are determined in accordance with the number of hours credit 
allotted for each course in which a grade is given; thus "A" equals 4 
X semester hours, "B" = 3 x semester hours, "C" = 2 x semester hours, 
etc. 

Old Testament Field 

O. T. 1-2. Old Testament History and Literature. 

A survey of the content and underlying motifs of the Old Testament in the light 
of literary, historical, and form criticism. Three hours, two semesters. Required of 
Juniors. [Mr. Griffin.] 

O. T. 3. The History and Literature of Later Judaism. 

A survey of the content and theology of the Apocrypha, Pseudepigrapha, and Dead 
Sea Scrolls. Three hours, one semester. Required of Middlers. [Mr, Griffin.] 

All Old Testament elective courses require the Dermission of the 
instructor for enrollment. 

O. T. n. Religion of the Old Testament. 

A study of the leading religious ideas of the Old Testament. Two hours, one se- 
mester. Elective. [Mr. Griffin.] 

O. T. 12. Selected Courses in English Exegesis of particular books as announced» 
[Prerequisite: O. T. 1-2] 

Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Griffin.] 

O. T. 13-14. Elementary Hebrew. 

An introduction to the grammar and syntax of the Hebrew Bible, with readings ra 
Genesis. A year course, three hours each semester. Elective. [Mr. Griffin.] 

O. T. 15-16. Advanced Hebrew. 

Progressively advanced readings in the Hebrew Bible with emphasis upon methods 
of exegesis. Two hours, two semesters. Elective. [Mr. Griffin.] 



New Testament Field 

Greek. A complete exposition of Greek Grammar, without reading and with limited 
vocabulary, given in the two weeks before the regular academic year opens. Some 



I20 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

forty hours of class work are involved. The course is required of all Juniors who are 
not able to pass an examination in Greek reading and of degree candidates in other 
years who have not yet fulfilled this requirement. The use of the Greek language is 
Indispensable for the complete understanding of New Testament study. During the 
first semester the grammar classes will be repeated for those students in need of further 
training, including some reading from the Greek New Testament. Credit, three hours. 
[Messrs. Rhys, Turlington.] 

N. T. 1. New Testament Introduction. 

A study of the geography of Palestine, of the historical background and development 
of Judaism, and of the thought and religion of the ancient world as this affected early 
Christianity; a brief survey of the New Testament writings and of the other Christian 
literature before A.D. 150; a review of the questions of canon and text; and an analysis 
of the principles of literary and historical criticism. There is also some reading 
In Greek New Testament. Three hours, one semester. Required of Juniors. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N. T. 2. The Synoptic Gospels. 

Readings from the three synoptic gospels, with special emphasis on that of Matthew, 
and a historical reconstruction of the ministry of Jesus. Three hours, one semester. 
Required of Juniors. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N. T. 3. Johannlne Literature. 

The Fourth Gospel will be studied in exhaustive detail, and other documents 
considered in relation thereto. The Jewish, Oriental, and Hellenistic contributions to 
Christian thought will be considered, including the problems of Gnosticism, and the 
Dead Sea Scrolls. Three hours, one semester. Required of Middlers. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N. T. 4. Epistles of St. Paul. 

Romans will be read, together with sections of Philippians and Colossians, In 
order to outline the Apostle's contribution to Christian thought. Three hours, one 
semester. Required of Middlers. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N. T. 11. Sin and Redemption In the New Testament. 

A study of the relevant sections of the various New Testament documents for an 
understanding of the basis of the doctrine of the Atonement. This is an introduction 
to Biblical Theology and a survey of its central theme. Two hours, one semester. 
Elective. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N. T. 12. The Epistle to the Epheslans. 

An Intensive study of this Epistle in the light of research, with consideration of its 
place in Christian history. Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N. T. 13-14. The Acts of the Apostles. 

An intensive study of the early history of Christianity and the life of St. Paul as 
revealed in this document, with investigation of the varying traditions found therein. 
Two hours in each of two semesters. Elecitive. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N. T. 15. The Pastoral Epistles. 

A study of the authorship, background, and meaning of the three Epistles. Two 
hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Rhys.] 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 121 

N. T. 16. Epistles to the Hebrews. 

A study of the date, background, and purpose of this Epistle, with reference to prior 
theories on these points and translation and analysis of the text. Two hours, one 
semester. Elective. [Mr. Rhys.] 

N. T. 18. Research Seminar for S.T.M. candidates. 

A reading course with topic determined by arrangement between student and in- 
sitructor. Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Rhys.] 



Systematic Theology Field 

S. T. 1. Introduction to Theology. 

A lecture and discussion course designed to help the student raise the basic 
questions with which Christian theology is concerned, and to acquaint him with some 
of the more important philosophical terms and concepts. Three hours, one semester. 
Required of Juniors. [Messrs. Winters, Myers.] 

S. T. 2-3. The Articulation of Christian Doctrine. 

A lecture, reading, and discussion course. The student is expected to read the 
essentials of traditional Christian doctrine and on the basis of this to engage in theo- 
logical dialogue with his classmates under the guidance of the instructor. A parallel 
series of lectures is given as an example of the theological process. Three hours in 
each of two semesters. Required of Juniors and Middlers. [Mr. Winters.] 

S. T. 4-5. Moral Theology. 

A consideration of the moral nature of man as it has been understood in Christian 
theological tradition, with reference to the principal systems of ethics and moral 
philosophy; and an exposition of the principles in terms of which the Christian idea of 
the supernatural end of man is brought to bear upon specific cases of conscience. 
Three hours, in each of two semesters. Required of Middlers and Seniors. [Mr. 
Ralston.] 

S. T. 6. Christian Apologetics. 

An interdepartmental seminar attempting to correlate doctrinal, ethical, and pastoral 
contems in the presentation of the Christian faith to the world. Three hours, one 
semester. Required of Seniors. [Messrs. Ralston, Winters, and Myers.] 

*S. T, 11. Doctrinal Seminar. 

A major doctrine is considered in detail each year. Two hours, one semester. 
Elective. [Mr. Winters.] 

S. T. 12. Advanced Theology Seminar. 

A continuation of the theological dialogue begun in S. T. 2-3, centering around the 
thought of a theologian selected by the members of the seminar. Two hours, one 
semester. Elective. [Mr. Winters.] 



*Not offered in 1964-65. 



122 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

S. T. 13-14. Patristics. 

A seminar in the Christian thought of the patristic period; basic writings of classical 
Christian thinkers from the Apostolic Fathers to St. Augustine. Two hours in each 
of two semesters. Credit will be given for either semester separately. Elective. [Mr. 
Woods.] 

S. T. 15. The Anglican Tradition in Theology. 

A descriptive analysis of the history of Anglican theory through the end of the 
nmeteenth century, and an attempt to assess the value of its particular character and 
methods. Two hours, one semester. Elettive. [Mr. Ralston.] 

*S. T. 16. Anglican Apologetics in the Twentieth Century. 

Lectures and seminars. A study of the major issues in recent and contemporary 
theology as they have been reflected within Anglicanism. Two hours, one semester. 
Elective. [Mr. Ralston.] 

*S. T. 17. The Mystical Element of Religion. 

Lectures and seminars. The history and significance of mysticism are discussed 
with primary reference to the tradition of mystical experience within Christianity. 
Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Ralston.] 

S. T. 18. Contemporary Theology. 

An examination of several of the significant figures in the post-Barthian period, 
together with some of the dominant issues which characterize the present theological 
climate. Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Gesisell.] 

*S. T. 19. Religious Language and Theological Method. 

The nature of our knowledge of God. An analysis of various types of analogical 
thinking, with special reference to contemporary criticism of religious language. Two 
hours, one semester. Elective. Open to students with some previous knowledge of 
philosophy. [Mr. Ralston.] 

*S. T. 20. The Theology o^ the Prayer Book. 

The teaching of the Church expressed in The Book of Common Prayer. Two hours, 
one semester. Elective. [Mr. Woods.] 

*S. T. 21. Christian Social Ethics. 

Seminars designed to consider particular problems of relation between the Church 
and the social order, such as: Communism, racism, nuclear war, alcoholism. Two 
hours, one semester. Elective. [Messrs. Ralston, Winters, and Gessell.] 

S. T. 22. Special Studies in Philosophical Theology. 

Lectures and seminars. The work of a particular theologian is examined In detail. 
1964-65, second semester: William Porcher DuBose. Two hours, one semester. Elective. 
[Messrs. Winters, Ralston.] 

*S. T. 24.. Ascetical Theology. 

The Christian doctrine of the Vision of God, as exemplified In the classic literature 



i 



*Not offered In 1964-65. 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY I23 

of Christian spirltiiality, with special attention to the moral theology of the sacra- 
ment of penance. Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Ralston.] 

S. T. 25. Guided Research. 

Seminar or tutorial sessions to assist honors or graduate students to conduct In- 
dependent research. Two hours, one semester. Elective by arrangement with the 
appropriate instructor. 



Church History Field 

C. H. 2-3. General Church History. 

The life and growth of the Church Universal. Three hours in each of two semesters. 
C.H. 2 required of Juniors; C.H. 3 required of Middlers. [Mr. Allison.] 

C. H. 4. English Church History. 

The development of Christianity in England from its beginning, with special emphasis 
upon the distinctive characteristics of Anglicanism. Three hours, one semester. Re- 
quired of Middlers. [Mr. Allison.] 

C. H. 5. American Church History. 

The history of Christianity in America, with special attention to the Protestant 
Episcopal Church. Two hours, one semester. Required of Seniors. [Mr. Allison.] 

C. H. 6. The Christian Mission, 

A review of the expansion of Christianity from the beginning; the motives, methods, 
theology, strategy, and present opportunities of the Church's Mission. Two hours, one 
semester. Required of Seniors. [Mr. Allison,] 

C. H. 11. 17th Century Anglicanism. 

A study of Anglicanism as It Is exemplified in the writings of 17th century divines, 
using primary sources. Two hours, one semester. Elective. [Mr. Allison,] 

C. H. 12. 19th Century Anglicanism. 

A study of Issues and events of the 19th century English Church with special 
attention to the Issues of Biblical criticism, science, and secularism. Two hours, one 
semester. Elective. [Mr. Allison.] 

C. H. 14. Christianity and Contemporary Literature. 

A study of the religious Issues as they are shown In the writings of modern poets, 
novelists, dramatists, and critics, not as literary criticism but as historical documents 
Illustrative of contemporary history. Two hours, one semester. Elective, [Mr. 
Allison.] 

Pastoral Theology Field 

P. T. 1. Liturgies, The Book of Common Prayer. 

The history, contents, and use of the Book of Common Prayer; practical instruction 
in the ministration of the services of the church. Three hours, one semester. Re- 
quired of Juniors. [Mr. Woods.] 



124 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Additional training in ministration is afforded students throughout the theological 
course through participation in the services of St. Luke's Chapel. Additional practice 
and individual instruction will be required of those with special speech or reading 
problems. 

P. T. 2. Introduction to Pastoral Theology. 

The functional aspects of the Christian ministry together with its cultural and 
theological background. Three hours, second semester. Required of Juniors. [Messrs. 
Gessell, Woods.] 

P. T. 3. Pastoral Care and Homijetics. 

The function of the pastoral office in the life of the Church and its relation to the 
Christian ministry. Practice in expository preaching. Three hours, first semester. 
Required of Middlers. [Messrs. Gessell, Myers.] 

P. T. 4. The Curriculum for Christian Education and Homiletlcs. 

The function of the parish as teacher and the dynamics of the parish educational 
program. Practice in preaching and the liturgical year. Three hours, second semester. 
Required of Middlers. [Mr. Myers.] 

P. T. 5. Homiletics. 

Preaching as proclamation; the Gospel in relation to the contemporary situation. 
Three hours, first semester. Required of Seniors. [Mr. Myers.] 

P. T. 6. Parish Administration and Canon Law. 

The aims, principles, and methods of the pastoral ministry. The minister's work 
as pastor, teacher, and priest. Canon law and the practical phases of parish 
management. Three hours, second semester. Required of Seniors. [Mr. Alexander.] 

P. T. 8. Liturgies, Christian Worship. 

Theology of worship; the Jewish background; the origin and development of 
Christian liturgical forms. Primary emphasis is given to the history, meaning, and use 
of the liturgies of Holy Baptism and the Eucharist. Three hours, second semester. 
Required of Seniors. [Mr. Woods.] 

P. T. 11. Christian Education. Course Structure and Design. 

Practice under supervision in planning and teaching church school classes, adult and 
youth groups. Two hours, first semester. Elective. [Mr. Myers.] 

P. T. 12. Pastoral Counseling. 

The principles of counseling as reflected in case studies. Preparation and resources 
for pastoral counseling. Two hours, second semester. Elective. [Mr. Woods.] 

P. T. 13. The Choral Service. 

Advanced training in the liturgical music for Morning and Evening Prayer, the 
Litany, and the Holy Communion. One hour, first semester. Elective. [Mr. Running.] 

*P. T. 14. The Dynamic of Christian Community. 

An exploration of the interpersonal factors affecting the ministry and mission of 



*Offered as P. T. lo, first semester in 1964-65. 



THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY I25 

the Church in contemporary community. Two hours, second semester. Elective. 
[Mr. Myers.] 

P. T. 15. Guided Research. 

Seminar in pastoral theology. Two hours, one semester. Elective by permission of 
the instructor. 

tP. T. 16. Law and the Minister. 

Seminar In: i. analysis of the legal act In terms of injuria, causa and damnum; 2. 
details of the Insurance mechanism, I.e., life, accident and health, property and casualty 
insurance. One hour, first semester. Elective for Seniors. [Mr. Ward.] 

Church Music. 

The fundamentals of music and basic principles of voice production. Study and use 
of the Hymnal 1940, the Psalter, and the Choral Service. Required of all students, 
three years. One hour credit the first year. [Mr. Running.] 

*ClInical Pastoral Training. 

Work under the Council for Clinical Training for one summer quarter in general 
hospitals, mental hospitals, or penal institutions. Required of all students, preferably 
between the Junior and MIddler Years. Clinical Training fee Is $100, payable second 
semester of the first year. Two hours credit. 

Supplementary training Is recommended for the second summer on an elective, non- 
credit basis with one of the following Institutions: The Institute for Pastoral Care; 
The Student Rural Church Training Program of the National Council of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church; The National Council's Overseas Training Program for Seminar- 
ians; and Army, Navy Chaplains' Schools. 



Supplementary Electives 
Given as Announced 

College Course: Religion 305-306. Comparative Religion. 

First semester: primitive and ancient religion; the religions of India and the Far 
East, Including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto. Second 
semester: religions of the Near East, Including Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. 
Prerequisite: a year of religion or philosophy. Three hours, each semester. Elective. 
[Mr. Collbs.] 

A Philosophy of Science. 

Studies in the relation of science, philosophy, and religion. One hour, one semester. 
Elective. [Mr. McCrady.] 



tOffered in 1964-65. 

*See also Clinical Pastoral Training page 116. 



126 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Latin 11-12. Ecclesiastical Latin. 

A study of the fundamentals of the Latin language leading to selected readings 
from the Vulgate Bible and from a variety of early Christian and medieval writers. 
Two hours, each semester. Elective. [Mr. Binnicker.] 

Theological Bibliography. 

Includes the preparation of a bibliography, documentation, and introduction to the 
literature of the several theological disciplines. Two hours, one semester. [Mr. 
Camp.] 

Liturgical Art. 

An introduction to understanding the background and intention of Christian 
Liturgical Art; its continuity, the mediums of expression, and its place in the total 
field of art. Two hours, one semester, [Mr. Barrett.] 



ACTIVITIES 

The St. Luke^s Journal of Theology 
This publication is issued three times during the academic year and 
is now in its eighth year as a continuing organ for theological discus- 
sion. It is edited and managed by the students of St. Luke's with the 
help of a faculty advisory committee. 

The St. Luke^'s Society 
As the organization of the student body of the School of Theology 
the St. Luke's Society sponsors many activities including a lecture 
series, missionary work, social activities, intramural athletics, publica- 
tions, and inter-seminary activities. 

Special Classes for Students' Wives 
Each semester a series of five lectures is offered by a faculty member 
for all student wives. These presentations are so arranged that in the 
course of three years a student wife has the opportunity to become ac- 
quainted with the major fields of study in the seminary curriculum. 

Lectures and Concerts 
In addition to the regular lecture series sponsored by The Univer- 
sity OF the South, the School of Theology offers to the student body 
and community two memorial lectureships. The William P. DuBose 
Lecturer in the fall of 1964 was the Rev. Dr. Clifford L. Stanley of 
Virginia Theological Seminary, Alexandria, Virginia. The Samuel 
Marshall Beattie Lecturer in the spring of 1965 is the Rev. Dr. Julian 
N. Hartt of Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 12/ 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Sewanee, Tennessee 

The Very Rev. George Moyer Alexander, D.D., ST.D., Dean 

The Rev. Massey H. Shepherd, Jr., 
Ph.D., S.T.D., D.D., Litt.D., Director 

The University of the South established its Graduate School of 
Theology in 1937 to afford clergymen an opportunity for post- 
ordination study, in close personal contact with recognized leaders of 
theological knowledge and interpretation. 

The sessions of the School are held for five weeks every summer, 
usually in July and August. Because of this fact, it is possible to in- 
vite scholars from other institutions to be members of the faculty; and 
the personnel of the faculty changes considerably from year to year. 
Thus the School is a rendezvous of teachers and scholars, as well as 
a community of men who wish to continue and enrich their education. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Regular Students take courses for academic credit, looking toward 
the granting of a degree. Most of them find it impracticable to take 
more than three courses for credit at one session of the School; and 
the requirements for a degree are designed in accordance with this fact. 

Besides regular candidates for a degree, men who have an acceptable 
background of theological training may be admitted as Special Stu- 
dents. Especially qualified students in recognized schools of theology 
may be admitted, but only with the express permission of the schools 
in which they are enrolled and in agreement with these schools in re- 
gard to any acceptance of credit for work done in the Graduate School. 

Auditors are permitted to attend all lectures but receive no academi( 
credit. Regular students may audit the lectures in courses for which 
they are not receiving academic credit. 



126 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

The program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Divinity in this 
School has been suspended, and no new applications for entrance upon 
such a program will now be accepted. But any regular Seminary of the 
Church is free to grant to its appHcants for the B.D. degree credit for 
courses taken in the Graduate School. This does not preclude con- 
tinuation of work thereon by those already accepted as Candidates for 
that degree, or the granting of the degree upon satisfactory completion 
of the work required. 

The Degree of Master of Sacred Theology* 

1. An applicant for the Master of Sacred Theology degree must possess the degree 
of Bachelor of Divinhy (or Th.B. or S.T.B.). 

2. An applicant becomes a Candidate for the Master's degree by vote of the faculty 
of the Graduate School of Tlieology after he has completed six courses in residence In 
the Graduate School 

3. The recipient of this degree must have completed not less than nine courses of 
graduate work in addition to any work done in fulfillment of requirements for the 
Bachelor of Divinity degree. 

4. These courses must be completed within a period of not less than three years 
and not more than seven years, unless the time be extended by the faculty. 

5. At least five courses must be in the same field of study and shall constitute a 
"major group of studies." At least two courses must be taken in a different field 
from the major. 

6. The applicant must present a satisfactory thesis upon a subject directly connected 
with his major group of studies. 

7. In addition to course examinations, he shall pass satisfactorily a general ex- 
amination which shall be prescribed at the time of the Candidate's completion of all 
required courses for the degree. 

8. The Master's degree will not be 'conferred honoris causa. 

9. Candidates for degrees who were accepted as such under older regulations may 
be graduated in accordance with the agreement then existing. 

10. In cases where the faculty has voted an extension of time to Candidates who 
have not completed requirements in the appointed time, the faculty shall have the 
right to impose such additional requirements as they may deem necessary. 

A course In the School describes approximately the equivalent of 
two semester-hours. Including lectures and research work, it will en- 
tail about ninetv hours of work durlno^ the five weeks. 



*See also page 114 for S.T.M. requirements. School of Theology. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 129 

ACCOMMODATIONS 

Accommodations for single men will be in St. Luke's Hall or other 
University buildings. Single men must provide their own bed linen and 
towels, as must married men bringing families for University furnished 
housing. 

A limited number of quarters for families can be provided. These 
are of three classes : 

*i. Woodland apartments, old barracks-type, military surplus build- 
ings with three units in each, are normally used by married stu- 
dents. They include a combination living and dining room, two small 
bedrooms, and a bath. Minimum dormitory furnishings are Included. 
Rental for these units is $55 for the full session. The University stone 
apartments with University furniture rent for ^60 and the stone houses 
for ^65. These rents include ^5 for water and electricity. The new 
stone dormitory close to St. Luke's Hall, named Benedict Hall, has 
been reserved for the Graduate School. It has two-room suites which 
can accommodate families of four. Each large motel-like room has two 
innerspring beds with a private bath for each suite. Rental for the 
suites Is $60 for the session. 

2. Units In the Woodland area may be sublet, furnished, from mar- 
ried students, for rents ranging from ^80 to $120 for the five week 
period. 

3. Faculty homes and fraternity houses vacant for the summer may 
be rented for the session. Rents are apt to be ^150 to ^200 for these 
accommodations. 

Address your Inquiry to the Dean's Office, stating the size of your 
family and what you wish to pay. 

A non-returnable deposit of $15.00 is required with each application. 
This will be credited to Graduate School expenses. 

BOARD 

The cost of board for the session for students' families is $95.00 for 
each adult person. Children of school age may board for $75 for the 
session. The cost of board for children under six years of age Is $.50 
per meal, or $50.00 for the session. 

For those who do not wish to take all meals in the University dining 



*Pets will not be permitted in Woodland apartments. 



130 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

hall, payments must be arranged at registration. Separate meals for 

each person over the five-week period are: 

Breakfast $25.00 

Lunch 32.50 

Dinner 40.00 

The prices of single meals are as follows: 

Breakfast 75 

Lunch i.oo 

Dinner 1.25 



FEES 

The Fees for the summer session are as follows : 

Registration and tuition $1 lo.oo 

Board and room, not including linen, at St. Luke's 140.00 

(Room without board, $45.00 for the session) 

Total $250.00 



THE SUMMER SESSION OF 1964 
July 15 — August 19 

THE FACULTY 

The Very Rev. GEORGE MOYER ALEXANDER, D.D., S.TX)., Dean 

The Rev. MASSEY HAMILTON SHEPHERD, JR., Ph.D., S.TX>., D.D., Lrrr.D. 

Director 

Professor of Liturgies, The Church Divinity School of the Pacific, 

Berkeley, California 

The Rev. SHUNJI FORREST NISHI, Ph.D. 

Episcopal Chaplain to Faculty and Graduate Students at the University of California; 
Lecturer and Tutor in the Church Divinity School of the Pacific, 
Berkeley, California 

Mr. GLANVILLE DOWNEY, Ph.D. 

Professor of Byzantine Literature, Dumbarton Oaks, Harvard University, 
Washington, D, C. 

The Rev. JOHN HOWARD WINSLOW RHYS, S.T.M., Th.D. 

Professor of New Testament, 
The University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY I3I 

The Rev. LAWRENCE LORD BROWN, M.A., D.D. 

Professor of Church History and Assistant Dean, 

The Episcopal Theological Seminary of the Southwest, Austin, Texas; 

Editor, Historical Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 

The Rev. MILTON REESE LEROY, B.D., S.T.M. 

Professor and Supervisor of Christian Education, 
Saint Margaret's House, Berkeley, California 



COURSES OFFERED 1964 

New Testament 20. The Gospel According to Matthew. 

Advanced introduction and exposition. [Mr. Rhys.] 

New Testament 41. The Catholic Epistles. 

An analysis of the general epistles of the New Testament and their relation to the 
life and thought of Christianity in the post-apostolic age. [Mr. Shepherd.] 

Church History 35. The English Reformation to 1570. 

A study of the Reformation Settlement in England against the background of social, 
political, economic, and intellectual developments in the period. [Mr. Brown.] 

Church History 48. The Church and the City in the Roman Empire. 

A study of the Church and the world in the Graeco-Roman city, illustrating the 
problems the Church encountered, and the methods it employed in dealing with the 
pagan elements in the structure and life of the city. [Mr. Downey.] 

Theology 48. Faith and Order in the Ecumenical Movement. 

The historical background for 'Faith and Order,' and particularly the theological 
Issues, the changes and developments In the theological orientation in the Ecumenical 
Movement as evidenced in 'Faith and Order.' [Mr. Nishi.] 

Theology 72. The Christian Mission in Changing Cultures. 

A study of the mission of the Church in areas of rapid social, political, and economic 
change. [Mr. LeRoy.] 



THE SUMMER SESSION OF 1965 
July 14 — August 18 

THE FACULTY 
The Very Rev. GEORGE MOYER ALEXANDER, D.D., S.T.D., Dean 

The Rev. MASSEY HAMILTON SHEPHERD, JR., PhD., S.T.D., D.D., LittD. 

Director 

Professor of Liturgies, The Church Divinity School of the Pacific, 

Berkeley, California 



132 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The Rev. CHARLES LAYFAETTE WINTERS, JR., Th.D. 

Associate Professor of Dogmatic Theology, The University of the South, 

Sewanee, Tennessee 

The Rev. Canon HUGH GERARD GIBSON HERKLOTS, M.A. (Cantab. 

Residentiary Canon of Peterborough Cathedral and Moderator 

of the Church Training Colleges, Peterborough, England 

The Rev. JOHN HOWARD WINSLOW RHYS, Th.D. 

Professor of New Testament, The University of the South, 
Sewanee, Tennessee 

The Rev. JAMES ANDERSON CARPENTER, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Dogmatic Theology, The General Theological Seminary, 

New York City 



COURSES OFFERED 1965 

New Testament 24. The Pastoral Epistles. 

Advanced introduction and exposition; historical and theological background. [Mr. 
Rhys.] 

Church History 47. Constantlne and Christianity. 

Antecedents and effects of Constantlne's conversion and favor of Christianity; 
doctrinal developments; liturgical and monumental develooments of the age. [Mr. 
Shepherd.] 

Church History 73. The Church of England and the Church in America. 

The relationship between the Church of England and the Episcopal Church from 
the early voyages of discovery to the first Lambeth Conference; special reference to 
the emergence of the Anglican Communion. [Mr. Herklots.] 

Theology 52. Modern Christology: From Schlelermacher to Gore. 

The doctrine of the Person of Christ In the nineteenth century. [Mr. Carpenter.] 

Theology 67. Contemporary Problems in Theology. 

An examination of newly thallenging problems — mamly methodologlcal-eplstemo- 
loglcal — ^whlch are replacing older llberal-fundamentallst-neoorthodox trends as the 
primary concerns of systematic theology. [Mr, Winters.] 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 133 

BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR COURSES— 1965 

N. T. 24. The Pastoral Epistles (Rhys) 

B. S. Easton, The Pastoral Epistles. Scribner's, 1947. 

R. M. Grant, Gnosticism and Early Christianity . Columbia University Press, 1959. 

C. F. D. Moule, The Birth of the New Testament. Harper and Row, 1962. 

C. H. 47. Constantine and Christianity (Shepherd) 

V. C. DeClercq, Ossius of Cordova (Studies in Christian Antiquity). The Catholic 
University of America Press, 1954. 

A. H. M. Jones, Constantine and the Conversion of Europe (Teach Yourself History 
Library). Macmillan, 1949. 

Hans Lietzmann, From Constantine to Julian (A History of the Early Church, 
Vol. III). Scribner's, 1950. (Paperback reprint with Vol. IV available.) 

C. H. 73. The Church of England and the Church in America (Herklots) 

H. G. G. Herklots, Frontiers of the Church. Ernest Benn, 1961. 
W. W. Manross, A History of the American Episcopal Church. Morehouse-Gorham, 
1950. 
J. R. H. Moorman, A History of the Church of England. A. and C. Black, 1953. 
H. P. Thompson, Into All Lands. The History of the S. P. G. S. Pw C. K., 1951. 

Theology 52. Modern Christology (Carpenter) 

Karl Barth, Protestant Thought from Rousseau to Ritschl. Harpers, 1959. 

J. A. Carpenter, Gore: A Study in Liberal Catholic Thought. Faith Press, i960. 

Vilhelm Gronbech, Religious Currents in the 19th Century. University of Kansas 
Press, 1964. 

E. C. Moore, An Outline of the History of Christian Thought Since Kant. Scribner's, 
1912. Reprinted, 1947. 

R. R. Niebuhr, Schleiermacher on Christ and Religion. Scribner's, 1964. 

Theology 67. Contemporary Problems in Theology (Winters) 

A. G. N. Flew and A. Maclntyre, New Essays in Philosophical Theology, Macmillan, 
I9SS. 

William Hordern, Speaking of God. Macmillan, 1964. 

John Macmurray, The Self As Agent. Harpers, 1957. Persons in Relation. Harpers, 
1961. 

P. M. van Buren, The Secular Meaning of the Gospel. Macmillan, 1963. 



SUMMER INSTITUTE 

OF 

SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 



136 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

SUMMER INSTITUTE 

The Summer Institute of Science and Mathematics 

FOR Secondary School Teachers 

Supported by the National Science Foundation 

The University of the South in 1959 established the degree of 
Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.). The faculty was aware that 
there was little opportunity for secondary school teachers to work for 
an advanced degree other than in the field of education or in a specific 
subject. Accordingly, in i960 the National Science Foundation was 
requested to support a sequential program of study leading to a Mas- 
ter's degree in the basic sciences. The request was granted, the 
Summer Institute was in session from June 26 to August 19, 1961, and 
renewals of the grant have made it possible to continue the program. 

The dates for the 1965 Summer Institute are June 21 to August 14. 

Major Objectives of the Institute 

1. To offer quality courses in mathematics and science in order to 
strengthen the subject-matter competence of the participants. 

2. To make it possible for the members of the Institute to work toward 
an advanced degree in coDtent courses rather than in method courses. 

3. To acquaint the high school teachers by means of seminars, special 
lectures, trips, and informal discussions with modern developments 
in science and mathematics. 

Degree Requirements 

A minimum of 30 semester hours, including a thesis, is required for 
the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching. Three summers, or the 
equivalent, in residence are necessary. A candidate for the M.A.T. 
degree must complete the following requirements: 
(i) Basic Courses. 

(a) Mathematics 151-S, (b) Biology 151-S, (c) Chemistry 151-S, 
(d) Physics 151-S, and (e) History of Science 151-S. 
(2) Advanced Study. 

(a) Mathematics 351-S. (b) Such additional advanced courses as 
may be prescribed by the candidate's major department. The number 
of courses required will depend upon the candidate's qualifications, (c) 



SUMMER INSTITUTE 137 

An acceptable thesis or research project in a field in which the candi- 
date has taken an advanced course. The department in which this 
requirement is fulfilled will be referred to as the candidate's major 
department. A faculty committee from the major department will 
determine if a candidate has successfully completed this requirement, 
(d) Satisfactory completion of a final examination administered by 
the major department. 

Granting of a Degree 

At any time after satisfactory completion of the basic course require- 
ments, a participant miay apply to one of the departments for admission 
to candidacy for a degree. Such application may be made either before 
or after completion of advanced courses. If accepted by the depart- 
ment to which application is m.ade, the candidate shall then initiate re- 
search and advanced study as prescribed by that (major) department, 
in fulfillment of the thesis requirement. 

After completion of all requirements, the candidate's major depart- 
ment shall recommend to the University Senate that the degree of 
Master of Arts in Teaching be granted. 

Sequence of Courses 

The order in which the courses are to be taken shall be determined 
by the participant and the institute faculty on an individual basis. No 
rigid sequence of courses shall be required, except that the advanced 
work requirements normally shall follow completion of the basic 
courses. 

Normal Time Required 

The program is designed for completion of the degree requirements 
in four summers. Applicants with a strong background in a particular 
subject may satisfy the basic course requirement in that subject by de- 
partmental examination. The number of credits that can be satisfied 
in this manner will be limited to eight semester hours. In the usual 
case, participants take two courses per summer. 

Number of Participants 
As no rigid sequence of courses will be required, a participant may 
enroll in the program at the beginning of any summer. It is planned 
to maintain the number of participants at about fifty. After the first 



138 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

summer (and each succeeding summer), the number of returning par- 
ticipants shall be determined by advanced registration; new applicants 
shall then be considered until the desired number (50) of participants 
has been accepted. It should be clearly understood that neither The 
University of the South nor the National Science Foundation can 
guarantee that this Institute will be continued In subsequent summers. 

Courses of Instruction 

A course in a laboratory science provides 5 hours of lectures, an hour 
seminar, and 6 hours of laboratory per week. Four semester hours 
of credit may be obtained. 

A course in mathematics provides 5 hours of lectures and an hour 
seminar per week. Three semester hours of credit may be obtained. 

Basic Courses 

Biology 151-S. 

A course stressing the modern aspects of bloecology. The laboratory will deal with 
the role of the environment in the energy relations of organisms. Cellular physiology 
will be Introduced in this course. 

Chemistry 151-S. 

A course emphasizing the modem aspects of Inorganic chemistry. The basic concepts 
m atomic and molecular structure and their relation to chemical behavior will be 
studied. Selected laboratory experiments will be performed. 

History of Science 151-S. 

A course consisting of reading and discussion of origmal sources. The contributions 
of science to the cultural heritage will be stressed. 

Mathematics 151-S. 

A modem unified course mcludlng such topics as the concept of function, analytic 
geometry, trigonometry, and an introduction to the calculus. 

Physics 151-S. 

An elementary course in modern physics Including mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, 
magnetism, and optics. The fundamentals of atomic and nuclear physics will be intro- 
duced. The laboratory affords an opportunity for training in experimental procedures. 

Advanced Courses 

Biology 553-S (Evolution and Genetics). 

A course designed for advanced participants. Modern aspects of population genetics 
and biochemical genetics will be stressed. The fundamentals of neo-Darwinism will 
be included. 



SUMMER INSTITUTE 139 

Mathematics 351-S (Finite Mathematics). 

Sets, the relation of sets to symbolic logic, probability theory, vectors, and matrices. 
The text for this course will be INTRODUCTION TO FINITE MATHEMATICS 
by Kemeny, Snell, and Thompson. 

Radioisotopes 551-S (Basic Theory and Techniques). 

The first part of this course will be taken by all students who enroll. The basiic 
phenomena involved in radioactivity and the production and use of radioisotopes will 
be studied. Laboratory experiments will be given to demonstrate the detection and 
safe handlmg of radioactive materials. 

In the second part, the student will elect to concentrate his study in one of the 
laboratory sciences. Depending upon the science chosen, the participant will receive 
credit for Biology 551-S, Chemistry S51-S, or Physics 551-S. The lectures and labora- 
tory in this part of the course will be designed to demonstrate the applications of 
radioisotopes to a particular science. 

Chemistry 552-S (Topics in Analytical Chemistry). 

An advanted library and laboratory study in Analytical Chemistry under the 
direction of one or more of the chemistry staff. Not offered in 1965. 

Chemistry 553-S (Topics in Organic and Physical Chemistry). 

An advanced library and laboratory study in Organic and Physical Chemistry under 
the direction of one or more of the chemistry staff. 

Mathematics 552-S (Modern Algebra). 

'An. introduction to the standard algebraic structures: groups, rings, fields, integral 
domains. Particular attention paid to commutative algebra relevant to secondary 
school work. Not offered In 1965. 

Mathematics 553-S (Mathematical Analysis). 

An introduction to mathematical analysis with an emphasis on those properties of 
real numbers whith are relevant to secondary school mathematics. 

Physics 552-S (Topics ih Advanced Physics). 

Selected fields accordmg to the Interests of physics majors; e.g., atomic and nuclear 
physics, electronics, optics, etc. Not offered in 1965. 

Physics 553-S (Topics in Advanced Physics). 

Fundamental principles of electric and magnetic fields; electrostatic fields, Gauss's 
Law; scalar potential solutions of electrostatic problems, dipole theory of dielectrics; 
magnetic effects of currents, vector potential, forces on movmg charges, dipole theory 
of magnetic materials. 

Biology 552-S (Advanced Botany). 

Taxonomy of vascular plants. Locally collected specimens will be used to study 
identification, nomenclature, phylogeny and distribution of typical plant families. 
Not offered m 1965. 



140 the university of the south 

Staff of the Institute (1965) 

Biology: Harry C. Yeatman, Ph.D., H. Malcolm Owen, Ph.D. 

Chemistry: David B. Camp, Ph.D. 

History of Science: David McQueen, M.A. 

Physics: Eric H. Ellis, PI1.D., Thomas Greenslade, PhD. 

Mathematics: S. Alexander McLeod, M.A.; James T. Cross, Ph.D. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 



742 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences may receive financial 
assistance in the form of scholarships, jobs, or loans, or a combination 
of these. No scholarship will be awarded except with the approval of 
the College Committee on Admissions and Scholarships. 

Scholarships are awarded to students in the College by the Vice- 
Chancellor upon nomination by the Faculty Committee on Admissions 
and Scholarships-. Special scholarships listed below are awarded upon 
nomination of the persons designated, with the approval of the Com- 
mittee. 

SPECIAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

The following scholarships are awarded by the Vice-Chancellor to candidates 
nominated by the authorities named in the individual grants. In order to retain 
these scholarships, the recipients must meet the same academic requirements as other 
scholarship holders. 

If those designated to nominate candidates for any of these scholarships have not 
made their nominations thirty days before the opening of school, the scholarships 
will be awarded for that year by the Vice-Chancellor in the same manner as other 
University scholarships. 

The Rosa C. Allen Scholarship 

The income from a fund of $14,000, for the benefit of Christian education. Re- 
cipients shall be nominated by the Rector of Christ Church, Houston, Texas, and 
must be resident in the Diocese of Texas. 

The Alston Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $67,056.30, the bequest of Mrs. Caro duBignon Alston of Atlanta, 
Georgia, to provide one or more scholarships, the recipients of which are to be 
chosen by the Bishop of the Diocese of Atlanta and the Rector of St. Luke's Episcopal 
Church, Atlanta, Georgia. The beneficiaries of the scholarships shall be students 
studying for the ministry either in the College of Arts and Sciences or in the School 
of Theology of The University of the South. 

The Abel Seymour and Eliza Scott Baldwin Scholarship 

A fund of $19,179.34 established by the Executors and Trustees under the will of 
Eliza Scott Baldwin, of Duval County, Florida. The income is to be used for 
scholarships for boys who are residents of the City of Jacksonville, Florida, Bene- 
ficiaries to be nominated by the Rt. Rev, Frank A. Juhan, D.D., formerly Bishop of 
Florida. 

The Robert V. Bodfish Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $3,320, established by the family and friends of Robert V. Bodfish, 
an alumnus of this University, who lost his life in a tragic accident. Beneficiaries are 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE COLLEGE I43 

to be nominated by the Rev. James Savoy, D.D. Should he make no nomination, the 
nomination may be made by the Bishops in the Diocese of Tennessee, or by the 
Vice-Chancellor. 

The Leslie G. Boxwell Scholarship 

A fund of $66,294.71, established by the will of Leslie G. Boxwell of Nashville, 
Tennessee. Either prmcipal or interest, or both, may be used to grant scholarships 
to the University upon such terms and conditions as the University deems fit and 
proper. 

The George Nexsen Brady Scholarship 

The income from $6,000, the gift of R. McClelland B'rady and Mary A. Berry, 
of Detroit, Mich., as a memorial to their father, George Nexsen Brady, toward the 
expenses of a worthy student in the University, preferably a postulant or a candidate 
for Holy Orders, the beneficiary to be nominated by the Bishop of the Diocese of 
Michigan; or by the Vice-Chancellor of the University in the event of no nomination 
being made by said Bishop prior to thirty days before the opening of the school 
term. 

The Margaret E. Bridgers Scholarship 

The income from $6,000, to educate one or more deserving young men of promise 
in need of financial aid, said beneficiary to be selected and nominated by the rector 
of St. James's Church, Wilmington, N. C. 

The Ezzell Dobson Memorial Scholarship 

The Income from $5,000 established by Mr. and Mrs. Matt H. Dobson, Jr., in 
memory of their son, James Ezzell Dobson, who, as a senior student in the University, 
was killed in an automobile accident April 4, 1947. This Scholarship in the aca- 
demic course is to be awarded upon norr^ination by Sophia Ezzell Dobson and Matt 
H. Dobson, Jr., or their descendants. If no choice is made by them, the Vice- 
Chancellor is to award this Scholarship to a student of fine character and academic 
attainment. It is desired that the recipients of this Scholarship will endeavor to ad- 
here to the high traditions of the University and in so doing serve for the betterment 
of their fellow man. 

The Jessie Ball duPont Scholarship 

The income from $475,212, established by Mrs. Jessie Ball duPont in 1958, to assist 
in the education of worthy students at The University of the South. 

The Jessie Ball duPont-Frank A. Juhan Scholarship 
The income from $185,303, to aid worthy and needy students nominated by Bishop 

Frank A. Juhan or whomever Bishop Juhan may designate. In the event that all 

available funds are not utilized by Bishop Juhan, other beneficiaries may be appointed 

by the Vice-Chancellor. 

These scholarships are outright gifts, but the donor hopes that the recipients will 

later pass along the same amount that they have received to some worthy student to 

assist in financing his education. 



144 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The Dr. William Egleston Scholarship 

The Income from ^5,000, established by the will of Dr. William Egleston of 
Hartsville, South Carolina. The beneficiary shall be nominated by the Bishop of 
South Carolina; but if the Bishop of South Carolina does not nominate any one, the 
nomination may be made by the Bishop of Upper South Carolina, or in default 
thereof, by the Vice-Chancellor. 

The George William Gillespie Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $170^5, contributed by the members of St. Mark's Church, San An- 
tonio, Texas, as a memorial to George William Gillespie, a former student in this 
University. Beneficiary to be nominated by the Rector of St. Mark's Church, San 
Antonio, Texas. In the event that St. Mark's does not make a recommendation, the 
nomination Is to be made by the Vice-Chancellor of the University. 

The Laura Hoadley Humphrey Scholarship 

The income from $6,100, the bequest of Mrs. Laura Hoadley Humphrey of La 
Grange, Georgia, for a postulant or postulants from the Diocese of Atlanta and 
nominated by the Bishop of Atlanta. The beneficarles are "morally bound to serve 
said Diocese" after their ordination for the time equivalent to that during which they 
were beneficiaries. 

The W. Lloyd Hunt Memorial Scholarship 

The Income from $5,000, established 1929, by Mrs. Laura G. Hunt, of Asheville, 
N. C, In memory of her husband. For postulants for Holy Orders; the beneficiary 
to be designated by the Rector of Trinity Church, Asheville, N. C, or by the Vice- 
Chancellor of the University in case the designation Is not made on or before 
September i. 

The Thomas Sublette Jordan Scholarship 

A fund of $25,000, established by the will of Thomas S. Jordan of Jefferson County, 
West Virginia, The Income will be used exclusively for the benefit of needy and worthy 
students domiciled in the State of West Virginia who are attending the University. 

The Mighell Memorial Scholarship 

The Income from $31,127.70, the gift of Mabel MIghell Moffat of Mobile, Alabama, as 
a memorial to her father, Joseph Richard MIghell, and her great nephew, Joseph Rich- 
ard MIghell IV. The Income Is to be used preferably for young men from Christ Church 
Parish, Mobile; the second preference Is for applicants from Mobile County, Alabama. 
In case no qualified candidate applies in any given year from either named place, the 
beneficiary Is to be designated by the Bishop of Alabama as some boy within the 
Episcopal Diocese of Alabama. 

The Benjamin Strother Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, established 1926, by Mrs. Lucy R. Strother, of Columbia, 
S. C, In memory of her son. Nominations to be made by the Ecclesiastical Authority 
of the Diocese of Upper South Carolina from among worthy boys resident In said 
Diocese, preference being given to boys of Edgefield County. 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE COLLEGE I45 

The Herbert Tutwiler Memorial Scholarship 

The income from a fund of $23,500, established in 1949 by the wife of Mr. Her- 
bert Tutwiler of Biirmingham, Alabama, to be used in payment of expenses incident 
to a regular course of study in the College, The benefiiciary to be a young man of 
character and intellectual promise and a resident of the state of Alabama; first con- 
sideration being given to candidates from Mr. Tutwiler's home parish, the Church of the 
Advent in Birmingham, then to candidates from Jefferson County. The beneficiary 
to be designated by the Bishop of Alabama. 

The Morgan W. Walker Scholarship 

The income from a fund of $2,500, established by Mr. Morgan W. Walker of 
Alexandria, Louisiana. To be used for the aid of students from the Diocese of Lou- 
isiana at The University of the South. The beneficiary to be designated by the 
Bishop of Louisiana. 

The Fred G. Yerkes, Jr., Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the gift of Mr. and Mrs. Fred G. Yerkes, Senior, in de- 
votion to their son, the Reverend Fred G. Yerkes, Jr., to be used in the payment of 
the expenses of a postulant or candidate for Holy Orders from the Diocese of Florida, 
preparing for the Sacred Ministry at The University of the South, and to be awarded 
by the Bishop of the Diocese of Florida or by the Vice-Chantellor of The University 
OF THE South. 

The Fred G. Yerkes, Sr., Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the gift of the Reverend Fred G. Yerkes in memory 
of his father, Fred G. Yerkes, Sr,; to be used in the payment of the expenses of 
a postulant or candidate for Holy Orders, preferably from the Diocese of Florida, 
preparing for the Sacred Ministry at The University of the Soxtfh, and to be awarded 
by the Bishop of the Diocese of Florida or by the Vice-Chancellor of The University 
OF THE South. 

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS 

The proceeds from the scholarship funds listed are awarded by the Vice-Chancellor 
to students nominated by the Faculty Committee on Admissions and Scholarships. 
Awards are made for a period of one year, though they may be renewed from year to 
year if the recipients are doing satisfactory work, and may be cancelled at the end 
of any semester during which the student's academic record does not meet the minimum 
requirements for scholarship holders. 

These scholarships are awarded to students of adequate ability and demonstrated 
financial need. Awards may be made to entering students or to students already en- 
rolled in the College. 

The University of the South is one of forty-four Southern colleges which subscribe 
to the following statement concerning financial aid: 

Scholarship Agreement 

1. Financial aid consists of scholarships or grants, loans, and employment. The 
financial aid programs in most of these colleges are composed of various combmations 
of these types of aid. 

2. The principal responsibility for financing a college education lies with the family. 



10 



146 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

A student who needs financial assistance should be expected to work for and to 
borrow a reasonable part of the aid needed to meet expenses. 

3. In selecting a financial aid recipient, special consideration should be given to 
the applicant's promise and achievement. 

4. The amount of financial aid given a student should be determined on the basis 
of his financial need. 

5. It is desirable for colleges to consult one another in establishing the size of a 
stipend for a common applicant in order that the candidate may choose his college 
rather than his stipend. 

6. Each applicant for financial aid at one or more of these institutions must submit 
detailed financial information to the College Scholarship Service for transmittal to 
the institutions concerned. 

7. The amount of stipend depends on the applicant's financial status. It therefore 
represents confidential information which should not be made public by the college, 
the school, or the candidate, whether or not the allocation of financial aid is publicly 
announced. 

8. An applicant for financial aid who is applying to more than one of the institutions 
will not be required to give any of these institutions notice of his acceptance before 
May I. 

The Baker-Bransford Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $37,500, the gift of Mrs. Lizzie Baker Bransford of Augusta, 
Georgia, to be awarded annually by the Vice-Chancellor to worthy and poor boys to 
enable them to secure an education in the University. 

The Grace Mahl Baker Loan Fund 

A fund of $10,000 initiated in 1958 by members of the class of 1927, under the 
leadership of Ralph Speers, Jr., as a tribute to Mrs. George M. Baker, who, during the 
thirty-one years her husband was Dean of the College, won the aff'ection and admiration 
of countless students for her gracious entertaining, her unfailing concern, and her 
Christian example. The fund is to enable students, in case of financial emergency, to 
remain in the University. Loans are to be repaid when the recipient becomes gain- 
fully employed, with interest accruing from the date of employment. 

The William O. Baldwin Scholarship 

The income from $10,600, established in 1958 by Captain William O. Baldwin of 
Montgomery, Alabama, an alumnus of this University, to be used to help the offspring 
of naval personnel. 

The Philo Sherman Bennett Scholarship 

A fund of $500 presented by the Hon. William Jennings Bryan, Trustee, the in- 
come to be applied in aid of poor and deserving boys in obtaining an education. 

The Annie Wingfield Claybrooke Scholarship 

The intome from $8,000, established 1926, by Misses Elvina, Eliza, and Virginia 
Claybrooke, of Nashville, Tennessee, in memory of their sister, Annie Wingfield Clay- 
brooke. To assist in the education of a worthy Southern boy of American birth, 
preferably a postulant or candidate for Holy Orders, the beneficiary to be designated 
by the Vice-Chancellor of the University. 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE COLLEGE 147 

The Columbus, Ga., Scholarship 

The Income from a fund of $5,000, the gift of Mrs. George Foster Peabody, of 
New York. Originally this was a graduate scholarship, but in 1936, by letter to the 
Vice-Chancellor, Mr. Peabody transferred it from a graduate scholarship to an under- 
graduate scholarship in the College. The beneficiary to be named by the Vice- 
Chancellor. 

The Myra Adelia Craigmiles Cross Scholarship 

The Income from $76,300.37, the bequest of Mrs. Myra Adelia Craigmiles Cross, to 
assist In the education of needy and worthy students to be selected by the proper 
officers of the University. Established 193 1. 

' The Byrd Douglas Scholarship 

The Income from approximately $5,800, bequeathed to the University by Miss 
Mary Miller to aid in the education of deserving Tennessee boys, the beneficiaries to 
be appointed by the \^ice-Chancellor. 

The Bishop Dudley Memorial Scholarship 

The Income from $5,000, the gift of Mrs. Herman Aldrich of New York City, In 
memory of the Rt. Rev. Thomas Underwood Dudley, D.D., LL.D., D.C.L., Bishop of 
Kentucky and Chancellor of this University. The beneficiaries are appointed by the 
faculty. 

The Rosalie Quitman Duncan Memorial Scholarship 

The Income from $3,000 bequeathed to the University by Misses Eva C. and Alice 
Quitman Lovell, of Natchez, Miss., to be used In the payment of the expenses of 
some student at The Uxhtj^sity of the South, and to be awarded under rules and 
regulations promulgated by said University. 

The Benjamin H. Frayser Scholarship 

A fund of $2,000, established 1939 by Mrs. Anne R. F. Frayser m memory of her 
son, Dr. Benjamin H. Frayser, a former student In the Medical School of this Uni- 
versity. The income from this fund to assist in defraying the expenses of some 
deserving student appomted by the Vice-Chancellor. The recipient of the scholarship 
shall agree to read a monograph on Major Frayser's life as a part of the require- 
ments to be fulfilled in receiving this award. 

The William A. and Harriet Goodwin Endowment 

The income from $10,420.73, the gift of the late Judge William A. Goodwyn, of 
Memphis, Tenn., and his wife, Harriet Goodw>Ti, for the purpose of educating one or 
more worthy students who could not otherwise defray their college expenses. 

The Charlotte Patten Guerry Scholarship 

The income from $10,000, given by Z. Cartter Patten and his mother. Airs. Sarah 
Key Patten, of Chattanooga, Tennessee, for one or more deserving students who plan 
to study Forestry in the College. The scholarship is named after Mrs. Alexander 



148 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Guerry, wife of Sewanee's late Vice-Chancellor, who did much to expand the Forestry 
Department in the College. 

The James Edward Harton Scholarship 

The income from ^5,500, established 1959, by Mrs. Anne Harton Vinton of Los 
Angeles, California, in memory of her brother, James Edward Harton, an alumnus of 
this University. 

The James Hill Scholarships 

The James Hill Scholarships are provided by the income from a bequest of $39,000, 
made by Mr. James Hill, of Mississippi, for educating promising young men of 
marked ability who are in need of financial assistance to defray their college expenses. 

The Telfair Hodgson Scholarship 

The income from $5,344, the gift of Mrsi. Medora C. Hodgson of Sewanee, Tennessee, 
in memory of her husband, Telfair Hodgson, a devoted alumnus and for many years 
Treasurer of the University. This fund, established in 1961, is to assist worthy and 
needy students. 

The Atlee Heber HoflF Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $3,000, established 1956, by Mrs. Atlee H. Hoff of Decatur, Alabama, 
as a living memorial to her husband, Atlee Heber Hoff, an alumnus of this University, 
whose career was spent in the field of banking, finance, and investment. The income 
of this fund is to be applied to the senior-year University expenses of a worthy 
student of scholastic attainment who is preparing for a career in banking, finance, and 
investment and who has completed three years in the Department of Economics at 
The University of the South. The beneficiary is to be designated by the Vice- 
Chancellor and the Head of the Department of Economics. Should the University 
establish a Graduate School of Economics, this scholarship shall be available at either 
the graduate or undergraduate levels according to the decision of the same authorities. 
The availability of this scholarship shall be announced to those majoring in the above 
subject at the beginning of each term. 

The Atlee Henkel Hoflf Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $3,000, established 1945, by Mr. and Mrs. Atlee H. Hoff of Decatur, 
Alabama, as a living memorial to their son, Lieutenant Atlee Henkel Hoff, USNR, an 
alumnus of this University, who died in the service of his country in World War IL 
The income from this fund is to be applied to the senior-year University expenses of a 
worthy student in Economics of academic attainment who has completed three years 
in this subject at The University of the South. Tlie beneficiary to be designated 
by the Vice-Chancellor and the Head of the Department of Economics. The avail- 
ability of this scholarship shall be announced to those majoring in the above subject 
at the beginning of each term. 

The Louis George Hoff Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $3,000, established 1947, by Mr. and Mrs. Atlee H. Hoff, of Decatur, 
Alabama, as a living memorial to their son, Louis George Hoff, an alumnus of this 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE COLLEGE I49 

University, who lost his life in the Texas City, Texas, disaster of April 16, 1947. 
The income from this fund is to be applied to the senior-year University expenses of 
a worthy student in Chemistry of academic attainment who has 'completed three 
years in this subject at The University of the South. The beneficiary to be desig- 
nated by the Vice-Chancellor and the Head of the Department of Chemistry. The 
availability of this scholarship shall be announced to those majoring in the above 
subject at the beginning of each term. 

The Marshall Hotchkiss Memorial Scholarship 

The income from ^25,000, established by the will of Mrs. Venie Shute Hotchkiss 
as a memorial to her husband, Marshall Hotchkiss. The beneficiaries are appointed 
by a committee of five which is headed by the Vice-Chancellor. 

The Huguenot Society of America Scholarship 

An annual grant of $1,000 for as many as four years from the Huguenot Sdciety of 
America. The recipient of this scholarship must be able to furnish proof of his 
Huguenot ancestry, but he need not be a member of the Society. 

The Jesse H. Jones Scholarships 

A five-year scholarship grant totalling $12,500, made in 1957 by the Trustees of 
Houston Endowment, Inc. These scholarships, not to exceed $750' to any recipient, 
are awarded on the basis of academic promise, leadership potential, and economic 
need. Annual reports, including a progress report on all students receiving aid, are to 
be made to the Trustees of Houston Endowment, Inc. 

The Charles James Juhan Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $20,000, the gift from Mrs. Alfred I. duPont, as a memorial to Lieutenant 
Charles James Juhan, son of the Rt. Rev. Frank A. Juhan, D.D. The income to 
be used as a scholarship through the years for a friend or friends of Charles or their 
descendants. 

The George Shall Kausler Scholarship 

The income from $7,448.75, established in 1938 by Mrs. George S. Kausler, of 
New Orleans, La., in memory of her husband. To assist in the education of a needy 
boy. When possible, a New Orleans or Louisiana youth to be favored. The recipient 
to know in whose name the s'cholarship functions. 

The Frank Hugh Kean Scholarship 

A fund of $2,025, established in 1959 by Frank Hugh Kean, Jr., and his sister, Mrs. 
Edward Duer Reeves, in memory of their father, Frank Hugh Kean, of Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana. The income from the fund is to help needy students in the College. 

The Estes Kefauver-Edmund Orgill Scholarship 

A fund of $20,000, established 1965, by the Edmund Orgill family of Memphis, 
Tennessee, in honor of Senator Estes Kefauver. The income from this fund will be 
awarded to needy and worthy students, especially those interested in Political Science. 



150 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Tlie James S. Kemper Scholarships 

The James S. Kemper Foundation of Chicago has selected The University of the 
South to award James S. Kemper Scholarships. These are four-year scholarships 
valued at $3,800 each, to be apportioned at the rate of $950 per year for each of the 
student's four years in Sewanee. One of these scholarships will be awarded each year 
to an entermg freshman who possesses clearly superior qualifications and who plans 
definitely to make a career in some branch of insurance administration. As a part 
of his educational program, each Kemper Scholar will work in an insurance office 
during his summer vacations; after graduation he will be assisted by the Kemper 
Foundation in finding employment with a mutual insurance company or inspection 
bureau. A Scholar's acceptance of the benefits of the award, both at the time of his 
appointment and at the beginning of each year of his college career, will be evidence 
of his sincere intention to adhere to the program; it is in no way binding. 

The Minna Ketchum Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $1,000, to be used as a scholarship for mountain boys. Es- 
tablished in 193 1 by the Convocation of Scranton of the Diocese of Bethlehem. 

The Overton Lea, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the bequest of the late Overton Lea, of Nashville, as a 
memorial to his son, Overton Lea, Jr., an alumnus of this University. 

The James Coates Lear Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $10,000, established in 1963 by friends of James Coates Lear, an alumnus 
of this University who resided in Washington, D. C, at the time of his death. 

The Hinton Fort Longino Scholarship 

The income from $18,225 established by Hinton Fort Longino of Atlanta, Georgia, 
an honorary alumnus, trustee, and regent, to aid needy and worthy students. The 
selection of the beneficiaries will be based upon scholarship and upon such qualities 
as idealism, honesty, stability, intellectual curiosity, and a willingness to work. 

The award may be either a loan or a gift, but the donor hopes that a student who 
receives a gift will later contribute an equal amount so that other students may be 
benefited. 

The Louise Black MacDougald Scholarship 

A fund of $8,000, bequeathed to the University under the will of Louise Black 
MacDougald of Atlanta, Georgia, the income from which is to aid worthy students 
who need it and are in training or being educated for the Episcopal ministry. 

The Charles Pollard Marks Memorial Scholarship 

An annual award by Charles Caldwell Marks to perpetuate and promote the ideals 
of his father. The recipient shall be the Junior Gownsman selected by the faculty 
as the outstanding man in personal honor and integrity, moral character, leadership, 
friendliness of democratic attitude, and good scholarship. 

The William Leak Marshall, Jr., Scholarship 

The income from $6,000, established by the will of Mrs. Mirta M. Marshall as a 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE COLLEGE I5I 

memorial to her nephew. To be awarded by the Vice-Chancellor to some needy and 
worthy student, with preference being given residents of the Diocese of North Caro^ 
Una. The recipient may be a student in the College if he has satisfied the Vice- 
Chancellor that he intends to study for the ministry. 

The Morris and Charles Moorman Scholarship 

The income from ^14,100, established in 1954, by Mrs. Charles H. Moorman of 
Louisville, Kentucky, as a memorial to her sons, Morris and Charles. The beneficiary 
of this scholarship is to be appointed by the Vice-Chancellor. 

The Mary Rawlinson Myers Scholarship 

The income from $1,000, a bequest by Mrs. Mary Rawlinson Myers, of Charlotte, 
North Carolina, to be used in assisting young men studying or preparing for the 
ministry. 

The Lewis C. Nelson Scholarship 

The income from a fund of $S,ooo, established 1932, to be used in paying the tuition 
and if necessary the support of young men when in actual attendance as students in 
preparation for the ministry, or for assisting a young man in his preliminary edutation 
upon written statement of his intention to prepare himself for the ministry. 

The Northern Students' Scholarship 

The income from a fund of $3,331.66 originated by the Sigma Phi Fraternity to 
assist worthy students from the North. Beneficiaries to be appointed by the Vice- 
Chancellor from residents of Northern states. 

The Thomas O'Connor Scholarship 

The income from $10,000, established 1924, bequeathed to the University by Mrs. 
Fannie Renshaw O'Connor in memory of her husband; to be awarded on the basis of 
academic attainment, the beneficiary to be nominated annually by the faculty to the 
Vice-Chancellor. 

The Burr James Ramage Scholarship 

Under the will of Mrs. Harriet Page Ramage there was bequeathed the sum of 
$8,687.81 for the purpose of establishing a scholarship in the academic course for such 
students and under such conditions, limitations, rules and regulations as the faculty of 
the University may from time to time adopt. The said scholarship shall be known as 
the Burr James Ramage Scholarship as a permanent memorial to her late husband. 

The John G. and Fannie F. Ruge Scholarships 

Three scholarships of $500 each to be awarded annually for twenty years, begin- 
ning in 1947, established by Mr. John G. Ruge and his wife, Mrs. Fannie F. Ruge, of 
Apala'chicola, Florida. To be awarded to students from Florida who are members of 
the Episcopal church and who have achieved the highest rating in scholarship and 
general activities in the Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior classes of the College during 
the preceding year, the winners of said awards to be determined by the Faculty of the 
College. 



152 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The Ernst Rust, Jr., Scholarship 

A fund of $2,570, the gift of Antoinette and Ernst Rust, of Columbus, Georgia, 
for a scholarship as a living memorial to their son, a former student of this Univer- 
sity. The income is to be used for the benefit of an upperclassman in this University. 

The William G. and Marie Selby Scholarships 

An annual award of $4,800 from the William G. and Marie Selby Foundation to 
provide scholarship-loan grants to talented young men, primarily in the various fields 
of science, who because of financial need would be deprived of an advanced education. 
Some preference will be given brilliant and deserving Sarasota and Florida students. 
Each Selby Scholar will normally be required to repay one half his annual grant, 
without interest, over a forty-month period, starting one year after graduation. 

The Bettye Hunt Selden Scholarship 

The mcome from $6,751.94, established In 1962 by Selden Henry in memory of his 
grandmother. The recipient of this scholarship Is to be appointed by the Vlce- 
Chancellor. 

The Cecil Sims, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

The Cecil Sims, Jr., Scholarship is a scholarship fund established by Mr. and Mrs. 
Cecil Sims of Nashville, Tennessee, In memory of their son, Cecil Sims, Jr., a former 
student of The University of the South, who was killed in attion in France in World 
War II. These funds are to aid worthy students to pay their way through the Uni- 
versity to such an extent and in such a manner as may be determined by the Vlce- 
Chancellor. 

The Adair Skipwith Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $3,000, bequeathed to the University by Miss Kate A. Skipwith of Ox- 
ford, Mississippi, the Income to be used for scholarships awarded in memory of Adair 
Skipwith, who was one of the nine students present at the opening of the University. 

The Algernon Sydney Sullivan Scholarships 

An annual donation for ten scholarships, established In 1937 by the Algernon 
Sydney Sullivan Foundation and for the Sullivan Medallion Awards, made by the 
New York Southern Society. The requirement to qualify for these scholarships is 
that the student, after reading the biography of Algernon Sydney Sullivan, write an 
essay on moral Ideals, 

The John Potter Torian Student Loan Fund 

A fund of $1,900, established in 1940 by friends to honor the memory of a be- 
loved Sewanee alumnus, John Potter Torian. This fund to be a loan fund to help 
worthy students needing assistance. 

The Vernon Southall Tupper Scholarship 

A fund of $15,000, established in 1945 by the friends of Mr. Vernon S. Tupper of 
Nashville, Tennessee, an alumnus of this University, In recognition of his many con- 
tributions to civic, religious, educational, and welfare activities, the income from 
which is to be awarded as s'cholarshlps by the VIce-Chancellor to young men of 
character and Intellectual promise. 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE COLLEGE 1^3 

The Leila E. Werlein Scholarship 

A fund of $2,000, bequeathed to the University under the will of Leila E. Werlein, 
of Houston, Texas, for helping poor boys who wish to study for the ministry. 

The Georgia M. Wilkins Scholarship 

A fund of $953,078.37 estabHshed by Miss Georgia M. Wilkins of Columbus, 
Georgia. The income from this fund is to provide aid for needy, worthy, and qualified 
students. The recipient must demonstrate high character, a sense of responsibility, 
leadership, and academic competence. The recipients of these awards will be designated 
as Wilkins Scholars. The Director of Admissions upon request will send a descriptive 
brochure giving full information. 

The Laurence Moore Williams Scholarship 

The income from $20,000, established in 1934 by the wife, son, and daughter of 
Lawrente Moore Williams, a devoted alumnus of the University; to be used for fur- 
thering the interests of the University, preference being given to its use as a partial 
scholarship for one or more worthy, needy students; the beneficiaries to be nominated 
by the Vice-Chancellor. 



Other Scholarship Funds 

In addition to the proceeds from the scholarship funds listed above, scholarships 
are awarded from the principal of cash gifts designated for scholarship purposes. The 
amounts and the sources of these gifts vary from year to year. Such scholarships are 
awarded in the same manner as other scholarships. 

In some instances cash gifts are received to be used as scholarships for specified 
Individuals; the students concerned must be approved by the Faculty Committee on 
Admissions and Scholarships to receive scholarship aid. 

Eligibility for Scholarship Aid 

A student entering the College as a freshman may apply for any of the scholar- 
ships offered; his eligibility to receive a scholarship is determined by the Committee 
on Admissions and Scholarships after exammation of his credentials. 

To retain a scholarship, any student must meet all of the requirements established 
by the College Fatuity. In general, any scholarship holder must maintain an academic 
average of C or better each semester. Should his average fall below B in any 
semester, his scholarship may be classified as a service scholarship during the following 
semester, and he may be called upon to do a small amount of work averaging three 
to five hours per week, for the University. 

A scholarship will be cancelled if the holder gets married, acquires an automobile, or 
makes other expenditures which are felt to be unnecessary or unjustified. Requests 
for exceptions in individual cases may be considered, but reasons for making ex'ceptions 
should be compelling. 

Scholarship Applications 

Each entering freshman or transfer student applying for a scholarship, regardless of 
kind, must do the following: 

I. Submit a complete application for admission to the College. 



154 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

2. Have submitted by his parents or guardian a Confidential Financial Statement 
to the College Scholarship Service. 

3. Take the College Entrance Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude Test not 
later than February of the year in which he is applying (the January test is pre- 
ferred.) 

The forms for making application for admission and for a scholarship may be 
obtained from the Director of Admissions. It is expetted that most scholarship funds 
will be awarded to those applying before March i, though some fimda may remain 
for late applicants. Students receiving financial aid must re^apply each spring by 
submitting new financial statements; the necessary forms may be obtained from the 
Director of Admissions. 

Work Opportunities 

Approximately fifty part-time jobs are available on the campus. Most of these 
jobs require eight hours of work a week and pay $150 a year the first year and 
^2C0 a year thereafter. Application for these jobs should be made to the Director of 
Admissions. 

In addition to the jobs above, students wait on tables in the dining hall. Be- 
cause of the added responsibility and time required in these jobs, stipends for satis- 
factory work are between $400 and $500 a year. 

Since Sewanee is a very small town, there are few opportunities for work outside 
the University. 

Student Loan Funds 

The University has established, from various sources, a Student Loan Fund. Loans 
from this fund may be made to needy and worthy students who have been approved 
to receive such loans. 



SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 

Certain scholarships are available to help meet the expenses of stu- 
dents in the School of Theology. Except in the case of diocesan funds, 
for which nominations are made directly by the Bishop, applications 
for aid should be made to the Dean, accompanied by a full statement 
of the financial situation of the applicant. 

The Abram Martin Baldwin and Elizabeth Ewin Baldwin Scholarship 

The Income from a fund of $16,042.17, established in 1952 by their children in 
memory of their parents, toi be used to aid theological students from the state of Ala- 
bama, preference being given to members of the Church of the Ascension, Montgomery. 

The Barlow-Brown Scholarship 

The income from $39,520.37, a bequest from the estate of Dr. Alice Barlow-Brown 
of Corpus Christi, Texas, to be used for loans and grants to worthy students studying 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 155 

for the ministry. Preference is given to students from the State of Arkansas who shall 
be designated by the Bishop of Arkansas. Upon agreement of the Vice-Chancellor 
and the Dean of the Theological School, the income may be assigned to students from 
other dioceses. 

The Percy Brown, Sr., Scholarship 

The income from ^6,000 given by Mr. and Mrs. George Garvin Brown, Louisville, 
Kentucky, in memory of Mrs. Brown's father, Percy Brown, Sr., to be used as scholar- 
ship aid for students in the School of Theology. 

The Bishop Burton Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $6,590, a fund established by the Diocese of Lexington in 1935, 
to be used to aid theological students, preference being given students from the 
Diocese of Lexington. 

The Agnes Z. Carpenter Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $51,200, for students from the Diocese of Mississippi, preference 
being given to students from Trinity Parish, Natchez. Established 1934. 

Bishop Carruthers Memorial Scholarship 

This scholarship was established in 1961 with an initial gift of $2,050 from the 
Episcopal Churchwomen of the Fourth Province In memory of Bishop Carruthers, for 
the benefit of students in the School of Theology. 

The Edmund D. Cooper Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, for a student nominated by the rector of the Church of 
the Redeemer, Astoria, Long Island, New York, or by the Chancellor or Vice- 
Chancellor of The University of the South. 

Bishop Dandridge Memorial Scholarship 

The income from gifts, amounting at present to $2,220.05, provided by many people 
as a memorial to Bishop Dandridge, for the benefit of students in the School of 
Theology. 

The Honorable and Mrs. D. W. DeHaven Memorial Scholarship 

The trust fund established in 1961 by the will of Mrs. Anna H. DeHaven of 
Memphis, Tennessee, in memory of Judge and Mrs. DeHaven, is primarily for the 
benefit of worthy students from the Diocese of Tennessee upon the recommendation 
of the Dean of the School of Theology. 

The William McClure Drane Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $8,000, the gift of Miss Myrtle Drane of Clarksville, Tennessee, 
in memory of her father, William McQure Drane, for aid to needy and deserving stu- 
dents in the School of Theology of The University of the South, to be nominated by 
the Dean or the Vice-Chancellor. 

The Jessie Ball duPont — Frank A. Juhan Theological Scholarship 

The income from $185,303, to aid worthy and needy postulants or candidates for 
Holy Orders nominated by Bishop Frank A. Juhan, or whomever Bishop Juhan may 



156 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

designate, in such numbers as the income may permit and in such amounts as worthy 
applicants may need. In the event of no nommations from Bishop Juhan, the Dean 
of the School of Theology shall nominate worthy candidates. All nominations are to 
be made at least thirty days prior to the beginning of the school session. 

The scholarships are outright gifts; but the donor hopes that the recipients, when 
they have an earning 'capacity, will pass on the same amount that they have received 
to some other student to assist in financing the education of that worthy student. 

The Grosvenor Scholarship 

The income from ^20,000, the gift of Miss Ursula Grosvenor of Southern Pines, 
North Carolina, for aid to students in the School of Theology, nominated by the Vice- 
Chancellor or the Dean. 

The Gabriel Alexander Guignard Scholarship Fund 

The income from ^25,000 established by the will of Miss Caroline Guignard of 
Columbia, South Carolina, in memory of her brother, Gabriel Alexander Guignard, to 
help with scholarships for needy students of the School of Theology. The Fund is to 
be administered by Dean Alexander or his successors and/or the Rev. Dr. C. Fitz- 
Simons Allison. Established 1959. 

The Hall Memorial Scholarship 

This fund of $15,108.56 was established in 1944 by Mr. J. Conway Hail, Mrs. Y. M. 
(Betty Hail) Massey, and Mr. J. Conway Hail, Jr., of Bates ville, Arkansas. The 
Income from this fund Is to be used for scholarship aid to students in the School of 
Theology, the beneficiary or beneficiaries to be named by the Bishop of Arkansas; 
or, should he fail to do so by August i, then the Vice-Chancellor, for the ensuing 
academic year. 

The Alice M. Hall Scholarship 

The income from $7,470.37 for University charges of a student. This fund was 
raised by faculty, students, and alumni of the School of Theology in memory of 
Alice Mary Hall, Matron, after her death on May 31, 191 3. 

The Henry C. Hall Scholarships 

The income from $10,000, the bequest of Miss Alice M. Hall in memory of her 
brother, for two students who are "candidates for Holy Orders, pursuing the full 
course leadmg to the degree of Bachelor of Divinity in the School of Tlieolog}', the 
beneficiaries to be Bachelors of Arts from some college or university approved by 
The University of the South." 

The Dr. and Mrs. Charles W. Hock Scholarship 

The income from this scholarship, established in 1962 by gifts from Dr. and Mrs. 
Charles W. Hock of Augusta, Georgia, is for the benefit of students enrolled in the 
School of Theology, first preference being given to students from the Church of the 
Good Shepherd, Augusta, Georgia, or the Diocese of Georgia. It is to be awarded at 
a time agreed upon by the school and the donor. 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 1 57 

The Sarah Foard Hume Scholarship 

The income from ^5,062.57, the bequest of Mrs. Sarah Foard Hume Lewis of 
Lexington, Tennessee, for aid to students in the School of Theology. 

The John Jay Ide Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the gift of Mrs. Dora Donner Ide of New York City, in 
memory of her husband John Jay Ide, for a student in the School of Theology nomi- 
nated by the Dean of the School of Theology or the Vice-Chancellor. 

The Kinnett Scholarship 

Scholarship awards in the amount of $16,500 given by Mr. Frank M. Kinnett, At- 
lanta, Georgia, to students in the School of Theology upon the recommendation of the 
Dean of the School of Theology or the Vice-Chancellor. 

The Theodore Hamilton Kirk Scholarship 

The income from a fund established in 1961 by a gift of $3,000 from Mrs. Julian 
C. Headley of Tallahassee, Florida, in memory of Theodore H. Kirk, is for the benefit 
of students enrolled in the School of Theology. 

The James Douglas Kirkpatrick and 
James Douglas Kirkpatrick, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

A fund of $10,000, established in 195 1 by Katharine W. Kirkpatrick of Birmingham, 
Alabama, in memory of her husband and son. 

Income from this fund is available for scholarship aid to regular students in the 
School of Theology who are postulants or candidates for Holy Orders in the Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church. Beneficiaries are to be selected by the Dean of the 
School of Theology on the basis of academic merit and financial need, special con- 
sideration being given to any descendants of the donor who may be in the School 
of Theology. 

In any year that the income Is not required for scholarships It may be used for 
turrent operating expenses of the School of Theology. 

The Louise Black MacDougald Scholarship 

A fund of $8,ooo', bequeathed to the University under the will of Louise Black Mac- 
Dougald of Atlanta, Georgia, the Income from which is to aid worthy students who 
need it and are in training or being educated for the Episcopal ministry. 

The William Leak Marshall, Jr., Scholarship 

The income from $6,000, established by the will of Mrs. MIrta M. Marshall as a 
memorial to her nephew. To be awarded by the Vice-Chancellor to some needy and 
worthy student, with preference being given residents of the Diocese of North Carolina. 
The recipient may be a student in the College if he has satisfied the Vice-Chancellor 
that he Intends to study for the ministry. 

The Maury Scholarship 

The income from $12,967.57, the gift of Mrs. Joseph E. Maury of Memphis, 
Tennessee, to be used to assist students In the School of Theology. 



158 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The Henry J. Miller, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $2,140 given in memory of Henry Miller, Jr., by his family and 
friends to assist students in The School of Theology. 

The Lewis C. Nelson Scholarship 

The income from $S,ooo, for a student in the School of Theology or for a 
student in the College nominated by the Vic&-Chancellor after submission of a 
written statement of intention to study for the mmistry. Established 1932. 

The Mr. and Mrs. Arthur P. Nesbit Scholarship 

The Income from $1,150, established In 1964 by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur P. Nesbit 
of Columbia, Tennessee, to aid students studying for the priesthood at the School 
of Theology. 

The Richard Peters Scholarship 

The Intome from $5,000, the bequest of Mrs. Mary J. Peters, for a student 
nominated by the VIce-Chancellor. 

The Annie Owsley Ralley Memorial Scholarship 

The Income from $42,604.12, established by the will of Jennie Farris Ralley King 
(Mrs. Douglass W. King), In memory of Annie Owsley Ralley. This scholarship to 
be used to assist students in the School of Theology from the state of Kentucky or 
from San Antonio, Texas, or from the Diocese of West Texas. The awards shall rotate 
should there be qualified students from the three regions. 

The John G. and Fannie F. Ruge Scholarships 

Two scholarships of $500 each to be awarded annually for twenty years, beginning 
m 1947, established by Mr. John G. Ruge and his wife, Mrs. Fannie F. Ruge, of 
Apalachlcola, Florida. To be awarded by the University to needy theological stu- 
dents of exemplary moral character on their application therefor and on the recom- 
mendation of the Protestant Episcopal Bishop of Florida and the Dean of the 
School of Theology. 

The St. Stephen's Scholarships 

An annual grant of $400 from St. Stephen's Parish, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for 
aid to theological students nominated by the Dean of the School of Theology. 

The C. Griffith Sharkey Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $1,443.05, established in 1963 by the gift of $1,000 given to the 
glory of God and In loving memory of C, Griffith Sharkey by his family and friends, 
is for the benefit of students In the School of Theology. Each year a student will be 
nominated by the parents, the Rev. and Mrs. William L. Sharkey. In the event they 
have no nomination, the decision will rest with the Dean of the School of Theology. 

The Warren W. Taylor, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

The income from a fund established in 1964 with an initial gift of $8,700 from Mr. 
and Mrs. Warren W. Taylor and Miss Lenore F. Taylor of Nashville, Tennessee, in 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 159 

memory of their son and brother, Warren W. Taylor, Jr. This scholarship is to be 
awarded when the invested funds can provide a tuition scholarship for a student of 
the School of Theology seeking a Bachelor of Divinity degree and Holy Orders in 
the Episcopal Church. The rector, wardens, and vestry of St. George's Church, 
Nashville, Tennessee, are to assist in the selection of the beneficiary. 

The Martiii R. Tilson Scholarship 

Funded by securities of a face value of ^500 in debenture bonds carrying a 6 percent 
interest rate with an indicated return of $30.00 per annum, payable semiannually; the 
fund being managed by the donor corporation, which desires that its name be withheld. 

The Annie Overton Treadwell Scholarship 

The income from $10,000, a bequest of Miss Annie Overton Treadwell, to be used 
for scholarships for needy and deserving students in the School of Theology. 

The Leila E. Werlein Scholarship 

A fund of $2,000, bequeathed to the University under the will of Leila E. Werlein 
of Houston, Texas, for helping poor boys who wish to study for the ministry. 



Diocesan Scholarships 

Atlanta The Alston Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $67,758.85, the bequest of Mrs. Caro duBignon Alston of Atlanta, 
Georgia, to provide one or more scholarships, the recipients of which are to be chosen 
by the Bishop of the Diocese of Atlanta and the Rector of St. Luke's Episcopal 
Churth, Atlanta, Georgia. The beneficiaries of the scholarships shall be students 
studying for the ministry either in the College of Arts and Sciences or in the School 
of Theology of The University of the South. 

The Laura Hoadley Humphrey Scholarship 

The income from $6,100, the bequest of Mrs. Laura Hoadley Humphrey of La 
Grange, Georgia, for a postulant or postulants from the Diocese of Atlanta and 
nominated by the Bishop of Atlanta. The beneficiaries are "morally bound to serve 
said Diotese" after their ordination for the time equivalent to that during which 
they were beneficiaries. 

The St. Thomas' Scholarship 

A fund established in 1963 in the amount of $3,750 by St. Thomas' Church, 
Columbus, Georgia, for the benefit of the students of the School of Theology upon the 
nomination of the Bishop of Atlanta. 

Florida The Bishop Juhan Scholarship 

The income frrom $5,667.90, established in 1950 by the Diocese of Florida, to be 
paid annually to a student or students In the School of Theology from the Diocese 
of Florida who shall be nominated by the Bishop of the Diocese of Florida. 



l60 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The Fred G. Yerkes, Jr., Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the gift of Mr. and Mrs. Fred G. Yerkes, Sr., in de- 
votion to their son, the Reverend Fred G. Yerkes, Jr., to be used in the payment of 
the expenses of a postulant or candidate for Holy Orders from the Diocese of Florida, 
preparing for the sacred ministry at The University of the South, and to be awarded 
by the Bishop of the Diocese of Florida or by the Vice-Chancellor of The University 
or the South. 

The Fred G. Yerkes, Sr., Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the gift of the Reverend Fred G. Yerkes in memory 
of his father, Fred G. Yerkes, Sr.; to be used in the payment of the expenses of 
a postulant or candidate for Holy Orders, preferably from the Diocese of Florida, 
preparing for the sa'cred ministry at The University of the South, and to be awarded 
by the Bishop of the Diocese of Florida or by the Vice-Chancellor of The University 
OF THE South. 

Georgia The Waldburg Scholarship 

The income from $15,100, the bequest of Mrs. E. L. W. Clinch, for students nomi- 
nated by the Bishop of Geoigia. 

Kentucky The Kentucky Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the gift of Mrs. T. U. Dudley in memory of Bishop 
Dudley, former Chancellor of the University, for a student nominated by the 
Bishop of Kentucky. 

Mississippi The Robert Andrew Hargrove Memorial Scholarship 

The income from $3,000, the gift of Mrs. Louise B. Hargrove, for a student 
nominated by the Bishop of Mississippi. 

North Carolina The Leonidas Ledbetter Little Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the gift of Mrs. L. L. Little of Ansonville, North Caro- 
lina, in memory of her husband, for a student nominated by the Bishop of North 
Carolina. Established 192 1. 

South Carolina The Dr. William Egleston Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, established by the will of Dr. William Egleston of 
Hartsville, South Carolina. The beneficiary shall be nominated by the Bishop of 
South Carolina but if the Bishop of South Carolina does not nominate anyone, the 
nomination may be made by the Bishop of Upper South Carolina or, in default 
thereof, by the Vice-Chancellor. 

Tennessee The Barnwell Scholarship 

The Income from $6,045, the bequest of Mrs. Isabelle C. Barnwell, for a student 
nominated by the Bishop of Tennessee. 

The Augustus Hammond Robinson Scholarship 

The income from $10,000, the gift of Mrs. Delia B. Robinson of Nashville, Tennes- 
see, in memory of her husband, for a student nominated by the Bishop Coadjutor 
of Tennessee. Established 1933. 



OTHER SOURCES OF AID i6j 

Upper South Carolina The St. Andrew's Scholarship 

The income from $10,000, the bequest of Mrs. C. M. Manigault, for two students, 
one nominated by the Bishop of South Carolina, the other by the Bishop of Upper 
South CaroHna. 

Virginia The Reverend Robert South Barrett Scholarship 

The income from $5,000, the gift of Dr. Robert S. Barrett of Alexandria, Virginia, 
in memory of his father, the Reverend Robert South Barrett, D.D., for a student 
nominated by the Bishop of Virginia. 

OTHER SOURCES OF AID 

The Caro Zimmerman Cleveland Scholarship 

The income from $3,000, the gift of the Misses Zimmerman of Eutaw Springs, 
South Carolina. Administered by St. Luke's Brotherhood for the increase of the 
ministry. Established 1904. 

DuBose Scholarship 

Income from endowment funds established by the assets of the DuBose Memorial 
Church Training School of Monteagle, Tennessee, to assist postulants who are thirty- 
two years of age or older to attend Episcopal seminaries. 

The Evangelical Education Society 

This organization of the Protestant Episcopal Church awards financial grants to 
theological students. Application for financial assistance must be made to the society 
by February 15 in order to be considered for the following academic year. 

Knights Templar Educational Foundation of Georgia 

Awards have been granted from time to time to seminarians from Georgia as an 
expression of the interest and high regard of Masons for young men who devote their 
lives to the service of God and humanity. These awards are made only on the nomi- 
nation of the Dean upon request from the Foundation. 

Society for the Increase of the Ministry 

Grants-in-aid have been awarded by the Society to needy students certified by their 
Bishop and the Dean of the School of Theology. 

The St. Luke's Brotherhood for the Increase of the Ministry 

Organized in November, 1892, by alumni and students of the School of Theology. 
Its object is to increase and to improve the supply of candidates for Holy Orders, 
and in case of need to assist and encourage any who are pursuing studies toward 
that end in the University, 

The Teagle Foundation, Incorporated 

A grant of $10,000 to The University of the South for theological scholarships 
for the academic year 1964-65. This grant has been received for the past several 
years and has been of aid to many grateful students. 



11 



l62 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 



EMPLOYMENT 



A very limited amount of employment Is available for credit against 
University charges. Students needing such help should present their 
cases to the Dean. There are very few opportunities for earning money 
outside the University. 



MEDALS AND PRIZES 

The following medals and prizes are awarded annually, subject to 
the conditions noted under the respective subjects: 

College of Arts and Sciences 

1. The Ruggles- Wright Medal 

(For Frenth), founded by Mrs. Ruggles-Wright, of New Jersey. 

2. The Isaac Marion Dwight Medal 

(For Philosophical and Biblical Greek), founded by H. N. Spencer, M.D., of St. 
Louis, Mo., awarded annually, and open to all students of the University. 

3. The E. G. Richmond Prize 

(For Social Science), founded by the late E. G, Richmond, of Chattanooga, Tenn., 
consists of books, to the value of twenty-five dollars. Awarded annually to that stu- 
dent with the best record for two years' work in political, sociological, and economic 
studies. 

4. The South Carolina Medal 

(For Latin), founded by Walter Guerry Green, of Charleston, S. C. 

5. The Guerry Award 

(For English), founded by the late Vice-Chancellor Alexander Guerry, of Se- 
wanee, Tenn. 

6. The Algernon Sydney Sullivan Medallion 

(For character), established by The New York Southern Society, New York City. 

7. The Susan Beatty Memorial Prize 

(For Chemistry), awarded annually to the student who makes the greatest Improve- 
ment in General Chemistry. 

8. The Allen Farmer Award 

(For Forestry), awarded to the senior forestry student who has given outstanding 
service and shown a deep interest in the ideals and purposes of the University and 
the Forestry Department. 



medals and awards 163 

The School of Theology 

1. The George Thomas Shettle Prize 

Founded by the Rev. George Thomas Shettle of Hunsingore House, Weatherby, 
England. A prize of $25.00 offered annually to a Senior for the best reading of one 
of the Prayer Book Services selected by the Faculty. 

2. The Isaac Marion Dwight Medal 

Founded by H. N. Spencer, M.D., of St. Louis, Mo., awarded annually for ex- 
cellence in Greek and open to all students of the University. 



AIR FORCE ROTC MEDALS AND AWARDS 

The following medals and awards are presented annually to Air Force 
ROTC cadets for outstanding achievement while enrolled in the 
AFROTC program: 

1. The Professor of Air Science Medal 

(For outstanding contribution of service), founded by Lt. Col. W. Flinn Gilland, 
USAF, first PAS at the University. 

2. The General L. Kemper Williams Medal 

(For the most outstanding senior cadet), founded by Gen. L. Kemper Williams, 
New Orleans, La., former chairman of the Board of Regents. 

3. The Air Force Association Award 

(For the most outstanding junior cadet), founded by the Air Force Association. 

4. The Kirby-Smith Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy Medal 

(For the most outstanding sophomore cadet), founded by the KIrby-Smlth Chapter, 
U. D. C, Sewanee, Tennessee. 

5. The Bonholzer-Campbell Post, American Legion, Medal 

(For the most outstanding freshman cadet), founded by the Bonholzer-Campbell 
Post, American Legion, Sewanee, Tennessee. 

6. The Guerry Scholarship Award 

(For the highest academic record), founded by Col. Alex Guerry, Jr., USAFR, Chat- 
tanooga, Tennessee. 

7. The Chicago Tribune Gold and Silver Medals 

(For outstanding achievement and character, three medals, one to a cadet in each 
of the junior, sophomore, and freshman classes), founded by The Chicago Tribune ^ 
Chicago, 111. 



REGISTER 



l66 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

SUMMER INSTITUTE 1964 

Bauman, Jon Jay, B.S., (Hamline University) Wheat on, Minn. 

Canton, Keith Darrell, B.S., (Moorhead State College) Port Orchard, Wash. 

Chambers, Clyde Frank, Jr., B.S., (Western Michigan University) 

Delray Beach, Fla. 

Chambers, Walter Blevins, Jr., BlA., (Maryville College) St. Andrew's, Tenn. 

Croneberger, Charles Leslie, Jr., B.S., (Millersville State College) . . Pine Grove, Pa. 

Daring, Douglas, B.S., (State University of New York) Rochester, N. Y. 

Dickens. Mrs. Arenthia Tatum, B.A., (North Carolina College) Roxboro, N. C. 

Driskill, William David, B'.S., (Murray State College) Murray, Ky. 

Ensminger, Andrew Jackson, IV, B.S., (University of Tennessee) . . . Rockledge, Fla. 

Ervin, Clinton Lamar, B.S., (University of Tennessee) Sewanee, Tenn. 

Fasick, Miss Helen Ann, A.B., (Woman's College, Univ. of N. C.) . . Monroe, N. C. 

Fields, Ray Kendig, A.B., (Lebanon Valley College) Middlesex, N. J. 

Hanson, Hjalmer Martin, B.S., (Wistonsin State College) Barron, Wise. 

Harris, Edward Bledsoe, Jr., B.A., (The University of the South) .... Marietta, Ga. 

Hillin, Jean Austin, B.S., (Stephen F. Austin State College) Houston, Tex. 

Hubbard, Norman C, B.S., (Jacksonville State College, Ala.) Cherokee, Ala. 

Inscho, Mrs. Barbara Pickel, B.S., (Tennessee Wesleyan College) 

Kendall Park, N. J. 

Inscho, Frank Paul, A.B., (Lafayette College) Kendall Park, N. J. 

Johnston, Ronald Travis, B.S., (Southwest Texas State College) . . San Benito, Tex. 

Joslin, Paul Harold, B.S., (Cornell University) Elba, N. Y. 

Kelley, The Rev. Paul Bernard, B.S., (Crelghton University), S.T.B. . . Elkhorn, Neb. 

Kelly, Charles Harvey, A.B., (Villa Madonna College) Burlington, Ky. 

Lane, Mrs. Janis Smith, B.A., (Florence State College) Huntsville, Ala. 

Lash, Miss Marilyn Kaye, B.S., (Illinois State University) Hinsdale, HI. 

Lee, Peter Leonard, B.S., (Mankato State College) Rock Falls, III. 

Long, Robert Mittelsteadt, B.A., (The University of the South) Rome, Ga. 

MacKeith, Frank Maitland, A.B., (Lafayette College) Houston, Tex. 

Maddox, William Lucas, B.S., (University of Kentucky) Florence, Ky. 

Martin, James Sinclair, BA., (Vanderbilt University) South Salem, N. Y. 

Murolo, Mrs. Elizabeth Podgwaite, B.S., (Central Conn. State College) 

Wolcott, Conn. 

Myers, Frederick Howe, Jr., B.S., (University of Georgia) Augusta, Ga. 

Parker, Mrs. John C, B.S., (Memphis State University) Bessemer, Ala. 

Parker, William Ray, B.S., (University of Florida) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Petit, Ralph Eugene, B.S., (University of South Carolma) Miami, Fla. 

PIckard, Thomas Francis, B.A., (The University of the South) .... Nashville, Tenn. 

Pietropaolo, James, B.S., (Cornell University) Canandaigua, N. Y. 

Riley, Russell Lee, B.S., (Hamline University) Madelia, Minn. 

Rollins, Kennon Patrick, B.S., (University of Tennessee) Baltimore, Md. 

Rosenman, Richard Lee, B.A., (University of Michigan) .... West Babylon, N. Y. 

Scott, James Hamilton, B.S., (The University of Georgia) Sewanee, Tenn. 

Shedd, Mrs. Annie Florine, B.S., (Tennessee A. & I. State University) . Cowan, Tenn. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1 67 

Sheridan, Philip Ogden, B.A., (Jersey City State College) Butler, N. J. 

Shirk, George Bernard, B.A., (Augustana College) Geneseo, III. 

Sigler, Emory Alvln, Jr., B.S., (North Texas State College) Piano, Tex. 

Sparks, Mrs. June Roselle, A.B., (Randolph-Macon Woman's College) 

Fountain Inn, S. C. 
Speegle, Kenneth Lyle, B.S., (Middle Tennessee State College) . St. Andrew's, Tenn. 

Staton, William Robert, B.S., (Concord College) Mullens, W. Fa. 

Stephens, Larry Keith, B.A., (Middle Tennessee State College) Hemet, Calif. 

Storey, Galen Van Dorn, Jr., B.A., (Jacksonville State College, Ala.) 

South Pittsburg, Tenn. 
Thomas, Mrs. Barbara Williams, B.S,, (Arkansas State College) 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Trepanler, Miss Sybil Eileen, B.S., (Michigan State University) . . Jppleton, Wise. 

Washbon, Edwin Carson, B.S., (Cornell University) Ithaca, N. Y. 

Weaver, Vernon Herr, A.B., (Upland College) Fan Nuys, Calif. 

Wilson, John William, B.S., (Michigan State University) Poway, Calif. 

Wmkky, William D., B.S., (State University of New York) Horseheads, N. Y. 

Woods, Arthur Edward, B.S., (Tennessee A. & I. State Univ.) . . Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Yellin, Mrs. Mildred Bromberg, A.B., (Montclair State College) . . Springfield N. J. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 1964 

Ball, Edmund Rhett Nashville, Tenn. 

Beaumont, Henry Francis Sewanee, Tenn. 

Beneke, Henry, HI Columbus, Miss. 

Bennett, Miss Elizabeth Donaldson Winchester, Tenn. 

(Middle Tennessee State College) 

Blount, Winton Malcolm, HI Montgomery, Ala. 

Boyd, John William Cowan, Tenn. 

(Tennessee Polytechnic Institute) 

Brine, George Atkins Morganton, N. C. 

Brown, Miss Molly Bennett Orange, Tex. 

(Vanderbllt University) 

Bryan, Carter Byrd Jacksonville, Fla. 

(Newberry College) 

Bryan, Jacob Franklin, IV Jacksonville, Fla. 

Buntin, John Craighead Nashville, Tenn. 

Butler, David Arthur Tallahassee, Fla. 

Callaway, James Gaines, III Kansas City, Mo. 

Cameron, Douglas Winston Sewanee, Tenn. 

Carlisle, Carson Campbell, Jr Nashville, Tenn. 

(Washington and Lee) 

Cawthon, William Stanmore Tallahassee, Fla. 

Chambers, Miss Judith McLendon Columbia, Tenn. 

(Centre College) 

Conder, John Alves San Diego, Calif. 

Cooper, Donald Bryant Mullins, S. C. 

Corrow, Robert Edward Marshfield, Mass. 

Costello, William, III West Islip, N. Y. 



1 68 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Crais, Miss Martha Louise Birmingham, Ala. 

(Mississippi State College for Women) 

Darlington, Alan Bloomington, III. 

Davis, Daniel Muncaster Marion, Ohio 

Dickinson, Jacob McGavock, IV O'Fallen, III. 

Doyle, James Marshall Memphis, Tenn. 

(Re-entering from University of Tennessee) 

Drayton, Joseph William, Jr Ridgewood, N. J. 

Duncan, Kyle Edward Neptune Beach, Fla. 

Emison, Miss Jenny Easley Memphis, Tenn. 

(Southwestern at Memphis) 

Estes, Stephen Sandford Rome, Ga. 

Ewing, Randy Lew fonesboro, La. 

(Louisiana State University) 

Ewing, Terry Oliver Jonesboro, La. 

Fite, William Howard Port St. Joe, Fla. 

Fitzhugh, William Jordan, Jr Yazoo City, Miss. 

Forbes, James Tuck Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Freeman, Frank Alexander Sezuanee, Tenn. 

(The Citadel) 

Gibson, Ben Wright, III Sezuanee, Tenn. 

Gooding, John Bernard, Jr Savannah, Ga. 

Graham, Samuel Russell Austin, Tex. 

Grant, Danny Ray Winchester, Tenn. 

Gregg, Alan Townley St. Michaels, Md. 

Guiteras, George Patrick Gainesville, Fla. 

Haddaway, John Arthur Dallas, Tex. 

(University of Miami) 

Hanahan, Bulst Lucas Charleston, S. C. 

Harrison, James Harrell, Jr Pensacola, Fla. 

Hartman, Jon Merrill Dallas, Tex. 

Harwell, Jess Alfred, III Fort Worth, Tex. 

Haslbauer, Miss Gretchen Theresa N orris, Tenn. 

(University of Tennessee) 

Heck, Samuel Leroy Chestertozvn, Md. 

(Washington College) 
Hehmeyer, Philip Leland Memphis, Tenn. 

(Re-entering) 

Henry, Robert Evelyn Greenville, S. C. 

Herring, Robert Freeman, III Nezunan, Ga. 

Hickman, Ralph Jack Midland, Tex. 

Hight, Gordon Lee Rome, Ga. 

Hughes, Evan Griffith Columbus, Ohio 

Hunt, William Thurman Crawford Houston, Tex. 

Hurst, Robert Joseph Harlingen, Tex. 

(Re-entering from Del Mar College) 

Israel, Richard Edson Hutchinson, Kan. 

John, Sister Mary, C. S. M Sezuanee, Tenn. 

Johnson, Randall Stuart Polos Verdes Estates, Calif. 

Jordan, Ingersoll Nezu Orleans, La. 

Joslyn, Harry Pennington, III Wilmington, Del. 

Keith, Julian Parke Selma, Ala. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1 69 

Kellermann, Joseph Lodge, Jr Charlotte, N. C. 

Kelly, William Palmer Tallahassee, Fla. 

Keana, Henry Gordon, III Memphis, Tenn. 

Kicklighter, Joseph Allen Hawkinsville, Ga. 

King, John Smith, III Memphis, Tenn, 

Kirby-Smith, Miss Matilda Sewanee, Tenn, 

(Goucher College) 

Lee, Mrs. Ann Dow Germantoivn, Tenn. 

(Southwestern at Memphis) 

Lee, Robert Emerson Fort Walton Beach, Fla. 

McCord, Michael Owensby Springfield, 7a. 

(George Mason College) 

Mcllhenny, Paul Carr "New Orleans, La. 

(Tulane University) 

Mcllhenny, Sara Polk l^ew Orleans, La. 

(University of New Mexico) 

McLean, William Arden El Dorado, Ark. 

McMurrey, Robert Millard Kilgore, Tex. 

McRae, William Allan, III Jacksonville, Fla. 

Marye, Robert Franklin Signal Mountain, Tenn. 

Mays, Robert Leland, Jr Decatur, Ala. 

Metzner, Richard Max Cleveland, Tenn. 

Monaghan, Thomas Hampton, Jr Columbus, Ohio 

Moore, William Ross Crenshaw Newbern, Tenn. 

Moss, George West Natchez, Miss. 

Nelson, Harry Everette Murfreesboro, Tenn, 

(Middle Tennessee State College) 

Neville, Paul Mams ._ Meridian, Miss, 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Noel, Hayes Acklen, Jr Nashville, Tenn, 

Oakes, Herbert Lee, Jr Lookout Mountain, Tenn, 

Ostner, James Lee Memphis, Tenn, 

(Lambuth College) 

Overstreet, James Wilkins, III Savannah Beach, Ga. 

Pate, Alex Wilbum Birmingham, Ala.- 

Pearce, William, Jr Chatham Township, N. /.- 

Pegues, William Claudius LaMarque, Tex,- 

Perrin, Henry Keats Helena, Ark,. 

(The Johns Hopkins University) 

Picton, John Lowell Cincinnati, Ohio' 

Plyler, Joseph Philip Tampa, Fla. 

Powell, Richard Hays Bartlesville, Okla. 

Powers, Ernest Michael Estill Springs, Tenn. 

Provost, Miss Katharine Treutlen Columbia, Tenn. 

(University of Georgia) 

Ragland, Samuel Connelly Phoenix, Ariz. 

Rahlfs, John William, Jr Midland, Tex. 

Rainwater, Crawford Veazey, Jr Pensacola, Fla, 

Randle, Daniel Wilson Winnetka, 111, 

Ravenel, James Morris Winnsboro, S. C. 

Reece, Richard Douglas Sewanee, Tenn, 



170 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Reynolds, Edward Howell Atlanta, Ga. 

Rice, James Alexander Shreveport, La. 

(Marion Institute) 

Rowe, Rickey Cowan, Tenn. 

(Tennessee A. & I. State University) 

Rust, Roger Stuart Arlington, Va. 

Scheppe, Payton Eugene, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. 

Shepherd, James Everett Bartow, Fla. 

Smith, Gordon Emerson Nashville, Tenn. 

Spencer, James Wilbur Decherd, Tenn. 

(Middle Tennessee State College) 

Steenerson, Edward Lewis North Augusta, S. C. 

Stevens, Ralph Michael Boynton Beach, Fla. 

Stevens, Miss Sandra Nell Ocean Ridge, Fla. 

Studstill, Richard Thomas Midway Park, N. C. 

Sutton, Thomas John, III Kinston, N. C. 

Talley, Bascom Destrehan, III Bogalusa, La. 

Templeton, Miss Ann Kennedy Winchester, Tenn. 

Templeton, Miss Avery Elizabeth Winchester, Tenn. 

Templeton, Harvey Maxwell, III Winchester, Tenn. 

Templeton, Miss Susan Clark Winchester, Tenn. 

Thornton, Grover Cleveland, III Clayton, Ala. 

Thornton, John Hugh Huntsville, Ala. 

(Southwestern at Memphis) 

Thornton, William Holladay, Jr Wilmington, N. C. 

Treadwell, George Harry Mem-phis, Tenn. 

Usry, Michael Dawson Albany, Ga. 

Walker, Benjamin Pressley, IV Jacksonville, Fla. 

Wallace, Robert Ellis Allardt, Tenn. 

Weber, Miss Carol Ann Winchester, Tenn. 

(University of Tennessee) 

White, Frank Phillips, Jr Lewisburg, Tenn. 

Whitney, Richard Henry, Jr Birmingham, Ala. 

Wiggins, Charles Quintard, III Sewanee, Tenn. 

(Re-entering) 

Wllkerson, George Stevens Palm Beach, Fla. 

(Re-entering from The University of Paris) 

Wllllngham, Roderick Ronald Atlanta, Ga. 

Wilson, Paul Talbot Metairie, La. 

Worthington, Joseph Muse, III Gibson Island, Md. 

(Re-entering) 

Wright, Donald Evans Atlanta, Ga. 

Wyatt, Wilson Watkins, Jr Louisville, Ky. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS I7I 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Classification at beginning of the first semester 1964-65 

SENIORS 
(Minimum requirements: 92 sem. hrs. and 86 qual. credits) 

Adams, Jerry Bass (English) Glendde, Mo. 

Adams, Jim Dozier, Jr. (English) Spartanburg, S. C. 

Allen, Franklin Pearson, III (Economics) Memphis, Tenn. 

Baffaro, Peter Morley (English) Kent, Wash. 

Bailey, Louis Michael (English) Dothan, Ala. 

Bailey, Percival Roberts, III ( Ejiglish ) Gainesville, Ga. 

Baker, William Hodges, III (English) Richmond, Fa. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Baldwin, William Irwin, Jr. (Economics) Cincinnati, Ohio 

Ballard, Westervelt Terhune (Economics) New Orleans, La. 

Barber, Stephen Hugh (English) Birmingham, Ala. 

Bass, Francis Marion, Jr. (Political Science) Nashville, Tenn. 

Begle, Howell Edward, Jr. (Political Science) Vero Beach, Fla. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Bertrand, William Turner (Physics) Pulaski, Tenn. 

Boatwright, Purvis James, Jr. (English) Columbia, S. C. 

Borden, Robert Remington, III (English) Westport Harbor, Mass. 

Braugh, James Richard (English) Beaumont, Tex. 

Brown, Garbutt James, Jr. (Economics) Jacksonville, Fla. 

(Re-entering) 

Bryan, Jacob Franklin, IV (History) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Bums, Harry Anderson, III (English) Camden, Ala. 

Garrison, Henry (Seorge, III (English) Rembert, S. C. 

Gass, Robert Howard (English) Macon, Ga. 

Ghesley, Thomas Evan (Political Science) Mount Dora, Fla. 

Clark, John Thomas, III (Political Science) Centreville, Md. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Glarkson, Allien Boykin, Jr. (Biology) Augusta, Ga. 

Goleman, Robert Lee, Jr. ( English ) Uniontown, Ala. 

Golmore, Josephus Gonn Guild (English) Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

Goursey, James Browning (Political Science) Elkton, Ky. 

Darst, David High ( Spanish) Pinehurst, N. C. 

Daves, Reginald Forrest (Biology) Summerville, S. C. 

Davis, Daniel Muncaster (Economics) Marion, Ohio 

Deshon, George Ellis, Jr. (Biology) (Political Science) Monte Sereno, Calif. 

Dickson, James Gary (Forestry) Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Diegmann, Frank George (Biology) Hamilton, Ohio 

DIegmann, Fred Ferris (Biology) Hamilton, Ohio 

Dyas, Michael David (History) Seabrook, Tex. 

Eamon, Thomas Floyd (Political Science) Durham, N. C. 

Edwards, Bingham David (Political Science) Decatur, Ala. 

Ehlert, William Rowe (Biology) Selma, Ala. 

Folbre, James DuBose, Jr. (Economics) San Antonio, Tex. 



172 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Freeman, Judson, Jr. (English) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Fretwell, John Bagster (English) Coral Gables, Fla. 

Furtwangler, William Alexander Cunnington (English) Charleston, S. C. 

Goodman, Charles Edward, Jr. (Chemistry) Decherd, Tenn. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Gosnell, Ernest William, Jr. (Political Science) Berryville, Fa. 

Griffith, Aubrey Daniel (French) Richmond Heights, Mo. 

Gronbeck, David (Political Science) Grand Ridge, Fla. 

Guyton, John Joseph, Jr. (Economics) Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Hall, Thomas Bryan, III (History) Kansas City, Mo. 

Hamilton, William Alvln, HI (Polltital Science) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Hann, William Graham (History) Westport, Conn. 

Hannum, Ellwood Brown (History) Dallas, Tex. 

Harrison, James Harrell, Jr. (Biology) Pensacola, Fla. 

Hart, Richard Morey, Jr. (Political Science) Pensacola, Fla. 

Hilsman, Joseph Hamilton, IH (Political Science) Atlanta, Ga. 

Hogan, Charles Edmund Kells (Economics) Brevard, N. C. 

(Re-entering after nailitary service) 

Holt, David Faulcon (English) Signal Mountain, Tenn. 

*Horne, James Arthur (Fine Arts) Coleman, Tex. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Howell, Robert Johnson (Political Science) Nashville, Tenn. 

*Hughes, Evan Griffith (Religion) Columbus, Ohio 

(Re-entering) 

Hughes, Timothy William (Forestry) Middletown, N. Y. 

Ide, Richard Ritner (Philosophy) Darien, Conn. 

James, Wyatt Edgar Frederic (English) Libertyville, III. 

Johnson, Joseph Thomas (Biology) Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Johnson, Randall Stuart (Forestry) Palos Verde s Estates, Calif. 

Jones, Albigence Waldo, Jr. (Philosophy) Finings, Ga. 

Jones, Robert Michael (English) Beaufort, S. C. 

Kendig, James Jerome (Political Science) Fairborn, Ohio 

Koger, James Alfred (English) Roswell, Ga. 

Kori, Charles William (Mathematics) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Kuhnell, Charles Robert (History) New Orleans, La. 

Lambie, John Maverick (Biology) Miami, Fla. 

Lawrence, Kennard Thomas (Political Science) Big Spring, Tex. 

(Re-entering from University of Washington) 

Lear, Allen Lawrence (Political Science) Arlington, Fa. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Lee, William Bradford (Chemistry) (Philosophy) San Antonio, Tex. 

Lefeber, Robert Randolph (Economics) Galveston, Tex. 

Little, Herbert Lindsay (English) Spartanburg, S. C. 

Lumpkin, Alexander Henderson (Physics) Rock Hill, S. C. 

MtCaughan, Mark Roland (English) Pensacola, Fla. 

McDowell, Gilmore Simms, HI (History) Charleston, S. C. 

McGinnis, Harrill Coleman (History) (Political Science) Nashville, Tenn. 

Mahoney, William James, HI (Political Science) Montgomery, Ala. 

Mann, William Stillwell, Jr. (English) Mobile, Ala. 

Maull, Frederick Howard (English) Philadelphia, Pa. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 173 

Milne, Douglas John (History) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Morrison, Donald Craig, Jr. (Political Science) Cincinnati, Ohio 

Moye, Robert James, Jr. (Biology) Swainsboro, Ga. 

Muse, Marshall Groves, III (Political Science) Longview, Tex. 

Myers, Douglass Edward, Jr. (English) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Newberry, Alpha Omega, III (Biology) Sewanee, Tenn. 

Nicholas, Joel Edward (German) Nashville, Tenn. 

Norman, Eldon Layne (Forestry) Pensacola, Fla. 

Parker, Joseph Fleming (Political Science) Greenville, S. C. 

Patton, Mitchell Albert Nevin, III (Political Science) Rome, Ga. 

Pierce, James Madison (English) Cleveland, Tenn. 

Plyler, Joseph Philip (Political Science) Tampa, Fla. 

Poe, Terrente Cean (English) Albuquerque, N. M. 

Poster, Gerbrand, III (English) Myrtle Beach, S. C. 

Powell, Richard Hays (History) Bartlesville, Okla. 

Price, Morgan Exum (English) Amarillo, Tex. 

Ravenel, James Morris (Biology) Winnsboro, S. C. 

Reynolds, Edward Howell (History) Atlanta, Ga. 

(Re-entering) 

Richards, John Mason (Spanish) Fredericksburg, Fa. 

Ross, Charles Danforth (Biology) Clarksville, Tenn. 

Rowland, Walter Thomas, III (Economics) Washington, D. C. 

Rucker, Thomas Joseph (Philosophy) Winston-Salem, N. C. 

(Re-entering from Loyola University, Rome Center, Italy) 

Russell, Howard Ewing, Jr. (Economics) Greenville, S. C. 

Sanders, Jack Palmer (Mathematics) Merriam, Kan. 

Scott, Conley Jay, II (English) Wichita, Kan. 

Scott, James Warren (Classical Languages) Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

Seiters, John Douglas (Classical Languages) Signal Mountain, Tenn. 

Semmer, John Richard (Biology) Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Speer, Michael Sheppard (History) Indianola, Miss. 

Spencer, Norman Albritton (English) Washington, D. C. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Splane, Peyton Edwards, III (History) Jesup, Ga. 

Stanford, Robert Ernest (Mathematics) (Physics) Montgomery, Ala. 

Stewart, James Robert (Forestry) Pensacola, Fla. 

Stone, Alvord Lovell, Jr. (English) Tampa, Fla. 

Stone, Tillman Price, Jr. (History) Birmingham, Ala. 

Stubblefield, Frank Weiland (Mathematics) (Physics) Franklin, Tenn. 

Sullivan, Claude Townsend, Jr. (Political Science) Greenville, S. C. 

Taylor, James, Jr. (English) Charleston, S. C. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Templeton, Harvey Maxwell, III (Economics) Winchester, Tenn. 

Thames, James Franklin (Biology) Ponte Vedra, Fla. 

Thoresen, Carl Douglas (Political Science) N orris, Tenn. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Thornton, Daniel Ingram (English) Montevallo, Ala. 

Thornton, John Pope, Jr. (English) Milledgeville, Ga. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in Frasce) 



174 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Tomb, Andrew Spencer, III (Biology) Houston, Tex. 

Tucker, Herbert Ray (Forestry) Bethel Springs, Tenn. 

Tully, James Hunt (Mathematics) Lakeland, Fla. 

Turner, Robert Harris (Economics) Miami, Fla. 

Vander Horst, John, Jr. (English) Memphis, Tenn. 

Varnell, James Lawrence (English) Sezvanee, Tenn. 

Venard, George Haskell, Jr. (French) Atlanta, Ga. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Waddell, Michael Geoffrey (English) Del Rio, Tex. 

Wade, William St. Clair (History) Greenville, N. C. 

Wallace, Robert Ellis (Economics) Allardt, Tenn. 

Waters, James Robert (Forestry) Hammond, La. 

Watson, William Doyle (Political Science) Jesup, Ga. 

Weaver, Dudley Saunders (Economics) Memphis, Tenn. 

Webb, Stephen Elliott (Political Science) Sewanee, Tenn. 

Wehman, Ernest Arnold, Jr. (Forestry) Charleston, S. C. 

Wherry, David Kenneth (Mathematics) Claremont, Calif. 

Williams, Louis Christopher (English) Nashville, Tenn. 

Wittliff, Herman Albert, HI (History) Lufkin, Tex. 

Wood, Wilbur Leon, Jr. (Biology) Alachua, Fla. 

Wright, Derril Henry (Mathematics) Lead, S. D. 

Wright, Jim Tarwater (Forestry) Louisville, Ky. 

Wright, Wilbur Thurston, Jr. (Economics) Westminster, Md. 



*Second Semester 



JUNIORS 

(Minimum requirements: 60 sem. hrs. and 54 qual. credits) 

Abemathy, James Harry, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. 

Allen, Charles Robison, Jr Gastonia, N. C. 

Anderton, John Carwell Jackson, Miss. 

Ball, Edmund Rhett Nashville, Tenn. 

^Bentley, John Richard, Jr Tyler, Tex. 

(Re-entering from Tyler Junior College) 

Best, Peter Farquhard Brevard, N. C. 

Black, Edward Barnwell Greenville, S. C. 

Boone, David Andrew Meggett, S. C. 

Brandon, John Ewing Nashville, Tenn. 

Broadfoot, Thomas Winston Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Brooks, David Kendrick, Jr Jackson, Miss. 

Bruda, James Norman Jacksonville, Fla. 

Burke, James Otey, Jr Richmond, Fa. 

Callaway, James Gaines, III Kansas City, Mo. 

Campbell, Michael Armour Sewanee, Tenn. 

Campbell, Thomas Rex, Jr White Bear Lake, Minn. 

Canada, John Bradley, Jr Aylett, Fa. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1/5 

Ganon, Robert Maurice Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Capers, John Gendron, III Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Carey, John Austm Memphis, Tenn. 

Chalaron, Pierre Rivalier Covington, La. 

Coleman, Bruce Mclsaat Uniontown, Ala. 

Coleman, Heyward Hamilton Charleston, S. C. 

Condra, Philip Andes Whitwell, Tenn. 

Covington, William DeBeriy Lakeland, Fla. 

Crow, Raymond Lee Miami, Okla. 

Darlington, Alan Bloomington, III. 

Dawson, John Holman Sumter, S. C. 

Duncan, Kyle Edward Neptune Beach, Fla. 

Engle, David Stuart San Antonio, Tex. 

Fagan, William Michael, Jr Tullahoma, Tenn. 

Feaster, Norman Brunner, II Jensen Beach, Fla. 

Fisher, Michael Wayne West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Fitch, William Babcock Columbia, S. C. 

Freeman, Pickens Noble, Jr Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Gardiner, Patrick Roberts Sewanee, Tenn. 

Gaston, Ian Frederick Chickasaw, Ala. 

Gates, William Day, II Mobile, Ala. 

Gignilliat, Eklward Harris Gainesville, Ga. 

Gignilliat, William Robert, III Gainesville, Ga. 

Gordon, Jack Elliott, Jr Claremore, Okla. 

Graham, Jerry Robert Selmer, Tenn. 

Gugelmann, Richard John Slidell, La. 

Haines, Stacy Allen, III Glencoe, III. 

Hainge, Allen Frederick Houston, Tex. 

Harrison, Burr Powell, III Leesburg, Fa. 

Harrison, John Townsend, Jr Birmingham, Ala. 

Harrison, Joseph Morgan Charleston, S. C. 

Harry, Robert Porter, Jr Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Hartley, Wayne Chandler Ft. Leavenworth, Kan. 

Helfenstein, William Luther Caribou, Me. 

Hight, Gordon Lee, II Rome, Ga. 

Hood, Robert Holmes Houston, Tex. 

Jockusch, David Julius San Antonio, Tex. 

Johnson, William Alfred Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Jones, Franklin Clifford, III Houston, Tex. 

Jordan, IngersoU New Orleans, La. 

Joslyn, Harry Pennington, III Wilmington, Del. 

Kelly, William Palmer Tallahassee, Fla. 

Kennedy, Jamesf Allen, Jr. Nashville, Tenn. 

Kinkead, Shelby Cameal, Jr Lexington, Ky. 

Ladd, Sam Gaillard Mobile, Ala. 

Lampley, Michael Ford Burns, Tenn. 

Larkin, James Ronald Huntland, Tenn. 



176 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Lincoln, Michael Bartholomew Ware, Mass. 

Lund, John Moss, Jr Swansea, Mass. 

McBride, Robert Cowham San Francisco, Calif. 

McGown, Daniel Thomas, Jr Memphis, Tenn. 

McMahon, Marshall Emet Fort Worth, Tex. 

McMilHn, FItten Lamar, Jr Little Rock, Ark. 

Martin, David Davis, III ^ Selma, Ala. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Mason, Samuel Alison Huntsville, Ala. 

Mays, Robert Leland, Jr Decatur, Ala. 

Mills, Jeffrey Alan Alexandria, Fa. 

Mislove, Michael William Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

Moore, William Kenneth Atlantic Beach, Fla. 

Moore, William Ross Crenshaw Newbern, Tenn. 

Mulkey, Bruce Ross Tullahoma, Tenn. 

(University of Tennessee) 

Munselle, William George San Angela, Tex. 

Napier, Michael Leverett Macon, Ga. 

Neville, Paul Mains Meridian, Miss. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Nichols, Edward Curtis, Jr Jackson, Miss. 

O'Connor, Frank Lynwood, Jr Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

Ohl, Charles Wallis, Jr Chickasha, Okla. 

Palomares, RIcardo, Jr Miami, Fla. 

Parmelee, Robert Alexander Austin, Tex. 

Parr, William Dean, Jr Collierville, Tenn. 

Paschall, Douglas Duane McKenzie, Tenn. 

Paterson, Allen Hackett Metairie, La. 

Patterson, Jerome Augustine, III Jacksonville, Fla. 

Peake, John Day, Jr Mobile, Ala. 

Peterson, Eric Lang St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Phillips, Peter Rhmd, Jr Houston, Tex. 

Pierce, Joseph North Cleveland, Tenn. 

Powers, Ernest Michael Estill Springs, Tenn. 

Pueschel, Charles Lynwood Lake City, Fla. 

Ray, Patrick Ryal Shelbyville, Tenn. 

Redd, William Frederick Birmingham, Ala. 

Reith, Merrill Dale, Jr Atlanta, Ga. 

Relchardt, Thomas James West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Reid, John Harland, Jr Decatur, Ga. 

(Re-entering) 

Reynolds, James Everett, Jr Grayson, Ala. 

Rice, Marshall Carl Shreveport, La. 

(Marion Institute) 

Richardson, John Holt Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Riggins, John Norman Ridgezvood, N. J. 

Roberts, John Sharp Gillespy, Jr Birmingham, Ala. 

Rowe, Edward George Saluda, S. C. 

Russell, Edward Hughes, Jr Raleigh, N. C. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1/7 

Rust, Roger Stuart Jrlington, Fa. 

Rust, Thomas Locke Jrlington, Fa. 

Saltsman, George Spraker, Jr St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Sava, Dennis Michael Amityville , N. Y. 

(Re-entering) 

Scott, John Burt Wichita, Kan. 

Seymour, Arthur Gloster, Jr Knoxville, Tenn. 

Sherer, Alfred Dean, Jr Bloomington, III. 

Sims, Richard Landon Sparta, Tenn. 

Smith, Timothy Scott Kansas City, Mo. 

Smyth, Peter Ogden Charleston, S. C. 

Spaduzzi, Paul Edward Dallas, Tex. 

Stevens, Ralph Michael Boynton Beach, Fla. 

Stevenson, Richard Jean Cincinnati, Ohio 

Sutton, David Parks Cleveland, Tenn. 

Sutton, John Thomas, III Kinston, N. C. 

Swisher, Robert Lee, Jr Ooltewah, Tenn. 

Talley, Bascom Destrehan, III Bogalusa, La. 

Tessmann, Paul John Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Thornton, John Hugh Huntsville, Ala. 

(Southwestern at Memphis) 

Trask, David Stephens Hays, Kan. 

Upton, Donald Ray Soddy, Tenn. 

Urquhart, Robert Graham Chevy Chase, Md. 

Van Doren, Robert Lawson, Jr Columbia, S. C. 

Vendrell, Alex Hector Decatur, Ga. 

Volk, Mark Juel Milwaukee, Wise. 

Wachter, Frederick Edward, Jr Painesville, Ohio 

Waddell, Thomas Edward McDonogh, Md. 

Walke, Ralph Meade Dublin, Ga. 

Wallace, Rodger Terry Allardt, Tenn. 

*Wallis, Robert Lester Albany, Ga. 

(Grays Harbor College) 

Walters, Rupert Adrian, Jr Sneads, Fla. 

Waters, Thad Howard, Jr Hammond, La. 

Watkins, David Sinclair Gary, Ind. 

Weathers, Walter Thornton, Jr Metcalfe, Miss. 

West, Thomas Marshall, IV Oklahoma City, Okla. 

(Re-entering from University of Oklahoma) 

Wheatley, Charles Hewitt Hatboro, Pa. 

Whitesell, Eric James Sewanee, Tenn. 

Wilder, Donald Adair Braintree, Mass. 

Wilkerson, George Steven ^ Palm Beach, Fla. 

(Re-entering from The University of Paris) 

Williams, James Oliver McKenzie, Tenn. 

Williams, John Randolph, Jr. . .^ Wheeling, W. Fa. 

(Re-entering after Junior Year in France) 

Wilson, James Farlow Northfield, III. 

Winslow, Richard Clarke Winter Park, Fla. 



178 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Wood, Robert Hancock, Jr Sewanee, Tenn. 

Wyatt, Wilson Watkins, Jr Louisville, Ky. 

Yagura, Peter Isao Seabrook, N. J. 



*Second Semester 

SOPHOMORES 

(Minimum requirements: 24 sem. hrs^. and 18 qual, credits) 

Abrams, Paul Trenholm Richland, Wash. 

Adair, Paul Haskins Atchison, Kan. 

Albright, William Hunter Montgomery, Ala. 

Allen, Edwin Marshall, III Florence, S. C. 

Allison, William Peel Beaumont, Tex. 

Anderson, Daniel Jacksonville Beach, Fla. 

Armbrecht, Conrad Paterson Mobile, Ala. 

Austin, Dennis Gentry Hogansville, Ga. 

(Georgia Institute of Technology) 

Bachmann, Carl Bowne Wheeling, W. Fa. 

Balsley, Thomas Taylor Reidsville, N. C. 

Bear, John Elliott Hope Hull, Ala. 

Beck, Alan Paul Fort Worth, Tex. 

Btell, Robert Kent Okeechobee, Fla. 

Berenguer, David Enrique, Jr Coral Gables, Fla. 

Blair, Conrad Allen Doraville, Ga. 

Blount, Winton Malcolm, HI Montgomery, Ala. 

Boswell, Robert Blan Montgomery, Ala. 

Bosworth, Edward Louis, HI Rome, Ga. 

Boyd, John William Cowan, Tenn. 

(Tennessee Polytechnic Institute) 

Bradley, Jerry Wayne Southern Pines, N. C. 

Brady, James Freiot Spring Grove, Fa. 

Brewer, Richard Elliott Chandler, Okla. 

Brine, George Atkins Morganton, N. C. 

Brittain, James Maddox Roanoke, Ala. 

Brown, Charles Geoffrey Roanoke, Fa. 

Brown, Donald Sterling, II Jacksonville, Fla. 

Bruce, Robert Andrews, Jr Camden, S. C. 

Brush, Charles Beeler Nashville, Tenn. 

Buchanan, David Thomas Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Burnham, Francis Richard, II Ormond Beach, Fla. 

Butler, David Arthur Tallahassee, Fla. 

Campbell, Wilburn Welles Charlotte, N. C. 

Canale, John Dominic, III Germantown, Tenn. 

Capers, Rushton Trenholm Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Carbaugh, John Edward, Jr Greenville, S. C. 

Carlisle, Carson Campbell, Jr. _ Nashville, Tenn. 

(Washington and Lee University) 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1/9 

Carson, Christopher Barrett Miami, Fla. 

Catts, Austin Everett Atlanta, Ga. 

Cavert, Peterson Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Cervone, David Merdith Knoxville, Tenn. 

Chandler, Ralph Joseph Nashville, Tenn. 

Cheney, Curtis Van, Jr Reidsville, Ga. 

Clardy, James Claborn, Jr Decherd, Tenn. 

Clewis, Richard Martin, III Tampa, Fla. 

Cole, Robert Grey Lexington, Fa. 

Conner, Ronald Parks Washington, D. C. 

Cooper, Guy Laurence, Jr Selma, Ala. 

(Re-entering) 

Crichton, Andrew Donelson Nashville, Tenn. 

Cruse, John Woolfolk Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Daily, Thomas Allen Fort Smith, Ark. 

Daniel, William Russell, Jr Fort Valley, Ga. 

Daunt, Francis Thomas Albany, Ga. 

Davenport, Mark Talbot Dallas, Tex. 

Dicus, Lawrence Milton San Antonio, Tex. 

Dolbeer, Richard Albert, Jr Jackson, Tenn. 

Doyle, James Marshall, Jr Memphis, Tenn. 

(Re-entering from Southwestern at Memphis) 

Dyson, Philip Porter Fairhope, Ala. 

Eiland, Cecil Morgan Pensacola, Fla. 

Elliott, Edward Everett, IV Oreland, Pa. 

Elliott, William Henry Meridian, Miss. 

Estes, Stephen Sandford Tampa, Fla. 

Evans, William Dunbar, III Chester, Va. 

Ewell, Arnold Edwm, II Huntsville, Ala. 

Fite, William Howard Port St. Joe, Fla. 

Fitzhugh, William Jordan, Jr Yazoo City, Miss. 

Flye, Robert Braxton, Jr Raleigh, N. C. 

Flynn, Richard Michael Castro Valley, Calif. 

Forbes, James Tuck Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Francisco, Edward Allen Jacksonville, Fla. 

Frantz, Paul Thomasson Silver Spring, Md. 

Fray, Jackson Lee, III Culpeper, Va. 

Freels, Archibald James, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. 

Frieman, Robert Lawrence Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gaines, John Richard Lakeland, Fla. 

Gardner, Edwin Sumner, Jr Nashville, Tenn. 

(Vanderbilt University) 

Garren, Donald Lee Brevard, N. C. 

Gibson, Ben Wright, III Sewanee, Tenn. 

Gibson, Herbert Cummins West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Gilbert, Lon Bascomb, III Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Gilchrist, Michael Lane Columbia, Tenn. 

Gipson, James Elywin Sewanee, Tenn. 



l80 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Given, William Morris, III Birmingham, Ala. 

Goeltz, Donald Robert Knoxville, Tenn. 

Gomto, George Deanes Wilmington, N. C. 

(Wilmington College) 

Graham, Samuel Russell Justin, Tex. 

Grant, Edward Phillip Louisville, Ky. 

(University of Kentucky) 

Green, Frank Armstrong Jacksonville, Fla. 

Greene, Bruce McGehee Auburn, Ala. 

Greenland, Robert Tupper Alexandria, Va. 

Grove, John Pendleton, III Roanoke, Va. 

Gummey, Frank Bird, III Gladwyne, Pa. 

Gwinn, James William, Jr Darien, Conn. 

Harper, William Bruce, Jr Beaufort, S. C. 

Harris, Frank Scott Nashville, Tenn. 

Harris, William Henry, III Smithfield, N. C. 

Haslbauer, Otto Frank, Jr Norris, Tenn. 

Hay, John Williams Frankfort, Ky. 

Hay, William Pierce, III Farmville, Fa. 

Hayden, Donald Sidney Greenville, Miss. 

Hayes, Cody Lillard Marianna, Ark. 

(Georgia Institute of Technology) 

Haynie, Warren Graham Demopolis, Ala. 

Herring, Robert Freeman, III Newnan, Ga. 

*Hill, James Robert Louisville, Ky. 

(Re-entering from Bellarmine College) 

Hisey, John Mayberry Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Holland, John Roderick Birmingham, Ala. 

(Marion Institute) 

Hunziker, John Emil Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Hurst, Robert Joseph Harlingen, Tex. 

(Re-entering from Del Mar College) 

Hynson, Robert Gardiner Laurel, Miss. 

Iverson, Neal Jerome Mobile, Ala. 

Jardine, Clyde Lawton, Jr Keokuk, Iowa 

Johnson, William Taber Yorkville, III. 

Jones, Richard Rodgers Tampa, Fla. 

Jones, Robert Pepin Charlottesville, Fa. 

Jones, William Bruce Springfield, Tenn. 

Kettelhack, Robert Alan Amityville, N. Y. 

Key, Rutherford Lyle, Jr Birmingham, Ala. 

(Auburn University) 

Kicklighter, Joseph Allen Hawkinsville, Ga. 

King, John Smith, III Memphis, Tenn. 

Kneedler, Paul Wayne Natchez, Miss. 

Kratz, Frederick William, III Kansas City, Mo. 

Lambeth, William Arnold, III Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Laskey, John Jochim Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Lawhon, Thomas James Houston, Tex. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS iSl 

Lee, Scott Jackson Atlanta, Ga. 

:.eRoux, Grant Meade, Jr Atlanta, Ga. 

:>Dftis, John Edgar, III Brevard, N. C. 

jott, James Craft New Orleans, La. 

Love, Robert Calhoun Huntsville, Ala. 

Lyles, James Morris, III Winnsboro, S. C. 

L.yon-VaIden, William Shelton West River, Md. 

^cCammon, George William Goulds, Fla. 

VlcClanahan, Frank Chalmers, III Neligh, Neb. 

VIcCord, Michael Owensby Springfield, Fa. 

(George Mason College) 

V4cKeachie, William Noble Carversville, Pa. 

(St. John's College) 

^cKee, Randolph Lowe Augusta, Ga. 

VlcLean, Leslie Hobert Jacksonville Beach, Fla. 

Vlaggard, Elmer Clarence Hazard, Ky. 

^ann, David Royall Mobile, Ala. 

Martin, Kenneth Lee Dallas, Tex. 

Vlarynick, Samuel Philip Dallas, Tex. 

Vlast, Adlai Travis, III Nacogdoches, Tex. 

Vlazyck, Earle Farley Dothan, Ala. 

Vleyer, James Charles Lexington, Ky. 

Vlilling, David Pipes Chapman, Ala. 

VTilnor, William Henry, Jr Vienna, Va. 

Vlitchell, John Harris, Jr Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

VTonaghan, Thomas Hampton Columbus, Ohio 

(Re-entering from Capital University) 

VIoody, Charles Alan Libertyville, III. 

VToon, Travis Waterbury Charlotte, N. C. 

Vlorgenthaler, Robert Eric, Jr Shawnee Mission, Kan. 

Vlorrison, Langdon Gates Cincinnati, Ohio 

Vloss, Samuel Guy, III Rome, Ga. 

Vlurray, George Bliss Port Arthur, Tex. 

!^eblett, Wallace Ware, III Greenville, Miss. 

Melson, Harry Everette Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

(Middle Tennessee State College) 

Melson, William, III Nashville, Tenn. 

New, Jon Ramon Lafayette, La. 

(University of Southwestern Louisiana) 

Noyes, Harry Floyd, III Mobile, Ala. 

Oberdorfer, Richard Wallace Jacksonville, Fla. 

Oleson, Peter Christian Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Orr, George Edward Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Ostner, James Lee Memphis, Tenn. 

(Lambuth College) 

Otey, Walter Madison, III Talladega, Ala. 

Parrish, Dorman Cheatham Nashville, Tenn. 

Paschall, David Hal McKenzie, Tenn. 

Pate, Alex Wilbum Birmingham, Ala. 

Pauls, Everett Cortes, Jr Dickinson, Tex. 



12 



1 82 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Payne, Terry Daniel Avondale Estates, Ga. 

Peters, Robert Lynn, III Kings-port, Tenn. 

Phelps, Gary Raymond Manchester, Conn. 

Powell, Benjamin Philip Union Springs, Ala. 

Price, Thomas Hosmer Meridian, Miss. 

Rainwater, Crawford Veazey, Jr Pensacola, Fla. 

Reed, John David, III Nashville, Tenn. 

Reynolds, Stephen Hammond Tampa, Fla. 

Richardson, Jon Alan Athens, Tenn. 

Rodarmor, Bruce Cleveland Nezv York, N. Y. 

(Lycee Francais De New York) 

Roggeveen, Adriaan Nicholas Cohasset, Mass. 

*Rose, Alan London, England 

(Middle Tennessee State College) 

Rountree, Jack Wayne Del Rio, Tex. 

Rowe, Rickey Cowan, Tenn. 

(Tennessee A. & I. State University) 

Sajnani, Arjun Lalchand New Delhi, India 

Salter, Paul Broward, Jr Jesup, Ga. 

Saussy, William RadclifFe Tampa, Fla. 

(Re-entering) 

Scarborough, Thomas Dillon Nashville, Tenn. 

Scheu, William Edward, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. 

Senette, Douglas John, Jr Franklin, La. 

Shannon, Donald Lloyd, III Atlanta, Ga. 

Sheller, James Robert Lafayette, La. 

Shepherd, James Everett Bartow, Fla. 

Shepherd, William Smythe, Jr Beaumont, Tex. 

(Lamar State College of Technology) 

Sheppard, William Wilson, Jr Louisiana, Mo. 

Shutze, Virgil Cox, Jr Atlanta, Ga. 

Sloat, John Gregory, II Slidell, La. 

Smith, Clarence McFerrin, Jr DeLand, Fla. 

Smith, David Edward Chico, Calif. 

(Chico State College) 

Smith, Joel Algernon, III Columbia, S. C. 

Snowden, Charles Durkee, Jr Langhorne, Pa. 

•Soskis, Joque Hall Odessa, Fla. 

(Re-entering from military service) 

Spruill, Walker Duvall Cheraw, S. C. 

Stacpoole, Peter Wallace Mill Valley, Calif. 

Stallworth, James Manly, Jr Charleston, S. C. 

Stanfill, Craig Mac El Paso, Tex. 

Steele, William Harding, Jr Louisville, Ky. 

Steeves, James Alston Birmingham, Ala. 

Stevenson, Robert Fenton Baltimore, Md. 

Stirling, James Douglas Columbia, S. C. 

Stockell, Albert Wright, III Nashville, Tenn. 

Stokes, Henry Arthur Jacksonville Beach, Fla. 

Stone, Michael Lawrence Kingsport, Tenn. 



I 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1 83 

*Story, Benjamin Sprague, III Jeffersonville, Ind. 

(Re-entering from Indiana University) 

*Strohl, Timothy David Indianapolis, Ind. 

(Re-entering from Purdue University) 

Sturtevant, Joseph Eldward, Jr Columbia, S. C. 

Summers, Byron Daniel Justin, Tex. 

Sumpter, William David, III Nashville, Tenn. 

Swift, Garfield Christian, Jr Washington, D. C. 

Taylor, John Champneys, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. 

Terrill, Charles Madison Sewanee, Tenn. 

Terry, Richard Bruce Cookeville, Tenn. 

Thomas, Lee Muller Ridgeway, S. C. 

(Clemson Agricultural College) 

Thompson, John Lewis, III Houston, Tex. 

Thornton, William Holladay, Jr Wrightsville Beach, N. C. 

Tucker, Beverley Randolph, III Richmond, Va. 

Tucker, William Hamer Athens, Ga. 

Tugwell, William Dudley, III Soddy, Tenn. 

Uden, James LeSueur Nashville, Tenn. 

Urquhart, Douglas Russell Dallas, Tex. 

*Vehnekamp, William Ray Pine Bluffs, Wyo. 

(Re-entering) 

Vollrath, Thomas Lachlan Kansas City, Mo. 

Walker, Allen Russell, Jr Salem, Va. 

Walter, Peter Rucker Longmeadow, Mass. 

Ward, Thomas Reid, Jr Meridian, Miss. 

Watkins, John Franklin, IV Prattville, Ma. 

Watkms, Miles Abemathy, III Birmingham, Ala. 

Webb, Joseph Cheshire Sewanee, Tenn. 

Webb, Roderick Cameron, Jr Jackson, Tenn. 

Welch, Aaron Waddington, Jr Raleigh, N. C. 

Welch, Robert Ellis, Jr Charleston, S. C. 

Wells, John Gay, Jr Newnan, Ga. 

Wells, Warner McNeill, III Greenwood, Miss. 

Wharton, George Christopher West Hartford, Conn. 

White, John Richardson Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Wilheit, Philip Arthur Gainesville, Ga. 

Wmfield, Peter Martin Chatham, N. Y. 

*Work, Dan Taylor, Jr Memphis, Tenn. 

(Georgia Institute of Technology) 

Yang, Christopher Ta-Yung Berea, Ky. 

*Second Semester 



184 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

FRESHMEN WITH PREVIOUS COLLEGE EXPERIENCE 
Less than 24 sem. hrs. and/or 18 qual. credits) 

*Amsworth, John Merrill Houston, Tex. 

(University of Virginia) 

Cornelius, Maxwell Joseph Seivanee, Tenn. 

(Carleton College) 

Cunningham, Lawrence Thomas Louisville, Ky. 

DeSaix, Peter Asheville, N. C. 

Dudley, Marion Lee .... Dade City, Fla. 

(Re-entering) 

*Edwards, John Calvin Oakville, Conn. 

(Re-entering) 

Fisher, Thomas Wade Hampton Raleigh, N. C. 

Goodwm, William Mark, III Catonsville, Md. 

Heck, Samuel Leroy Chestertown, Md. 

(Washington College) 

Hehmeyer, Philip Leland Memphis, Tenn. 

(Re-entering) 

*Hinnant, Janies Bryant, III Jacksonville, Fla. 

(Re-entering) 

Knott, Richard Morrell St. Andrew's, Tenn. 

Langley, Hiram Glazier, III Chattanooga, Tenn. 

*Lyle, John Henry Winchester, Tenn. 

(Talladega College) 

Mcllhenny, Paul Carr New Orleans, La. 

(Tulane University) 

May, John Donald Alexandria, Fa. 

Northup, Thomas Melton Santa Fe, N. M. 

Olmsted, Frederick Erskine Rockville, Md. 

Owen, Blanton Hall Sewanee, Tenn. 

Parker, Edward Frost, Jr Charleston, S. C. 

Pegues, William Claudius La Marque, Tex. 

(Re-entering) 

*Perrin, Henry Keats Helena, Ark. 

(University of Mississippi) 

Polk, Albert Sidney, III Baltimore, Md. 

*Price, Stephen Rudolph Dublin, Ga. 

(Trevecca Nazarene College) 

Reed, Gilpin Lyman New Orleans, La. 

*Rogers, Gregory William Jacksonville, Fla. 

(Re-entering) 

Rutledge, Wesley Norris Pensacola, Fla. 

*Schutz, Eric Alfred Orlando, Fla. 

(Georgia Institute of Technology) 

*Smith, Gordon Emerson Nashville, Tenn. 

(University of South Carolina) 

Steenerson, Edward Lewis North Augusta, S. C. 

(Re-entering) 

*Stevens, Lawrence Sterne, II Atlanta, Ga. 

(Re-entering) 

Sundby, Stephen James Jacksonville, Fla. 

Sutton, James Andrew Madison, N. J. 

Templeton, Handly Cotton . . Winchester, Tenn. 

(Re-€ntering after military service) 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1 85 

Traver, Warren Lee Atlanta, Ga. 

Veal, David Barco Atlantic Beach, Fla. 

Walker, Jeffrey Hartwell Houston, Tex. 

(University of Houston) 

Wood, Denny Erwin Sewanee, Tenn. 

(Washington University) 

*Wood, Percy Hoxle, III Princeton, N. /. 

(Re-entering) 



*Second Semester 



FRESHMEN WITH NO PREVIOUS COLLEGE EXPERIENCE 

Archer, Clyde William Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Armstrong, William Mark Scottsboro, Ala. 

Arnold, Christopher Vance Roswell, Ga. 

Avdoyan, Levon, Jr Orlando, Fla. 

Bailey, Robert Lee Staten Island, N. Y. 

Ball, John Willis, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. 

Barron, George Albert, III Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Baxter, Glenn Nelson Eufaula, Ala. 

Bell, Thomas Aiken Birmingham, Ala. 

Bennett, Winfield Scott, Jr Augusta, Ga. 

Bethea, Henry Lawrence Baytozvn, Tex. 

Blakeslee, Merritt Ripley Evergreen, Colo. 

Bledsoe, Craig Vanderbilt Atlanta, Ga. 

Boardman, Thomas Armistead Clinton-Sherman AFB, Okla. 

Bobbitt, Robert Lee, III San Antonio, Tex. 

Boulet, Francis Stephen Deschaumes Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

Bourgeau, Arthur Leo, III Estill Springs, Tenn. 

Bruner, Jeffrey Sayre Albany, N. Y. 

Bryan, John Porcher, Jr Charleston, S. C. 

Bryson, John Wayne, Jr Athens, Tenn. 

Buntin, John Craighead Nashville, Tenn. 

Burroughs, James Edgerton Conway, S. C. 

Burrows, Stanyame, III Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Bush, David Wynne Memphis, Tenn. 

Buttrey, David Roscoe, Jr Nashville, Tenn. 

Byrd, Robert Wilson Hudson Staten Island, N. Y. 

Cabell, John Norton Waccabuc, N. Y. 

Cathrae, William Davies Sarasota, Fla. 

Caverly, Douglas Gardner Cos Cob, Conn. 

Cawthon, William Stanmore Tallahassee, Fla. 

Chitty, Arthur Benjamin, III Seivanee, Tenn. 

Ciannella, Domenic Kennith Hicksville, N. Y. 

Colby, John WUson, Jr Spokane, Wash. 

Coleman, William Chlsolm, Jr Sarasota, Fla. 

Colley, William Tyler Fort Worth, Tex. 



lob THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Comer, John Fletcher, Jr Birmingham, Ma. 

Conder, John Alves San Diego, Calif. 

Conner, Edwin Lee Eufaula, Ala. 

Coughlin, Barring, Jr Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Crowe, Wiilliam Clarke, Jr Anniston, Ala. 

Crutchfield, Paul Bradshaw, Jr Morganton, N. C. 

Cuthrell, Vernon Camp, III Beaumont, Tex. 

Dane, Joseph Redhead Atlanta, Ga. 

Davis, Alan Blake Birmingham, Ala. 

Deal, Carolis Uriah Toccoa, Ga. 

Dearing, Peter Lennings Neptune Beach, Fla. 

Dellmeier, Werner Tullahoma, Tenn. 

DeWolfe, James Pernette, III Fort Worth, Tex. 

Dize, Jesse Henderson Kilmarnock, Fa. 

Duffy, Thomas Rowland Bonne Terre, Mo. 

Dyer, David Patterson, Jr Waynesville, N. C. 

Eatman, George Hackney Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Edwards, William Scott Jacksonville, Fla. 

Elam, Roy Oscar, III Nashville, Tenn. 

Elmore, Frederick Alexander, III Louisville, Tenn. 

Ennis, William Robert, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. 

Eoff, Jeffrey Morrow Oscoda, Mich. 

Evans, George Kimmons, Jr. Charlotte, N. C. 

Ezzell, James Battle Nashville, Tenn. 

Feaster, Scott Vandiver Jensen Beach, Fla. 

Fleming, William Stuart, V Columbia, Tenn. 

Fletcher, Jonathan Sturtevant Aiken, S. C. 

Forster, Frederick Harwood Knoxville, Tenn. 

Frazier, French Benham, Jr Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

Friedel, John Ashby Birmingham, Ala. 

Gallager, Richard Lee Houston, Tex. 

Gardiner, Frederick Sleigh ... Sewanee, Tenn. 

Gignilliat, Charles Olmstead Gainesville, Ga. 

Gildersleeve, John Nelson Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Gooding, John Bernard, Jr Savannah, Ga. 

Goodman, William Larry Sewanee, Tenn. 

Gregg, Alan Townley St. Michaels, Md. 

Gribbin, Robert Emmet, III Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Grimball, William Heyward Charleston, S. C. 

Grubb, John Grennan, Jr Westjield, N. J. 

Guess, Joseph Thomas Sherwood, Tenn. 

Hagler, James Robert Lenoir City, Tenn. 

Hanbury, Burton Blanton, Jr Farmville, Fa. 

Harrison, William David Birmingham, Ala. 

Hart, George Chllds, Jr Columbia, S. C. 

Harwell, William Beasley, Jr Nashville, Tenn. 

Hastie, Carlisle Norwood, III Charleston, S. C. 



I 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1 87 

Hawkins, Eugene Cyril, Jr Montgomery, Ala. 

Head, Douglas Arthur Atlanta, Ga. 

Heck, Edward Victor Danville, Ky. 

Henley, John Allen Cowan, Tenn. 

Henry, Robert Evelyn Greenville, S. C. 

Hickman, Ralph Jack Midland, Tex. 

Higdon, Thomas Allen Huntsville, Ala. 

*Hillin, Harvey Henderson, Jr Houston, Tex. 

Hobbs, Walter Newman, Jr Charlotte, N. C. 

Hoch, Paul Frederick, Jr Raleigh, N. C. 

Hogg, Lynn Glovier Woodstock, Fa. 

HoUoway, Robert Ashton, Jr Baton Rouge, La. 

Hopkins, George William, H Winchester, Tenn. 

Hughes, Yancey Vernon, Jr , Decatur, Ala. 

Hunt, William Thurman Crawford Houston, Tex. 

Ikard, William Forsyth Chevy Chase, Md. 

Irani, Terence Shethar Hydes, Md. 

Ison, Todd Mansfield Escondido, Calif. 

Jahncke, Robert Cutting Metairie, La. 

Jefcoat, Michael Roy Laurel, Miss. 

Johnson, Malcolm Collins, HI Tillar, Ark. 

Jones, Marion Nelson Osceola, Ark. 

Kammski, Nathan, Jr Georgetown, S. C. 

Keith, Julian Parke Selma, Ala. 

King, Brian Bom Charleston, S. C. 

Kinsey, James Walter Dover, N. J. 

Kirk, Robert Ernest Jasper, Tenn. 

Kirven, Edward Preuit Linden, Ala. 

Knickelbine, Michael Radford Gulf Breeze, Fla. 

Kuehnle, Robert Joseph Natchez, Miss. 

Lambeth, Carter Tate Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Landrum, John Samuel Beaumont, Tex. 

Lang, William AUyn, HI Corsicana, Tex. 

Leake, Nolan Crenshaw Jasper, Ala. 

Leland, Richard Deas Levesinat, France 

LeRoy, Joseph Beene Thomson, Ga. 

Lightcap, Tracy Lee Ramsay Atlanta, Ga. 

Lihme, William Anthony New York, N. Y. 

Lincobi, Ivy Glen Little Rock, Ark. 

Lull, David Carner Moylan, Pa. 

McDonald, James Michael Baton Rouge, La. 

McDonough, John Martin, Jr Phoenix, Md. 

McKenzie, William Paul Chattanooga, Tenn. 

McMurrey, Robert Millard Kilgore, Tex. 

McRae, Roy Parker, Jr Peabody, Mass. 

Maddox, Michael Lane Baton Rouge, La. 

Mansfield, Vola Wesley, III Chattanooga, Tenn. 



[bb THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Martm, Harold Odest, III Milwaukee, Wise. 

Martin, William Kelley Pike Road, Ala. 

Marye, Robert Franklin Signal Mountain, Tenn. 

Merchant, John Edward Charles Town, W. Fa. 

Miller, Robert MacFarlane Southampton, N. Y. 

Milnor, John Pervis, III Memphis, Tenn. 

Milward, Hendree Brinton, Jr Lexington, Ky. 

Moran, Marsden Leverich New Orleans, La. 

Morgan, Ralph Speer Fort Smith, Ark. 

Muldoon, Robert William, Jr Ruxton, Md. 

Murchison, Frank Bivin Corsicana, Tex. 

Murphy, Gary Lynn Ft. Walton Beach, Fla. 

Myrick, Conrad Bonifay Dallas, Tex. 

Napier, Billy Betterton Loring AFB, Maine 

Neely, Leroy Gardner Atlanta, Ga. 

Newton, Harold Scott Charleston, S. C. 

Nies, John Tilden St. Louis, Mo. 

Northup, Frederick Bowen North Andover, Mass. 

Norton, David Charles Franklin, Ind. 

Oakes, Herbert Lee, Jr Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

CyKelley, Charles Rogers, Jr Athens, Ga. 

Oliver, Chadwick Dearing Camden, S. C. 

Olofson, John Erik West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Overstreet, James Wilkins, III Savannah Beach, Ga. 

Patterson, Robert Gregory Ballwin, Mo. 

Penner, Henry Andrews Fort Worth, Tex. 

Picton, John Lowell Cincinnati, Ohio 

Pierce, Richard Wilcox Cartersville, Ga. 

Pope, Thomas Harrington, III Newberry, S. C. 

Powell, Ralph Edwin, Jr Indiatlantic, Fla. 

Prentiss, Paul Trapier Keith, Jr Nashville, Tenn. 

Rahlfs, John William, Jr Midland, Tex. 

Randle, Daniel Wilson Winnetka, III. 

Remick, David Jennings Houston, Tex. 

Rima, William Henry, III Golden, Col. 

Roberts, Stephen Norvell Baldwinsville, N. Y. 

Robinson, Allen Jones Boykin Columbia, S. C. 

Robinson, Floyd Irvin, Jr Virginia Beach, Fa. 

Rogers, James Amonell, Jr Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

Rossbach, Christopher Howard West Somerset, Ky. 

Rue, Thomas Sidney Andalusia, Ala. 

Runnels, Harry Lewis Crystal River, Fla. 

Russ, Guston Price, III Adobile, Ala. 

Sadler, Henry Philip, Jr Richmond, Fa. 

Salley, Philip Jackson Orangeburg, S. C. 

Sanders, David Lawrence Columbus, Miss. 

Schaefer, Milton Pledger, Jr Memphis, Tenn. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1 89 

Schenck, Stephen Ernest Sommervllle Westminster, Mass. 

Scheppe, Payton Eugene, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. 

Scherzer, Charles Otto, II Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Sifly, Raymond William, Jr Orangeburg, S. C. 

SImms, William Arthur Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Skinner, Eric Herbert Long Valley, N. J. 

Smith, Craig Robert Orchard Park, N. Y. 

Smith, Thomas Heiden Winchester, Tenn. 

Smythe, Frederick Joseph Tribbett, Miss. 

Speck, George William Menard, Tex. 

Starr, Bryan Lawrence Atlanta, Ga. 

Stecker, Frederick, IV Columbus, Ohio 

Stockton, Robert Field, IV Mendham, N. J. 

Stovall, Thomas Bates Winchester, Tenn. 

Strong, James Blades Charlotte, N. C. 

Stuckey, Walter Craig Greenwood, S. C. 

Sublett, Thomas Allen Decherd, Tenn. 

Taylor, John Charles Randolph, III Norfolk, Va. 

Teschke, John Norrgard Delray Beach, Fla. 

Thompson, Larry Joe Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Tindal, William Conner Lancaster, S. C. 

Torrance, Bruce Roger Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Trask, Harold Eugene, Jr Beaufort, S. C. 

Treadwell, George Harry Memphis, Tenn. 

Tunnell, William Newton, Jr Andalusia, Ala. 

Turner, John Lovick, IV Thomasville, Ga. 

Turpit, John Burroughs Whittier, Calif. 

Usry, Michael Dawson Albany, Ga. 

Walker, Benjamin Pressley, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. 

Walker, Ronald Mitchell Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Wamiey, Stephen Thaddeus South Jamesport, N. Y. 

Wasson, John Chapman, Jr Dover, Del. 

Weekley, Richard Douglas Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Weller, George Arnold, Jr Beaumont, Tex. 

Whitehead, James Walter, Jr Lexington, Fa. 

Whiteside, Heustis Pennington, Jr Burga-w, N. C. 

Wland, Burton Webb Summit, N. J. 

Wittlrff, James Ruston Lufkin, Tex. 

Woolman, Lee James Little Rock, Ark. 

Wright, Donald Evans Huntsville, Ala. 

Wulf, Robert Forrest Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Wyatt, Robert Odell, II Huntingdon, Tenn. 

Zimmermann, David Allyn Bellaire, Tex. 

Zseltvay, Robert Richard, Jr - - Franklin, Tenn. 



*Second Semester 



190 



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOLTTH 



IRREGULAR CLASSIFICATION 

Cameron, Douglas Wmston (Transient Student) Sewanee, Tenn. 

(Part-time) 

Goodman, Ellis Leon (Special Student) Winchester, Tenn. 

(Full-time) 

Silvertooth, Ernest Wayne (Special Student) Winchester, Tenn. 

(Part-time) 

Strange, Edwin Bruton, IV (Special Student) Greenville, Del, 

(Full-time) 



SUMMARY 



Seniors 146 

Juniors 152 

Sophomores 238 

Freshmen with previous college work 28 

Freshmen with no previous college work 219 

Irregular classification 4 



ENTERED 
2ND SEM. 

2 

3 

9 

II 

I 



787 



26 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE 
FIRST SEMESTER 1964-65 



Alabama 74 

Arkansas 10 

California 10 

Connecticut 6 

Delaware 3 

District of Columbia . 4 

Florida 92 

Georgia 59 

Illinois 8 

Indiana 2 

Iowa I 

Kansas 7 

Kentucky 16 

Louisiana 21 

Maine 2 

Maryland 17 

Massachusetts lO 

Michigan i 

Minnesota i 

Mississippi 19 

Missouri II 

Nebraska I 



ENTERED 
2ND SEM. 



New Jersey 7 

New Mexico 2 

New York 15 

North Carolina 35 

Ohio 14 

Oklahoma 7 

Pennsylvania 11 

South Carolina 58 

South Dakota i 

Tennessee 157 

Texas 61 

Virginia 31 

Washington 3 

West Virginia 3 

Wisconsin 2 

Wyoming 

England 

India I 

Philippines I 

Puerto Rico 2 

Switzerland I 

787 



ENTERED 
2ND SEM. 



26 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 191 

RELIGIOUS DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE 
FIRST SEMESTER 1964-65 

ENTERED ENTERED 

2ND SEM. 2ND SEM. 

Baptist 34 2 Jewish I 

Christian 4 Lutheran 6 

Church of Christ 10 Methodist 91 4 

Church of Christ, Mormon i 

Scientist I Nazarene i 

Church of God 2 Presbyterian 67 3 

Congregational 5 Protestant 4 

Disciples of Christ . . 3 Roman Catholic 17 

Episcopal 513 15 No Affiliation Listed . 26 i 

Greek Orthodox .... i — 

Hindu I 787 26 



192 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY, SUMMER 1964 

The Rev. Jacob Lawrence Andrews, B.D Milford, Mich. 

The Rev. William Thomas Ashby, S.Th London, Ont. 

The Rev. Henry Philip Auffrey, S.T.B Muscatine, Iowa 

The Rev. Leon Crawford Balch, B.D Chattanooga, Tenn. 

The Rev. John Clib Barton, Jr., B.D Russdlville, Ark. 

The Rev. Thomas Dix Bowers, B.D Washington, D. C. 

The Rev. Chester Dwight Fowler Boynton, S.T.B Dundee, III. 

The Rev. Charles Homer Brown, BX) Houston, Tex. 

The Rev. Charles Francis Caldwell, B.D Tampa, Fla. 

The Rev. George Harold Cave, Jr., S.T.M Marathon, Fla. 

The Rev. Robert Marsh Cooper, S.T.B Baton Rouge, La. 

The Rev. Charles Raymond Cotton Daugherty, H, S.T.B Leonardtown, Md. 

*Mrs. Rachel Elizabeth Brown deRosset, M.A Frederick, Md. 

The Rev. John William Drake, Jr., B.D GreenviUe, N. C. 

The Rev. Alfred Lee Durrance, BD Maitland, Fla. 

The Rev. Henry Thomas Foley, B.D Jackson, Mo. 

Miss Ethel Ruth Gandy, M.A Edwards, Miss. 

The Rev. Charles Chesnut Green, B.D Chattanooga, Tenn. 

*The Rev. William James Hadden, Jr Greenville, N. C. 

The Rev. Rogers Sanders Harris, B.D Greer, S. C. 

The Rev. Charles Leonard Henry, B.A Eufaula, Ala. 

The Rev. Bertram Nelson Herlong, B.D Jacksonville, Fla. 

The Rev. Charles Bagnell Hoglan, Jr., B.D Forrest City, Ark. 

The Rev. Robert Ernest Holzhammer, B.D Iowa City, Iowa 

The Rev. James Conroy Jackson, B.Th Denmark, S. C. 

The Rev. John Lewis Jenkins, Jr., BD Cochran, Ga. 

The Rev. Ryder Channing Johnson, S.T.B Geneva, N. Y. 

Mr. William Cherry Livingston Sewanee, Tenn. 

The Rev, Henry Irving Louttit, Jr., B.D Statesboro, Ga. 

The Rev. William Alexander MacAulay, B.Th Waterford, Ont. 

The Rev. Frank Burnett Mangum, B.D Waco, Tex. 

The Rev. McAlister Crutchiield Marshall, B.D Ashland, Fa. 

The Rev. David Raymond Mason, S.T.B South Charleston, W. Fa. 

The Rev. Henry Edward Maurer, B.D Kirksville, Mo. 

The Rev. William McClelland, Jr., B.D Roswell, Ga. 

The Rev. Robert Samuel McGinnis, Jr., B.D Augusta, Ga. 

The Rev. John McKee, HI, S.T.M New Orleans, La. 

The Rev. Henry Nichols Faulconer Minich, B.D West Hollywood, Fla. 

The Rev. John James Ormond, B.D Petersburg, Fa. 

The Rev. John Clifton Parker, Jr., B.D Bessemer, Ala. 

The Rev. Kenneth Wayne Paul, B.D Alexandria, La. 

The Rev. Roy Ester Perry, B.D Huntland, Tenn. 

The Rev. William Stuart Pregnall, B.D Charleston, W. Fa. 

The Rev. Paul Waddell Pritchartt, B.D Spartanburg, S. C. 



I 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 193 

The Rev. James Giles Radebaugh, B.D Palm Bay, Fla. 

The Rev. James Farr Reed, B.D DeRidder, La. 

The Rev. Frank Wall Robert, B.D Sewanee, Tenn. 

The Rev. Gordon Page Roberts, S.T.B Clinton, Iowa 

The Rev. Lawrence Hadley Rouillard, B.D Claremont, Calif. 

The Rev. Max Ignacio Salvador, B.D Miami, Fla. 

The Rev. James Frederick Satterlee Schniepp, B.D Hinsdale, III. 

*The Rev. George Leonard Shultz Tahlequah, Okla. 

The Rev. Benjamin Bosworth Smith, B.A., Cert. Th Birmingham, Ala. 

The Rev. Elton Osman Smith, Jr., S.T.B Leawood, Kan. 

The Rev. Herbert H^gh Smith, Jr., B.D Norfolk, Fa. 

The Rev. George Hartmann Sparks, Jr., B.D Fountain Inn, S. C. 

Mr. David Irvmg Suellau Sewanee, Tenn. 

The Rev. Derwent Albert Suthers, B.D WilUamston, Mich. 

The Rev. Robert Dawbam Terhune, Jr., S.T.B Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. 

The Rev. Martin Robert Tilson, B.D Charlotte, N. C. 

The Rev. Kenneth Robert Treat, S.T.B Jacksonville, Fla. 

The Rev. Edwin Gould Wappler, B.D Des Plaines, III. 

*Mr. Matthews Weller Sewanee, Tenn. 

The Rev. Hoyt Winslett, Jr., S.T.B Guntersville , Ala. 

♦Auditor 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1964-65 
SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 

SENIORS 

Abstein, William Robert, II, B.A., (Fla. St. U.), Fla Jacksonville, Fla. 

Barney, David Marshall, B.A., (U. of Va.), S. C Towson, Md. 

Borom, James Robinson, A.B., (Oglethorpe U.), Atl Chamblee, Ga. 

Burchell, Robert Latimer, B.Chm.En., (Cornell U.), Ky Paducah, Ky. 

Harmon, Robert Dale, B..A., (Lenoir-Rhyne Coll.), W. N. C. .. Bessemer City, N. C. 

James, William Evans, BA., (Ga. St. Coll.), Atl Avondale Estates, Ga. 

Jones, Sidney Ross, B.A., (Tulane), Miss Woodville, Miss. 

Kehayes, Thomas Carl, B.A., (U. of N. C), ^. C Edenton, N. C. 

Landers, Edward Leslie, Jr., B.A., (La. Coll.), La Alexandria, La. 

Livingston, William Cherry, (Presby. Coll.), U. S. C Cleveland, S. C. 

Marsh, Ralph Olin, A.B., (Emory U.), Atl Ft. Myers, Fla. 

Massey, Hoyt B., B.S., (Fla. St. V.), S. Fla Melbourne Beach, Fla. 

Pipes, Louie Noland, Jr., B.A., (Va. Mil. Inst.), La Rayville, La. 

Skilton, William Jones, B.S., (Citadel), S. C Winter Park, Fla. 

Stubbs, Thomas MtAlpm, Jr., A.B., (Harvard); LL.B., (U. of Ga.), Atl. Atlanta, Ga. 

Suellau, David Irving, (St. Petersburg Jun. Coll.), S. Fla St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Weller, Matthews, (Citadel) , Fla Jacksonville, Fla. 

Wilson, Barclay DeVane, B.S., (Fla. S>t.\J.), Fla Tallahassee, Fla. 



194 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 



MIDDLERS 



Abbott, Richard Taylor, B.S., (Howard Coll.), Jla Mobile, Ala. 

Boss, Michael Cleare, B.A., (U. of So.), Fla Jacksonville, Fla. 

Caradine, Bill Charles, A.B., (Birmingham-Southern), Ala Fairfield, Ala. 

Cooper, Richard Randolph, B.A., (U. of So.), 5. Fla Winter Park, Fla. 

Elwood, Richard Hugh, B.A., (Baylor U.), Tgx Waco, Tex. 

Flynn, John Maurice, (Jones Bus. Coll.), Fla Jacksonville, Fla. 

Flynn, Michael Thomas, B.A., (U. of Calif.), Los Ang Burbank, Calif. 

Glover, Samuel Graham, LL.B., (U. of Ga.), Ala Mentone, Ala. 

Graner, James Frederick, B.A., (U. of Kansas City), Ala Birmingham, Ala. 

Hess, Cameron Mason, B.S., (Va. Poly. Inst.); M.S., (Richmond Prof. Inst.), 

Fla Christiansburg, Va. 

Jones, Cecil Baron, Jr., B.A., (U. of Miss.), Miss Columbus, Miss. 

Krumbach, Arthur William, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., (Mich. State U.), 

Ark Harrison, Ark. 

Law, James William, B.A., (Trinity Coll., Hartford), L. Island Haworth, N. J. 

Luckett, Robert Leven, B.A., (La. Coll.), La Alexandria, La. 

'Marble, Alfred Clark, Jr., B.A., (U. of Miss.), Miss Vicksburg, Miss. 

Mathleson, James West, B.A., (Lynchburg Coll.), S. Va Hampton, Va. 

McGinnis, John Milton, B.M., M.M., (Peabody Coll.), Tenn Shdbyville, Ky. 

McMIchael, Ralph Nelson, B.S., (La. Poly. Inst.), La Minden, La. 

Overman, Everett Franklin, B.S., (U. S. Naval Acad.), S. C Charleston, S. C. 

Poppell, William Ashton, B.S., (Fla. State U.), Fla Jacksonville, Fla. 

Poulos, George William, B.S., (U. of Ga.), Atl Rome, Ga. 

Pradat, Ray William, B.S., (U. of Ala.), Miss Meridian, Miss. 

RIsInger, William Harper, Jr., B.S., (So. St. Coll.), Ark El Dorado, Ark. 

Ross, Robert Layne, Jr., B.A., (Howard Coll.), Ala Birmingham, Ala. 

Sharpe, Jack Temple, Jr., B.A., (U. of Tenn.), Tenn Knoxville, Tenn. 

Weal, David Lee, B.A., (U. of Ala.), Ala Fountain City, Tenn. 

Williams, Theodore Martin, B.S., (U. S. Naval Acad.), Ala Atlanta, Ga. 

JUNIORS 

Bainbrldge, Harry Brown, III, B.A., (U. of So.), Tenn Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

Bell, Benjamin Franklin, B.S., (St. Louis U.), Miss Vicksburg, Miss. 

Bennett, Ernest Gene, B.S., (U. of Chatt.), Tenn Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Boynton, William Wordsworth, II, A.B., (San Diego St. Coll.), L. A. . San Diego, Calif. 

Campbell, Martin John, (Kings Coll., U. of London), S. Fla Winter Haven, Fla. 

Clarke, James Alexander, B.BA., (U. of Ga.), Atl Atlanta, Ga. 

Cooke, James Coffield, Jr., A.B., (V. oiN. C), E. C Williamston, N. C. 

Curran, Charles Daniel, Jr., A.B., (Earlham Coll.), S. Fla Washington, D. C. 

Day, Charles Van, III, B.A., B.S., (John B. Stetson U.), S. Fla Miami, Fla. 

Floyd, Charles Kamper, Jr., B.B.A., (U. of Miss.), Miss Meridian, Miss. 

Greenwood, Don Robert, B.A., (U. of Calif., Santa Barbara), Tenn. . Santa Ana, Calif. 

Herlocker, John Robert, B.B.A., (U. of Texas), Ark Greenville, Tex. 

Hill, Franklin ClIfFord, BA., (U. of S. C); M.S., (Fla. St. U.), 

U.S,C Rock Hill, S. C. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS IQ5 

Martin, John Gayle, BA., (Birmingham-Southern), Ala Bessemer, Ala. 

McLean, James Rayford, Jr., B.S., (So. St. Coll.), Ark El Dorado, Ark. 

McLean, John Lee, Jr., BA., (Southwestern at Memphis), Tenn Memphis, Tenn. 

Moody, Thomas Edward, A.B., (U. of Ga.), Atl Atlanta, Ga. 

Muth, David Philip, B.S., (Tulane U.), Calif Metairie, La. 

Preston, James Montgomery, II, B.A., (U. of Houston), W. Tex Houston, Tex. 

Ray, Robert Owen, Jr., B.S., (Millsaps Coll.). Miss Eupora, Miss. 

Renick, Van Taliaferro, B.S., (Okla. A. and M.), Ga Augusta, Ga. 

Ware, Kenneth, B.A., (U. of So.), Tenn Little Rock, Ark. 

Wave, John Erford, B.S., M.S., (Fla. St. V.), Fla Panama City, Fla. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

^Carnp, Thomas Edward, B.A., (Centenary Coll.); M.S. in L.S., 

(La. St. U.) Sezvanee, Tenn. 

*Dunbar, Robert Barron, Rev., A.B., (Davidson Coll.); B.D., (Union Sem., Va.); 

MA., (Presby. Sch., Ch. Ed.), U. S. C Rock Hill, S. C. 

^Fisher, William Bowlyne, Rev., B.S., (Memphis St.); B.D., (U. of So.), 

Tenn Ripley, Tenn. 

Home, George Everette, Jr., Rev., B.A., (Wabash Coll.), Atl Rome, Ga. 

Kethley, John Bryan, B.S., (U. of Ga.), Decatur, Ga. 

*Meney, Brian James, MA., (Glasgow U.); (Theol. Coll.), 

Glasgow and Galloway Paisley, Scot. 

Weeks, Philip Edward, Rev., B.A., (Lynchburg Coll.), S. Fa Lynchburg, Fa- 

^First Semester Only. 

"Entered Second Semester. 

'Exchange Student at Theological College, Edinburg, Scotland, 1964-65. 

*Exchange Student. 



SUMMARY 



Sieniors 18 

Middlers 26 

Juniors 23 

Special 6 

Exchange I 



74 



ENTERED 
2ND SEM. 



196 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

DIOCESAN DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 

FIRST SEMESTER 1964-65 ; 

ENTERED '| 

2ND SEM. j 

Alabama 7 i 

Arkansas 4 

Atlanta 9 i 

California i I 

East Carolina 2 I 

Florida 8 

Georgia i 

Glasgow and Galloway i 1 

Kentucky i ■ 

Long Island i 

Los Angeles 2 -■ 

Louisiana 4 

Mississippi 7 

South Carolma 3 I 

South Florida 6 i 

Southern Virginia 2 : 

Tennessee , 9 | 

Texas i j 

Upper South Carolina 2 j 

West Texas i i 

Western North Carolina i 

Baptist I j 

7* ~i \ 



BOARD OF REGENTS 



Robert G. Snowden, B.S., Chairman, Memphis, Tennessee. 

Rt. Rev. Charles C. J. Carpenter, D.D., Chancellor, Birmingham, 

Alabama. 
Edward McCrady, Ph.D., LL.D., Sc.D., L.H.D., Vice-Chancellor, Se- 

wanee, Tennessee. 
Rt. Rev. George M. Murray, D.D., Birmingham, Alabama. 
Rev. Charles F. Schilling, B.A., B.D., Hollywood, Florida. 
L. Kemper Williams, D.C.L., New Orleans, Louisiana. 
Harvey G. Booth, Atlanta, Georgia. 
Rev. Harold C. Gosnell, D.D., San Antonio, Texas. 
G. Allen Kimball, L.L.B., Lake Charles, Louisiana. 
Rt. Rev. E. Hamilton West, D.D., Jacksonville, Florida. 
Rt. Rev. Robert R. Brown, D.D., Little Rock, Arkansas. 
Rev. E. Dudley Colhoun, Jr., B.A., B.D., Winston-Salem, North 

Carolina. 
R. Eugene Orr, A.B., Jacksonville, Florida. 
Henry O. Weaver, B.S., Houston, Texas. 
Rev. David B. Collins, B.A., B.D., S.T.M., Acting Secretary, Sewanee, 

Tennessee. 



legal title of the university 
"THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH" 



13 



198 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

THE BISHOPS 

Rt. Rev, Charles C. J. Carpenter, D.D., Bishop of Alabama, Chancellor, and Presidoit 

of the Board. 
Rt. Rev. John E. Hlnes, D.D., Presiding Bishop. 
Rt. Rev. Arthur C. Lichtenberger, DX)., Retired Presiding Bishop. 
Rt. Rev. Frank A. Juhan, D.D., Retired Bishop. 
Rt. Rev. Albert S. Thomas, D.D., Retired Bishop. 
Rt. Rev. William Scarlett, D.D., Retired Bishop. 
Rt. Rev. Robert E. Gribbin, DX)., Retired Bishop. 
Rt. Rev. Charles Clingman, D.D., Retired Bishop. 
Rt. Rev. John J. Gravatt, D.D., Retired Bishop. 
Rt. Rev. Duncan M. Gray. D.D., Bishop of Mississippi. 
Rt. Rev. Everett H. Jones, D.D., Bishop of West Texas. 
Rt. Rev. Henry I. Louttit, D.D., Bishop of South Florida. 
Rt. Rev. C. Avery Mason, S.T.D., Bishop of Dallas. 
Rt. Rev. Thomas H. Wright, D.D., Bishop of East Carolina. 
Rt. Rev. William R. Moody, DX)., Bishop of Lexington. 
Rt. Rev. George H. Quarterman, D.D., Bishop of Northwest Texas. 
Rt. Rev. M. George Henry, D.D., Bishop of Western North Carolina. 
Rt. Rev. E. Hamilton West, D.D., Bishop of Florida. 
Rt. Rev. Girault M. Jones, DX)., Bishop of Louisiana. 
Rt. Rev. Randolph R. Qaiborne, D.D., Bishop of Atlanta. 
Rt. Rev. Richard H. Baker, D.D., Bishop of North Carolina. 
Rt. Rev. Iveson B. Noland, D.D., Bishop Coadjutor of Louisiana. 
Rt. Rev. George M. Murray, D.D., Bishop Coadjutor of Alabama. 
Rt. Rev. C. Gresham Marmlon, D.D., Bishop of Kentucky. 
Rt. Rev. Albert R. Stuart, D.D., Bishop of Georgia. 
Rt. Rev, John Vander Horst, D,D., Bishop of Tennessee. 
Rt. Rev. Richard E, Dicus, D.D,, Suffragan Bishop of West Texas. 
Rt. Rev. Frederick P. Goddard, S,T.D,, Suffragan Bishop of Texas, 
Rt. Rev. Robert R. Brown, D,D,, Bishop of Arkansas. 
Rt. Rev, George L. Cadlgan, DX)., Bishop of Missouri. 
Rt. Rev. Thomas A. Eraser. Jr,, D.D,, Bishop Coadjutor of North Carolina. 
Rt. Rev. Gray Temple, D.D., Bishop of South Carolina, 
Rt. Rev. John M. AUin, D.D., Bishop Coadjutor of Mississippi, 
Rt. Rev. James L. Duncan, D.D,, Suffragan Bishop of South Florida. 
Rt. Rev. William L. Hargrave, D.D,, Suffragan Bishop of South Florida. 
Rt. Rev, William E. Sanders, D,D., Bishop Coadjutor of Tennessee. 
Rt. Rev. Theodore H, McCrea, S,T,D., Suffragan Bishop of Dallas. 
Rt. Rev, John A, PInckney, D.D., Bishop of Upper South Carolina. 
Rt. Rev. J. Milton Richardson, D,D,, Bishop of Texas, 
Rt. Rev. Scott Field Bailey, D.D,, Suffragan Bishop of Texas, 

Note: Retired Bishops are Honorary Members of the Board of Trustees. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES I99 

CLERICAL AND LAY TRUSTEES 

Alabama — Rev. John C. Turner, Herbert E. Smith, Nicholas H. Cobbs. 

Arkansas — Rev. J. Rayford McLean, Ralph J. Speer, Jr., George K. Cracraft, Jr. 

Adantar—Rev. P. Roberts Bailey, Daniel A. McKeever, Edwin L Hatch. 

Dallas—Rev. Emmett M. Waits, Peter O'Donnel, Jr., Edward Nash. 

East Carolina— Rqv. Charles I. Penick, Walker Taylor, Jr., William H. Smith. 

Florida— Rev. Robert S. Snell, W. Sperry Lee, A. H. Tebault, Jr. 

Georgia — Rev. A. Nelson Daunt, John H. Sherman, Ogden D. Carlton. 

Kentucky — Rev. J. F. G. Hopper, James R. Rash, Jr., Gouverneur H. Nixon. 

Lexington — Rev. Canon A. Person, Jr., Morgan Soaper, Rexford S. Blazer. 

Louisiana — Rev. Robert C. Witcher, George M. Snellings, Joel L. Fletcher. 

Mississippi — Rev. Charles T. Chambers, Jr., Humphreys McGee, Clarence Day.* 

Missouri — Rev. Harry E. Maurer, William C. Honey, George Dexheimer. 

North Carolina — Rev. Martin R. Tilson, David A. Lockhart, Henry T. Clark, Jr. 

Northwest Texas — ^Rev. William E. West, J. R. Anderson, Joe Earnest. 

South Carolina — Rev. Edward B. Guerry, Preston B. Huntley, Berkeley Grimball. 

South Florida — Rev. James R. Brumby, Robert T. Anderson, Rhonnie Andrew Duncan. 

Tennessee — Rev. William G. Pollard, Troy Beatty, Jr., Alexander Guerry, Jr. 

Texas — Rev. Charles Wyatt-Brown, William M. Bomar, Thomas K. Lamb, Jr. 

Upper South Carolina — Ven. William A. Beckham, W. DuBose Stuckey, Samuel Boykin. 

West Texas— Rev. Thomas H. Morris, William Hollis Fitch, Robert M. Ayers, Jr. 

Western North Carolina — Rev. Robert E. Johnson, S. Blake Mcintosh, Robert L. 

Haden. 
Associated Alumni — John P. Guerry, Richard Morey Hart, John W. Woods, Rt. Rev. 

David S. Rose, Edward B. Crosland, George M. Sadler, Jr., Rev. LaVan B. Davis. 
University Faculties — Rev. Charles L. Winters, Jr., Th.D., Arthur B. Dugan, B.Litt., 

Norman T. Dill, B.A., Bayly Turlington, Ph.D. 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees — Rev. David W. Yates, Sewanee, Tennessee. 



*Altemate, 1964. 



200 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 



THE ASSOCIATED ALUMNI 



the university of the south 
Officers, 1964-65 

John P. Guerry, '49, President Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

R. Morey Hart, '34, Vice-President for Church Support Pensacola, Fla. 

Tracy H. Lamar, '42, Vice-President for School of Theology Knoxville, Tenn. 

L. Spires Whitaker, '31, Vice-President for Capital Funds Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Frederick R. Freyer, '29, Vice-President for Bequests Coral Gables, Fla. 

Dudley C. Fort, '34, Vice-President for Regions Nashville, Tenn. 

James W. Gentry, Jr., '50, Vice-President for Admissions Chattanooga, Tenn. 

W. Sperry Lee, '43, Vice-President for Classes Jacksonville, Fla. 

William E. Ward, A'4S, Vice-President for SMA Nashville, Tenn. 

Philip B. Whitaker, '55, Recording Secretary Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

F. Clay Bailey, '50, Treasurer Nashville, Tenn. 

Arthur Ben Chitty, '35, Executive Director and Editor of Sewanee News 

Sewanee, Tenn. 
Rt. Rev. Frank A. Juhan, '11, Chairman for Second Century Fund .... Sewanee, Tenn. 



ST. LUKE'S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
Officers, 1964-65 

Tracy H. Lamar, T'42, President Knoxville, Tenn. 

Robert E. Ratelle, 1^47, Vice-President Alexandria, La. 

Julian L. McPhillips, ^62, Secretary Birmingham, Ala. 



SEWANEE MILITARY ACADEMY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Officers, 1964-65 

William E. Ward, III, A'4S, President NashviUe, Tenn. 

Rudolph J. Muelling, Jr., A'43, Vice-President Lexington, Ky. 

Douglas L. Vaughan, Jr., A'30, C3S, Treasurer Sewanee, Tenn. 

C. Quintard Wiggins, HI, A's6, Alumni Director Sewanee, Tenn. 



COMMENCEMENT DAY 201 

COMMENCEMENT DAY 

June 7, 1964 



[ 



Latin Salutatory 

Robert Guerard Dillard Tennessee 

Valedictory Oration 

Michael Kent Curtis Texas 



AWARD OF MEDALS AND PRIZES 

The Algernon Sydney Sullivan Medallion for Character 

Raydon Eiland Alexander Texas 

The South Carolina Medal for Latin 

William Jemison Mims Florida 

The Isaac Marion Dwight Medal for Greek 

LeRoy McClure Carter Tennessee 

The Guerry Award for Excellence in English 

Franklin Gorham Burroughs, Jr South Carolina 

Frank Oliver Hansberger, III Georgia 

Charles Pressley Roberts TIsdale South Carolina 

Robert Vernon Weston South Carolina 

The Henry Stanley Allan Award for Imaginative Writing 

Robert Vernon Weston South Carolina 

The George Thomas Shettle Prize in the School of Theology 
for the Best Reading of a Prayer Book Service 

William Bowlyne Fisher Tennessee 

The E. G. Richmond Prize for Social Science 

Michael Kent Curtis Texas 

The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in Tennessee 
Grant-In-Aid for Graduate Study in American History 

Forrest DIckerson Nowlln, Jr Minnesota 

The Allen Farmer Award for Forestry 

Evander Roderick Mclver, III South Carolina 

The Susan Beatty Memorial Prize 
Awarded to the student who makes the greatest improvement in General Chemistry 

Roderick Cameron Webb, Jr Florida 

The Class of 1935 Prize for Improvement in Organic Chemistry 

Joseph Thomas Johnson Tennessee 



202 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

AWARD OF SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 1964-65 

The Thomas O'Connor Scholarship 

for Highest Scholastic Attainment for Three Years 

John Bagster Fretwell Florida 

The Charles Pollard Marks Scholarship 

for Outstanding Junior Gownsman 

Jack Palmer Sanders Kansas 

The Ruge Scholarships for Honor Students from Florida 

John Bagster Fretwell, for Senior Year Coral Gables 

Norman Brunner Feaster, II, for Junior Year Jensen Beach 

Richard Wallace Oberdorfer, for Sophomore Year Jacksonville 

The Atlee Heber HoflF Memorial Scholarship for Attainment in Economics 

Westervelt Terhune Ballard Louisiana 

The Atlee Henkel Hoff Memorial Scholarship for Attainment in Economics 

Dudley Saunders Weaver Tennessee 

The Louis George Hoff Memorial Scholarship for Attainment in Chemistry 

William Bradford Lee Texas 



STUDENTS ELECTED TO MEMBERSHIP IN PHI BETA KAPPA 
SINCE JUNE 1963 

Elected as Juniors 

John Bagster Fretwell 

Alexander Henderson Lumpkin 

Harrill Coleman McGInnIs 

Jack Palmer Sanders 
Frank Weiland Stubblefield 

Elected as Seniors 

Franklin Gorham Burroughs, Jr. Richard Edson Israel 

Michael Kent Curtis Chrlstoper Paul KIrchen 

David G. DeVore, III Bertram Gresh Lattimore, Jr. 

Robert Guerard Dillard Terry Cean Poe 

James MIddleton FItzSImons, Jr. Michael Vincent Raphael Thomason 

Michael Charles Flachmann Charles Pressley Roberts Tlsdale 

Donald Warner Griffis David Edward Whiteside 

Frank Oliver Hansberger, III James Burnette Wood 



DEGREES CONFERRED 203 

CONFERRING OF DEGREES 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Bachelor of Arts 

Martin Luther Agnew, Jr. (History) Meridian, Miss. 

Bruce Winslow Aldrlch (French) Longmeadow, Mass, 

Raydon Eiland Alexander (Classical Languages) San Antonio, Tex. 

Harry Livmgston Babbit, Jr. (Political Science) Port St. foe, Fla. 

Robert Francis Baker, Jr. (English) Florence, S. C. 

Robert Ray Black (English) Birmingham, Ala. 

George Bradford Bocock (Mathematics) Ridgetop, Tenn. 

John Reid Bondurant (Political Science) Memphis, Tenn. 

Allan Mclver Bostick, Jr. (Biology) Quincy, Fla. 

Harry Willard Brooks (English) High Point, N. C. 

James Samuel Brown, Jr. (English) Leland, Miss. 

Douglas William Bulcao (Political Science) Slidell, La. 

Franklin Gorham Burroughs, Jr. (English) {Magna cum Laude) Conway, S. C. 

Patrick Lowell Byrne (Philosophy) Jacksonville, Fla. 

William Harwood Byrnes (English) Rome, Italy 

Wentworth Caldwell, Jr. (History) Nashville, Tenn. 

George Reid Calhoun, IV (Mathematics) Seaford, Del. 

Dale Levan Carlberg, Jr. (Political Science) Jeffersonville, Ind. 

Thomasi Landress Chamberlain (English) Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

Ross Carlton Clark (Biology) {In absentia) Lexington, Va. 

Nicholas Hamner Cobbs, Jr. (History) Greensboro, Ala. 

James Franklin Cofer (Biology) Soddy, Tenn. 

Richard Randolph Cooper (Political Science) Winter Park, Fla. 

Douglass Culp (Political Science) {In absentia) Birmingham, Ala. 

Warren Leigh Culpepper (Economics) (Mathematics) {cum Laude) .... Atlanta, Ga. 

Michael Kent Curtis (Political Science) {Summa cum Laude) Galveston, Tex. 

William Franklin Daniell (English) Port St. Joe, Fla: 

Samuel Godfrey Dargan (Economics) {cum Laude) Conway, S. C 

Robert Phelps Davis (Biology) Golf, III. 

David G. DeVore, HI (Philosophy) {Magna cum Laude) Cincinnati, Ohio' 

Michael Finley Dicus ( Spanish) San Antonio, Tex.. 

Robert Guerard Dillard (Biology) {Summa cum Laude) Memphis, Tenn. 

Richard Bynum Dobbin (English) Spruce Pine, N. C. 

Charles Pinckney Donnelly, HI (Political Science) Corpus Christi, Tex. 

Kirkwood Robert Dormeyer (Political Science) Buffalo, N. Y. 

Guy Roosevelt Dotson (Economics) Winchester, Tenn. 

Henry Cuttino Dozier, HI (Political Science) Ocala, Fla. 

Prescott Nelson Dunbar (History) Baton Rouge, La. 

Daniel Dunscomb Duncan, HI (Political Science) Russellville, Ky. 

John Davis Duncan (English) Nevada, Mo. 

David Goddard Dye (English) Atlanta, Ga. 

Charles Thomas Farrar (Philosophy) New York, N. Y^ 



204 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Hill Ferguson, III (Political Science) Decatur, Ala. 

James Middleton FitzSimons, Jr. (English) {Magna cum Laude) Atlanta, Ga. 

Michael Charles Flachmann (English) (cum Laude) St. Louis, Mo. 

Thomas William Floyd (English) Andalusia, Ala. 

Bernard Augustus Foster, III (Economics) Chevy Chase, Md. 

John Philip Frontier (Political Science) Avondale Estates, Ga. 

Robert Wayne Gardner, Jr. (Economics) Nashville, Tenn. 

Robert Edward Giannmi (English) {cum Laude) Winter Park, Fla. 

Walter Bruce Gibson (Chemistry) {cum Laude) Stamford, Conn. 

Donald Warner Griffis (History) {cum Laude) San Angelo, Tex. 

Edward Lanham Groos (Spanish) San Antonio, Tex. 

William Whitner Haden (History) {In absentia) Hendersonville, N. C. 

John Brown Hagler, Jr. (Political Science) Lenoir City, Tenn. 

Taber Hamilton, III (Political Science) Hamden, Conn. 

Frank Oliver Hansberger, III (English) {Magna cum Laude) Atlanta, Ga. 

William Wright Heard (Economics) Tulsa, Okla. 

George Kenneth Grant Henry (English) AsheviUe, N. C. 

William Brunson Hoole, Jr. (English) Florence, S. C. 

Lacy Harris Hunt, II (Economics) {cum Laude) Houston, Tex. 

John Pierce Ingle, III (Political Science) Jacksonville, Fla. 

John Harland Ingram, Jr. (Philosophy) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Harold Stephen Jackson (History) New Albany, Miss. 

Ellison Capers Johnson, Jr. (History) {In absentia) Mt. Pleasant, S. C. 

Grier Patterson Jones (Political Science) Fort Worth, Tex. 

William Woolverton Kirby-Smith ( Biology) Sewanee, Tenn. 

Christopher Paul Kirchen (English) {cum Laude) Memphis, Tenn. 

Jerry Dudley Kizer, Jr. (Political Science) Brownsville , Tenn. 

James Andrew Rolling, Jr. (Political Science) Newport News, Va. 

Harwood Koppel (History) {In absentia) Nashville, Tenn. 

Robert Stephen Kring (Economics) {In absentia) Ormond Beach, Fla. 

Bertram Gresh Lattimore, Jr. (History) {cum Laude) East Aurora, N. Y. 

Warren Gibson Lett (Biology) {In absentia) New Orleans, La. 

James Stuart McDanlel (Biology) Atlanta, Ga. 

John Arthur McDonald (Philosophy) Newellton, La. 

Tohn Dinkins McDowell, Jr. (English) Blytheville, Ark. 

Jerry Larry Mabry (Political Science) {cum Laude) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Frank Larry Majors (History) Sewanee, Tenn. 

Michael David Martin (English) Lakeland, Fla. 

Richard Lowell Mason (Mathematics) Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Thomas Dilworth Stewart Mason (English) Atlanta, Ga. 

Paul Joseph Matte, III (English) Phoenix, Ariz. 

Alfred Miller, III (English) Jacksonville, Fla. 

William Jemlson MIms (Classical Languages) Pensacola, Fla. 

Samuel Gwin Mounger, Jr. (English) Greenwood, Miss. 

Daniel Buntin Murray (Economics) Nashville, Tenn. 

Ellis Emeen Neder, Jr. (English) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Forrest Dickerson Nowlln, Jr. (History) {cum Laude) Minneapolis, Minn. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 205 

Dwight Eugene Ogler, Jr. (Philosophy) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Joseph Andrew Owens, II (Political Science) Beaumont, Tex. 

Knowles Richard Parker (Economics) {cum Laude) Atlanta, Ga. 

Peter Pierson Parker, Jr. (Economics) New York, N. Y. 

Felix Chisolm Pelzer (Political Scien'ce) (cum Laude) Charleston, S. C. 

James Michael Pemberton (English) Nashville, Tenn. 

George Matthews Powell, IV (English) South Charleston, W. Va. 

James Sterlmg Price (Bblogy) {cum Laude) Knoxville, Tenn. 

Robert Williams Rice (Philosophy) Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Willard Paul Rietzel (Economics) Wethers field, Conn. 

William Franklin Roeder, Jr. (Political Science) Falls Church, Fa. 

Jack AUensworth Royster, Jr. (Mathematics) Nashville, Tenn. 

William Hansell Rue, Jr. (Economics) Andalusia, Ma. 

Thomas Sheridan Sadler, Jr. (Political Science) {In absentia) Davidson, N. C. 

Wilson McPhail Sadler (Political Science) {In absentia) Davidson, N. C. 

John Waltz Salvage (Mathematics) (Physics) {cum Laude) Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

Robert Jordan Sanders (Mathematics) Merriam, Kan. 

Alfred Charles Schmutzer, Jr. (Political Science) {cum Laude) .... Sevierville, Tenn. 

Winston Gage Smith (History) Bethesda, Md. 

Harvy Lamed Snider (Biology) {cum Laude) Russellville, Ky. 

David Lee Speights (English) {cum Laude) Nashville, Tenn. 

Victor Paul Stanton (English) Mobile, Ala. 

John Richard Stephenson (Mathematics) Dalton, Ga. 

William Lundeen Stirling (Political Science) {cum Laude) Columbia, S. C. 

Julius Seth Swann, Jr. (History) Gadsden, Ala. 

Johannes Bengston Sylvan, III (English) Dallas, Tex. 

Edwin Hunter Taylor (Economics) Johnson City, Tenn. 

Richard Scott Taylor (Economics) Atlanta, Ga. 

Robert Walton Thomas, Jr. (German) Ridgeway, S. C. 

Michael Vincent Raphael Thomason (History) {Magna cum Laude) 

West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Donald Henry Crenshaw Timberlake (History) Ellerson, Fa. 

Charles Pressley Roberts Tisdale (English) {Magna cum Laude) 

Orangeburg, S. C. 

John Alan Todd, Jr. (Spanish) Harrison, Ark. 

Joel Urquhart Tompkins (English) Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Thomas Malone Trabue, Jr. (Spanish) Nashville, Tenn. 

Joseph Finch Trimble (Political Sciente) Monroe, La. 

Stephen Edward Walker (History) {cum Laude) Freer, Tex. 

Allen Meadors Wallace (English) Nashville, Tenn. 

John Marshall Walton, Jr. (Political Science) Decatur, Ga. 

William Cheatham Weaver, HI (History) Nashville, Tenn. 

Morton Monroe Webb, Jr. (Economics) Shelby ville, Ky. 

Paul Hamilton Waring Webb (History) Sewanee, Tenn. 

Blanchard Burrows Weber (French) {In absentia) Huntsville, Ala. 

Robert Vernon Weston (English) {cum Laude) Charleston, S. C. 

Stephen Pettus White, III (English) {cum Laude) Hopkinsville, Ky. 



206 



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 



David Edward Whiteside (Philosophy) (cum Laude) New Orleans, La. 

Wythe Lawler Whiting, III (Philosophy) Mobile, Ala. 

David Herbert Wiltsee (Political Sciente) Atlanta, Ga. 

James Kenneth Wimer (Mathematics) El Dorado, Ark. 

Joseph William Winkelman (English) Keokuk, Iowa 

Bernard Wellborn Wolff (History) Atlanta, Ga. 

James Bumette Wood (Mathematics) {cum Laude) Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Michael David Wortham (Chemistry) {In absentia) Lufkin, Tex. 

Norval Rice Yerger (English) {cum Laude) Greenville, Miss. 

John King Young (French) Atlanta, Ga. 

Bachelor of Science in Forestry 

Thomas Lawrence Beasley Franklin, Tenn. 

Evander Roderick Mclver, HI Conway, S. C. 

Edward Alden McLellan, Jr New Orleans, La. 

Michael Hall Moisio Kirkwood, Mo. 

William Bradford Wheeler Wadesboro, N. C. 

Kenneth Mitchell Wiggins, Jr Wheaton, III. 

Master of Arts in Teaching 

Richard Allen Reeves, B.S Fort Wayne, Ind. 



SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 

Licentiate in Theology 

Norman Dale Crews, B.S. {Harrisburg) Camp Hill, Pa. 

Walter Glen Norcross {Michigan) Owosso, Mich. 

Thomas Harrington White, B.S. {West Texas) Cibolo, Tex. 

Bachelor of Divinity 

Hugh Wilmer Agricola, Jr., A.B., LL.B. {Alabama) Gadsden, Ala. 

Peter Hess Beckwith, A.B. {Michigan) Jackson, Mich. 

Robert Joseph Brown, B.A. {South Florida) Boca Raton, Fla. 

LeRoy McClure Carter, A.B. {Tennessee) Chattanooga, Tenn. 

The Rev. James Powell Eaton, BA. {Dallas) Toccoa, Ga. 

William Bowlyne Fisher, B.S. ( Tennessee) Ripley, Tenn. 

William Lansing Hobart, B.S.F., M.F. {Arkansas) Charlottesville, Fa. 

Calvin Van Kirk Hoyt, B.A. {Bethlehem) Shillington, Pa. 

Carl Eldridge Jones, A.B., M.Ed. {North Carolina) Smithfield, N. C. 

Richard Douglas Reece, B'.A. {Tennessee) Memphis, Tenn. 

Charles Tedford RInes, A.B. {California) {Optime Merens) {In absentia) 

Salinas, Calif. 

Onell Aslselo Soto {Cuba) Havana, Cuba 

Warner Armstrong Stringer, Jr., B.A. {Florida) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Milton King Wright, B.A. {Southern Virginia) Hampton, Fa. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 207 

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 

Master of Sacred Theology 

The Rev. Arthur William Archer, S.T.B. {In absentia) Toledo, Ohio 

The Rev. Gardner WilHam Bridges, S.T.B St. Marys, Pa. 

The Rev. George Harold Cave, Jr., S.T.B Marathon, Fla. 

The Rev. John Robert Hanson, B.D Everett, Mass. 

The Rev. John McKee, HI, B.D New Orleans, La. 

The Rev. George Maurice Small, B.D. {In absentia) Fayetteville, Ark. 



DEGREES HONORIS CAUSA 

Doctor of Civil Law 

Owen Robertson Cheatham, LLJD., D.Sc New York, N. Y. 

John M. Wolff, LL.D St. Louis, Mo. 

Doctor of Divinity 

The Rt. Rev. John Adams Pintkney, G.D Columbia, S. C. 

The Very Rev. Lawrence Rose, BA., S.T.B., S.T.D., D.D New York, N. Y. 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Academic Requirements SI-S2 

A'cademic Hoods 115 

Academic Year 49 

Admmistration, Officers of 25-29 

Admission, to the University 32 

Early Decision Plan 47-48 

Requirements for the College 45-47 

Requirements for the School of Theology 112 

Advanced Standing 48-49 

Advising System 50 

Aerospace Studies, Instruction in 57-6o 

Airport 37 

Art Gallery 34 

Associated Alumni, Officers of 200 

Associations, Educational 32 

Athletics 36 

Automobiles 41 

Aviation 37 

Band 88 

Biology, Instruction in 60-63 

Board of Regents I97 

Board of Trustees 198-199 

Buildings 12-16 

Calendar, of the College 4 

Of the School of Theology 5 

Cap and Gown 41 

Certificate, Admission by 46-47 

Chemistry, Instruction in 63-65 

Choir 88 

Church History Field, Instruction in 123 

Civil Engineering, Instruction in 65 

Classical Languages, Instruction in 65-68 

Qassification of Students 50 and 112, 127 

Clinical Training Program 116 

College Board Examinations 45-46 

Commencement, 1964 201-207 

Committees, of the University 30 

Of the College 44 

Of the School of Theology no 

Comprehensive Examinations, in the College 54 

Courses Required m the College 53 

Courses of Study, in the College 57-ioi 

In the School of Theology 1 19-126 

In the Graduate School of Theology 131-132 

In the Summer Institute 138-139 

In the Summer School 105-108 



INDEX 209 

PAGE 

Cum Laude SS 

Credit by Examination 54 

Curriculum in the School of Theology 115-116 

Degrees : 

Applications for S3 

Awarded in 1964 203-207 

Conferred by the University 32 and 53-54 

Requirements for B.A. and B.S. m Forestry 53 

Requirements for BD 1 14 

Requirements for MA.T 136-137 

Requirements for S.T.M 114-11S and 128 

With Honors 55 and 102 

Discipline 34-35 

Domain and Buildmgs 12-16 

Dormitories 14 and 40 

Dropping Courses 52-53 

Economics, Instruction in 68-71 

Engmeering, Combined Plan 55-56 

Engineermg, Instruction in 65 

English, Instruction in 71-73 

Entrance Certificates 46-47 

Entrance Examinations 45-46 

Expenses 38-40 

In the College 38 

In the School of Theology 38 

In the Graduate School of Theology 129-130 

Faculty of the University 17-24 

Faculty of the Graduate School of Theology 130-132 

Faculty of the Summer Institute of Science and Mathematics 140 

Fees: 

In the College 38-40 

In the School of Theology 38 

In the Graduate School of Theology 129-130 

Fine Arts, Instruction in 73-75 

Forestry, Instruction in 76-79 

Fraternities 35 

French, Instruction in 8081 

German, Instruction in 81-82 

Gownsmen, Order of 34-35 

Eligibility for 5051 

Grading System 50 

Graduate School of Fheology 127 

Graduation Requirements 52 and 113 



210 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 



PAGE 

Greek: 

Instruction in the College 67 

Instruction in the School of Theology 1 19-120 

Hebrew, Instruction in 119 

History, Instruction in 82-85 

History, Church, Instruction in 123 

History and Objectives of the University 7-1 1 

Honor Code 35 

Honors, Awarded in 1964 201-202 

Hoods 115 

Hospital 13 

Information, General 32-41 

Instruction, Officers of 17-24 

Laboratory Fees 38 

Late Registration 38 and 49 

Latin, Instruction m 67-68 

Laundry 38 and 40 

Lectures and Concerts 36 and 126 

Library 16 and 32-33 

Licentiate in Theology 113 

Literary Societies 35 

Location 12 

Major Requirements 54 

Mathematics, Instruction in 85-87 

Matriculation 49 

Matrons > 29 

Medals: 

Awarded in 1964 201 

Awarded in the Air Force ROTC 163 

In the College 162 

In the School of Theology 163 

Military Service 37 

Mountain Goat 41 

Music, Instruction in 87-88 

National Affiliations 32 

New Testament, Instruction in 119-121 

Objectives, Educational 7-1 1 

Old Testament, Instruction in 119 

Optime Merens 114 

Organizations 35 

Pan-Hellenic Council 35 

Pastoral Theology Field, Instruction in 123-125 



INDEX 211 

PAGE 

Phi Beta Kappa 35 

Philosophy, Instruction in 88-91 

Physical Education, Instruction in 91-92 

Physical Examination 46 

Physics, Instruction in 92-94 

Political Science, Instruction In 94-97 

Pre-Medical Curriculum 56 

Prescribed Courses S3 

Pre-Theological Course 112 

Press, University 41 

Prizes: 

In the College 162-163 

In the School of Theology 163 

Proctors, Student 28 

Professional Schools, Preparation for 55-56 

Psychology, Instruction In 98-99 

Publications, Student 41 

Public Speaking, Instruction In 99 

Purple, Sewanee 41 

Quality Credits 50 

Quantity Credits 50 

Re-admission 52 

Regents, Board of 197 

Register of Students: 

In the College 171-189 

In the School of Theology I93-I95 

In the Graduate School of Theology 192-193 

In the Summer Institute 166-167 

In the Summer School 167-170 

Registration 49 and 112 

Religion, Instruction in 99-100 

Religious Life < 34 

R.equlred Courses 53 and 118 

Requirements, Academic S1-S2 

Room Assignments 49 

Russian, Instruction in 100 

Scholarships: 

Awarded in 1964 202 

In the College 41 and 142-154 

In the School of Theology 41 and 154-161 

School of Theology, Description of 109-126 

Science and Mathematics, Summer Institute of 135-140 

Senate, University 31 

Sewanee Military Academy Alumni Association, Officers of 200 



212 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

PAGE 

Sewanee Review 4" 

Spanish, Instruction in lOl 

Special Students SO and 113 

St. Luke's Alumni Association, Officers of 200 

St. Luke's Journal 41 and 126 

St. Luke's Society 126 

Student Aid 142-161 

Student Union 13-14 

Summary of the Enrollment 190 and 195 

Summer Institute 135-140 

Summer School, College 103-108 

Supplementary Electives 125-126 

Suspension, Academic 52 

Systematic Theology Field, Instruction in 121-123 

Theology, Instruction in 1 19-126 J 

Transfer Credits 48-49 1 

Trustees, Board of 198-199 

Tuition 38-40 

Vaccination 36 

Year, Academic 49 




of f(?e Souih 



k 



T 



SEWANEE, TENNESSEE 



I 



Announcements 
For 1966-67 



CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 

Inquiries should be addressed as follows: 

The Director of Admissions. 

Admission to the College; scholarships and financial aid; 
catalogues. 

The Dean of the School of Theology. 

All matters pertaining to the School of Theology, including 
admission of students, scholarships, housing, curriculum, and 
faculty appointments. 

The Dean of the College. 

Academic regulations; curriculum; faculty appointments. 

The Dean of Men. 

Student counseling; class attendance; student conduct; stu- 
dent housing; military service; placement of graduates. 

The Registrar. 

Transcripts and academic records. 

The Treasurer. 

Payment of bills. 

The Alumni Director. 

Alumni Associations; Public Relations; History of the Uni- 
versity. 

The Provost. 

Financial matters; physical equipment; employment of per- 
sonnel; medals and prizes. 

The Vice-Chancellor. 

General Administrative Affairs. 



The Bulletin of the University of the South, Volume 60, 1966, Number 4. This 
Bxilletin is pubHshed quarterly in February, May, August, and November by 
The University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. Second-class postage paid at 
Sewanee, Tenn. 



Q^ulletin of 



The University of the South 



Annual Catalogue 1965-66 




I Announcements for Session of 1966-67 



The University of the South is located at Sewanee, Ten- 
nessee, two thousand feet above sea level, on a ten-thousand- 
acre campus on the Cumberland Plateau. 

The enrollment in the College of Arts and Sciences is strictly 
limited, thus enabling the College to provide small classes and 
an intimate, personal relation between student and professor. 

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Forestry de- 
grees are granted by the College. Courses are offered which 
provide basic training for business, for forestry, and for ad- 
vanced work in numerous fields, including journalism, law, 
medicine, teaching, and theology. 

The University of the South is a charter member of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Credits from 
the University are accepted by all institutions of higher learning 
in this country and abroad. 

The Honor Code is a cherished tradition among students 
and faculty. There is a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa in the 
University, among other honor and service fraternities. Eleven 
national social fraternities maintain chapters at Sewanee. 

The University has a nationally known program of non-sub- 
sidized athletics. Varsity sports include football, cross country, 
basketball, baseball, golf, tennis, swimming, wrestling, and 
track, in addition to an organized intramural program in these 
and other sports. The University Choir provides training in 
music. Work in dramatics is carried on, with productions 
throughout the year. Students publish a school paper, a year- 
book, a ' handbook, and a literary magazine. 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Calendar 4-6 

The University — History and Objectives 9-13 

University Domain and Buildings 14-18 

Officers of Instruction 19-26 

Officers of Administration 27-3 1 

University Standing Committees 32 

University Senate 33 

General Information 34-43 

College of Arts and Sciences 45-111 

School of Theology 113-138 

Summer Institute of Science and Mathematics 139-144 

Scholarships: College of Arts and Sciences 145-158 

Scholarships: School of Theology 158-168 

Medals and Prizes 168-170 

Register of Students 172-201 

Board of Regents 203 

Board of Trustees 204-205 

Associated Alumni 206 

Commencement, 1965 207-213 

Index 214-218 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1966-67 



College of Arts and Sciences I 

I 

Summer Term 

1966 \ 

June 19, Sunday Dormitories open. 

June 20, Monday Registration 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. 

June 21, Tuesday Classes meet at 8:00 a.m. I 

July IS, Friday Holiday. j 

August 10, Wednesday Last day of classes. j 

August II, Thursday Summer School examinations begin. \ 

August 13, Saturday Summer School examinations end. 1 

First Semester j 

September 11, Sunday Orientation program for new students begins at ' 

6:30 p.m. ; 

Dining hall open for students at evenmg meal. 1 

September 13, Tuesday Registration of new students, 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. j 

Registration of old students, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. \ 

September 14, Wednesday Registration of old students, 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. : 

Opening Convocation at 12:10 p.m. 1 

September 15, Thursday Qasses meet at 8:00 a.m. j 

October 10, Monday Founders' Day. I 

October 22, Saturday Homecoming Holiday. j 

November 23, Wednesday Thanksgiving recess begins at noon. , 

November 28, Monday Thanksgiving recess ends. Classes meet at 8:00 a.m. 

Detember 16, Friday Christmas Holidays begin at noon. ' 

1967 I 

January 4, Wednesday Christmas Holidays end. Classes meet at 8:00 a.m. 

January 19, Thursday First semester examinations begin. 

January 28, Saturday First semester examinations end. 

Second Semester 

January 31, Tuesday Registration of first year students for the second se- 
mester, 8:00 to 10:30 a.m. Registration of old stu- 
dents for the second semester, 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 pjn. 

February i, Wednesday Classes meet at 8:00 a.m. 

February 8, Wednesday Ash Wednesday, Chapel Service. 

March 18, Saturday Spring recess begins at noon. 

March 24, Friday Good Friday. 

March 26, Sunday Easter Day. 

March 28, Tuesday Spring recess ends. Classes meet at 8:00 ajn. 

May 22, Monday Second semester exammations begin. 

May 31, Wednesday Second semester examinations end. 

June 4, Sunday Commencement Day. 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1966—1967 



The School of Theology 

^ Summer, 1966 

July 13 — ^August 17 Graduate School of Theology. 

First Term 
1966 

September 14, Wednesday Faculty Meeting, 10:00 a.m. Openmg Convocatioii 

of University at 12:10 p.m. 

September 18, Sunday Dormitory open for new students. 

September 19, Monday Orientation program for new students, 9:00 a.m. 

September 20, Tuesday Registration of all theological students, 9:00-12:00. 

September 21, Wednesday Begin two day colloquium for all students and wives. 

September 23, Friday Regular classes begin, 8:30 a.m. 

October 6, Thursday Faculty Meeting, 4:00 p.m. 

October 10, Monday Founders' Day. 

October 18, Tuesday St. Luke's Day. Clergy Seminar. 

October 19, Wednesday St. Luke's Day. DuBose Lectures. 

October 20, Thursday Faculty Meeting, 4:00 p.m. 

October 22, Saturday University Homecoming Holiday. 

November 3, Thursday Faculty Meeting, 4:00 p.m. 

November 17, Thursday Faculty Meetmg, 4:00 p. m. 

November 23, Wednesday ....Thanksgiving recess begins at noon. 

November 28, Monday Thanksgiving recess ends. Classes resume. 

December 2, Friday Greek Program for Juniors. 

Reading Period for Middlers and Seniors. 

Faculty Meeting, 4:00 p.m. 
December 15, Thursday First Term Examinations begin. 

Faculty Meeting, 4:00 p.m. 
December 17, Saturday First Term Examinations end. 

Christmas Holidays begin at noon. 

Second Term 
1967 

January 2, Monday Christmas Holidays end. 

Registration of all theological students, 10:00-12:00. 

January 3, Tuesday Classes begin. 

January 5, Thursday Faculty Meeting, 4:00 p.m. 



January 19, Thursday Faculty Meeting, 4:00 p.m. 

January 30, Monday University Charges and Fees due for second half of 

academic year. 

February 2, Thursday Faculty Meeting, 4:00 p.m. 

February 8, Wednesday Ash Wednesday Quiet Day. 

February 16, Thursday Faculty Meeting, 4:00 p.m. 

March i, Wednesday Reading Period begins. 

March 2, Thursday Faculty Meeting, 4:00 p.m. ! 

March 9, Thursday Second Term Examinations begin. 

March 11, Saturday Second Term Examinations end. <i 

Sprmg Recess begins at noon. jj 

1 

Third Term - 

March 20, Monday Spring Recess ends. Registration of all theological 

students, 10:00-12:00. 

March 21, Tuesday Classes begin. 

March 23, Thursday Faculty Meeting, 4:00 p.m. 

March 24, Friday Good Friday. No classes. j 

March 26, Sunday Easter Day. ] 

April 6, Thursday Faculty Meeting, 4:00 p.m. j 

April 18, Tuesday ^ , , ^ , „ ,. . t ^ 

April 19, Wednesday ^^"^^^^ ^^^^^^" ^^^"^^ Lectures. \ 

April 20, Thursday Faculty Meeting, 4:00 p.m. ' 

May 4, Thursday Faculty Meeting, 4:00 p.m. 

May 17, Wednesday Reading Period begins. 

May 18, Thursday Faculty Meeting, 4:00 p.m. j 

May 24, Wednesday Final Examinations begin. 

May 26, Friday Final Examinations end. I 

May 30, Tuesday All grades due. ' 

May 31, Wednesday Faculty Meeting, 10:00 a.m. ' 

June I, Thursday Faculty Meeting, 10:00 a.m. ■ 

Faculty Lunch with Bishops and Trustees, 12:30. ' 

Faculty Meeting with Bishops, 2:00 p.m. 

June 3, Saturday Joint Faculties meet. 

June 4, Sunday Commencement Day. , 

Summer, 1967 ] 

July 12 — ^August 16 Graduate School of Theology. 1 



Calendar for 1966 



JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 



MARCH 



APRIL 



S M T W T F S 

I 

2345678 
9 10 1 1 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 2Q 
30 31 



S M T W T F 8 

.. .. 1234s 
6 7 8 9 10 II 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 



S M T W T F S 

....12345 
6 7 8 9 10 II 12 
13 14 IS 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 ... . 



S M T W T F S 

I 2 

3456789 
10 II 12 13 14 IS 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



MAY 



JUNE 



JULY 



AUGUST 



S M T W T F S 

1234567 

8 9 10 II 12 13 14 

IS 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



S M T W T F S 

I 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 II 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 . . . . 



S M T W T F S 

I 2 

3456789 
10 II 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



S M T W T F S 

..123456 
7 8 9 10 II 13 13 
14 IS 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 



OCTOBER 



NOVEMBER 



DECEMBER 



s 


M T 


W 


T F 8 












3 
10 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 


9 


II 


12 13 


14 15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 27 


28 


29 30 





S M T W T F g 

2345678 

9 10 II 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



S M T W T F S 

....12345 
6 7 8 9 10 II 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



S M T W T F S 



4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
1 1 12 13 14 IS 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



Calendar for 1967 



JANUARY 



S M T W T F S 
1234567 
8 9 10 II 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 



FEBRUARY 



S M T W T F S 
I 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 II 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 37 28 



MARCH 



S M T W T F S 
I 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 . . 



APRIL 



s 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


s 


2 


3 


4 


"s 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 















MAY 



JUNE 



JULY 



AUGUST 



S M T W T F S 
.. 123456 

7 8 9 10 II 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
II 12 13 14 IS 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 



S M T W T F S 



2345678 

9 10 II 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



5 M T W T F S 
.. •• I 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 la 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 34 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 . . . . 



SEPTEMBER 



OCTOBER 



NOVEMBER 



DECEMBER 



S M T W T F S 
I t 

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Printed at 

The University Press 

Sewanee, Tennessee 




THE UNIVERSITY 

HISTORY AND OBJECTIVES 

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH is a Christian institution, 
with a clearly discerned philosophy of Christian education, 
owned by twenty-one dioceses of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church. It has no religious restrictions but presumes the disposition 
of all members of its community to live within the spirit of its con- 
trolling concepts. Young men of all denominations are enrolled in the 
student body. 

The idea of The University of the South was born in a mani- 
festo signed and published by nine Southern bishops attending the 
General Convention of the Episcopal Church in Philadelphia in 1856. 
The leader in the movement was Bishop Leonidas Polk of Louisiana. 
This declaration was an invitation and an appeal to the Church in the 
South to take steps to found an institution of higher learning because, 
in the thought of the bishops' letter, "the establishing of a Christian 
University by our Church is a compelling necessity, for intelligence 
and moral sentiment are the support of government." 

In response to tlhe call of the Philadelphia message, the bishops and 
the duly elected clergy and laymen of their several dioceses assembled 
on Lookout Mountain in Tennessee on July 4, 1857, ^^^ ^^^^ o^ the 
founding of The University of the South as recorded in its his- 
tory. This assembly, which was actually a meeting of Trustees, deter- 
mined by formal resolution to establish a University. The Trustees 
launched plans for the great undertaking, appointed committees to 
carry on the preliminary work, and adjourned to gather again in the 
fall. 

According to agreement, the Trustees met in Montgomery, Alabama, 
on November 25, 1857. Here they named the institution which they 



10 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

were to build "The University of the South" and selected Sewa- 
nee, Tennessee, on a plateau in the Cumberland Mountains, as the 
site and home of the proposed University. And since that time The 
University of the South has been popularly known as "Sewanee". 

At historic Beersheba Springs, thirty miles north of Sewanee, the 
Trustees assembled for the third time on July 3, 1858. The charter 
of the University, granted by the Legislature of Tennessee on Janu- 
ary 6 of the same year, was presented to the Board of Trustees. 
Further plans were made to open the University as soon as possible. 

The cornerstone of The University of the South was laid on Oc- 
tober 10, i860. A great concourse of people gathered in the forest 
on the Mountain top for the impressive and significant ceremony. The 
whole scene was the romantic reality of a magnificent vision come 
true. Bishop Elliott of Georgia placed first in the cornerstone a copy 
of the Bible and then a copy of the Book of Common Prayer. 

Bishop Leonidas Polk of Louisiana formally laid the stone, speak- 
ing these words: "I, Leonidas Polk, D.D., Bishop of Louisiana, on 
this tenth day of October, in the year of grace one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty, do lay this cornerstone of an edifice to be here 
erected as the principal building of The University of the South, 
an institution established for the cultivation of true religion, learning, 
and virtue, that thereby God may be glorified and the happiness of 
man may be advanced." The Honorable John S. Preston of South 
Carolina delivered the oration. Among the many fine statements in 
his splendid address this sentence challenges the attention of men to- 
day as It did at that time: "Unless we are taught to use them in the 
right way, civil and religious liberties are worthless and dangerous 
boons." 

Then came the Civil War. The conflict which raged for four years 
put an end temporarily to all plans to build the University. After 
the War came reconstruction. It appeared that the concept of a great 
Christian university might be lost in the struggle of contending armies 
and in the chaos and uncertainty that followed upon the heels of 
battle. 

But the dream lived on in the hearts and minds of men. After the 
strife was over and as the South began its valiant effort to rebuild it- 
self, men's thoughts turned again to the undertaking which had fired 
their imagination. With heroism and renewed confidence the Church, 
under the leadership of Bishop Quintard of Tennessee, picked up the 



HISTORY AND OBJECTIVES II 

threads that had been broken by the clash of arms and knit them to- 
gether again. 

In 1868 on September 18 The University of the South was 
opened, with an enrollment of nine students for its first session. There 
were only three frame buildings: St. Augustine's Chapel, Otey Hall, 
and Cobbs Hall. But that was enough. Courage had triumphed. 
The University envisioned by the bishops in Philadelphia had been 
established. Since that time many years have passed, years of 
toil and sacrifice on the part of a host of men and women loyal and de- 
voted to Sewanee and her mission, years of victory and defeat, of 
hope and disappointment, years of an abiding and steadfast faith not 
to be denied. The handful of students has grown. Buildings have 
been erected one by one. The University of the South is now com- 
posed of a College of Liberal Arts accommodating approximately eight 
hundred students, and a Theological School of seventy students. Apart 
from and near the University campus and governed by the same 
Board of Trustees is the Sewanee Military Academy, an excellent 
preparatory school of some two hundred and seventy-five boys. 

The first frame buildings of the early period have gone. Beautiful 
stone buildings have taken their place, all constructed of stone from 
the Mountain on which they stand. 

The Campus of the University is one of the loveliest in America, 
with its winding walks, green grass, and majestic oaks. Close by is 
the Mountain's edge with enchanting views of the valley below. 

Here conditions are almost ideal for the pursuit of learning, for 
growth of mind and spirit, for enrichment of personality, for develop- 
ment of nobility of character. 

Just as the establishing of a great Christian university in 1856 was 
a compelling necessity, the strength and permanence of The Univer- 
sity OF the South for the present and the future are also a compel- 
ling necessity. In this day as in that of the inception of Sewanee, in- 
telligence and moral sentiment are the support of government and 
society. In a society of free people there must be intelligence — en- 
lightened minds disciplined to wisdom — in order that the people may 
govern themselves securely and justly; there must be moral sanity and 
understanding in order that the people may possess that righteousness 
which "exalteth a nation." 

Both Intelligence and morality are necessary because the mind 
without the control and motivation of spiritual ideals Is a negative or 



12 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

a destructive agency, and because spiritual idealism without intelli- 
gence is weak and futile. 

The aim and purpose of the University are clearly set forth in the 
following statement formulated by the University Senate: 

"We are definitely committed at Sewanee to the College of Liberal 
Arts as a distinct unit in the educational system of our country, with 
a contribution to make that can be made by no other agency. In an 
age when the demand for the immediately practical is so insistent, 
when the integrity of the College of Liberal Arts is imperiled by the 
demands of vocational training, we adhere to the basic function of the 
College of Liberal Arts: the training of youth in Christian virtue, in 
personal initiative, in self-mastery, in social consciousness, in aesthetic 
appreciation, in intellectual integrity, and in scientific methods of 
inquiry. 

"This function can best be performed in a small college through the 
medium of a faculty of character and distinction maintaining intimate 
personal contact with a carefully selected group of students. 

"As a further means, the curriculum of the College of Liberal Arts 
should not only be of a definite character but seek consistently and 
positively the correlation of the various branches of knowledge by re- 
ferring them to a fundamental principle in the light of which can be 
seen mathematics and physics reaching up through philosophy to the 
knowledge of God; biology, chemistry, and geology as a progressive 
revelation of the creative force in the universe; and economics, soci- 
ology, and political science looking forward to the realization of the 
Christian ideal of human society founded on the Brotherhood of Man 
and the Fatherhood of God. 

"The well-rounded curriculum recognizes the importance of ancient 
languages and literature and conserves thereby the best that there is 
in the past of the race; it gives a position of emphasis to the study 
of the English language and literature, together with a training in ora- 
tory and debate, as necessary to a proper appreciation of our Anglo- 
Saxon traditions; it gives due recognition to pure science, the social 
sciences, and history as indispensable instruments for maintaining an 
intelligent contact with contemporary life and civilization; it Includes 
modern languages and literature as the surest means to a true under- 
standing of the manners and Institutions of those nations who share 
with us the burdens of human progress; it looks to the study of phi- 
losophy as the agency which synthesizes and unifies all departments 
of human endeavor. The educational program of the College of Lib- 



HISTORY AND OBJECTIVES I3 

eral Arts requires the recognition of the sanctity of the human body 
and the necessity for its development in wholesome and well-regulated 
athletics. 

"Furthermore, inasmuch as religious faith is the essential basis of 
right conduct and as that faith is best cultivated through the aid of 
Divine Revelation, The University of the South regards as indis- 
pensable to the realization of its ideals of cultured and useful man- 
hood systematic courses of instruction in the Bible. Finally, as there 
is no true progress without a goal, The University of the South 
states this to be the end objective of its effort in any and all of 
its departments : the realization of the Kingdom of God, which is the 
kingdom of love, as interpreted in the life and teaching of Jesus Christ. 

"The School of Theology is a constituent unit in The University of 
THE South. It is an inevitable result of the idea of Christian education 
in the minds of the Founders. Its purpose is to train godly men to 
become able and worthy ministers of Christ as pastors and priests, 
prophets and teachers in His Church. Separated from the College by 
only the width of a road, it has its own faculty, its own curriculum, its 
own dormitories and student organizations, its own Chapel, and regular 
round of Church services; yet it is integrated socially and intellectually 
into the life of the University Community. It has access to any courses 
offered in the College of Arts and Sciences which constitute appropriate 
extensions or supplements to its curriculum. It shares all public lec- 
tures, concerts, plays, and art exhibitions, and has the full benefit of 
the general University Library and the Emerald-Hodgson Hospital. 
Thus it seeks to combine the advantages of concentration on a single 
common purpose and of contact with people of other vocations and 
mental disciplines so *that the man of God may be full grown, thor- 
oughly furnished unto all good works.' 

"It welcomes to its lovely Mountain home men with a sincere sense 
of vocation to know Christ and make Him known, and offers to them 
the guidance, friendship, and instruction of godly and experienced 
teachers in the Doctrine, Discipline, and Worship of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church." 



UNIVERSITY DOMAIN AND BUILDINGS 




EWANEE, the site of The University of the South, is lo- 
cated on the Cumberland Plateau about midway between 
Nashville and Chattanooga, Tennessee, on a branch of the 
Louisville and Nashville Railroad. U. S. Highway No. 64 from Mem- 
phis and the west to Chattanooga and the south and east passes 
through Sewanee. U. S. Highway No. 41 -A from Chicago to Florida 
also passes through Sewanee and connects with Highway No. 41 at 
Monteagle, Tennessee, about five miles northeast of Sewanee. 

Railroad tickets may be bought to Cowan, Tennessee, six miles away 
from Sewanee. Taxi transportation from Cowan to the University's 
campus is available. 

Bus riders may buy tickets either to Sewanee or to Monteagle, five 
miles away, from which taxi service is available. Plane tickets can be 
bought to Chattanooga or Nashville, with air-taxi or bus service from 
those points. 

Sewanee has telegraph service, express and money order facilities, 
a local bank, and stores in the village as well as the University's store 
on the campus. 

The Domain of The University of the South comprises ten thou- 
sand acres of land in the Cumberland Mountains at Sewanee, Ten- 
nessee, two thousand feet above sea level. Such an extensive Domain, 
completely under the ownership and control of the University, provides 
a rare location for a campus and affords unusual facilities for recreation 
and athletic sport of all sorts. The climate is healthful and invigorating. 

The Domain is beautiful in itself and, reaching in many places to 
the Mountain's edge, presents beautiful scenes of mountains, hills, and 
valleys. 

All permanent buildings of the University are built of sandstone 



THE UNIVERSITY DOMAIN AND BUILDINGS 1 5 

found upon the University's Domain. In the following paragraphs, 
a brief description of each building is given. 

The Emerald-Hodgson Hospital. The Hodgson Memorial In- 
firmary, the first stone building for University use, was erected in 
1877. This building, the gift of the Rev. Telfair Hodgson, D.D., and 
Mrs. Hodgson, in memory of a daughter, was intended for a library 
but, owing to changes in the general plan for University buildings, 
was found to be too far from the central group. In 1899 this beauti- 
ful structure was enlarged and converted into a hospital, with wards 
for both free and paying patients. In 1908 another addition was built, 
containing a well-equipped operating room. On February 10, 191 1, 
this hospital, with the exception of the 1908 addition, was destroyed 
by fire. Liberal contributions made it possible to rebuild on a larger 
scale in 19 12. The new building, which is equipped in conformity 
with modern requirements, is known as the Emerald-Hodgson Hos- 
pital. 

During 1950 the University constructed a pediatric wing with funds 
made available by the generosity of the Lilly Endowment, Inc., of 
Indianapolis, and by the untiring efforts of Dr. Oscar N. Torian. 

In 195 1 the University constructed a new nurses' home, the Frank 
P. Phillips Memorial Nurses' Home, and renovated the old nurses' 
home as an out-patient clinic. Funds for this construction were con- 
tributed by the Federal and State Governments and by Mrs. Frank P. 
Phillips of Columbus, Mississippi, in memory of her husband. 

St. Luke^s Memorial Hall, the gift of Mrs. Charlotte Morris 
Manigault, of South Carolina, in memory of Mr. Lewis Morris, her 
father, was built in 1878 for the use of the School of Theology. In 
195 1 a wing was added, and in 1956-57 the entire building was reno- 
vated. St. Luke's Hall now contains lecture and seminar rooms, faculty 
and administrative offices, the Grosvenor Auditorium, the Library with 
five floors of stacks, a student and faculty lounge, and dormitory rooms 
for forty-six unmarried students. 

St. Luke's Memorial Chapel, the gift of the late Mrs. Telfair 
Hodgson, as a memorial to her husband, the Rev. Telfair Hodgson, 
D.D., at one time Vice-Chancellor of the University and Dean of the 
Theological School, stands a short distance to the south of St. Luke's 
Hall. 

Thompson Hall, named for the Hon. Jacob Thompson, of Miss- 
issippi, was erected in 1883 and enlarged in 1901. Mrs. James L. 



1 6 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Houghteling of Chicago generously provided for the remodeling of 
this buiding as a memorial to her late husband. This building was 
destroyed by fire in March, 1950. It has been rebuilt and contains the 
student union, sandwich shop, post office, and theatre. 

Convocation Hall is one of the most beautiful buildings of the 
University. From 1901 to 1965, it was used as a library. The tower 
that forms the entrance is called Breslin Tower, the funds for its erec- 
tion having been donated by Thomas and Elizabeth Breslin in memory 
of their daughter Lucy. It is modeled after the tower of the Magdalen 
College Chapel, Oxford, and rises to the height of a hundred feet. In 
1900, the Rev. George William Douglas of Tuxedo, New York, placed 
in the tower a clock and Westminster Chimes in memory of his mother, 
Mrs. Charlotte Ferris Douglas. 

Walsh-Ellett Hall contains administrative offices and classrooms 
of the College of Arts and Sciences. Originally this building, erected In 
1890, was the gift of the late Vincent D. Walsh of Louisiana as a me- 
morial to his daughter, Susan Jessie. The renovation of this building, 
completed in 1959, was the gift of the late Dr. Edward Coleman Ellett, 
an alumnus of this University. 

Palmetto, a frame building, is the headquarters of the Air Force 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps. 

Dormitories. Students of the University are housed in modern fire- 
proof dormitories. These buildings, which are centrally located and 
contain matron's quarters, students' common room, and accommoda- 
tions for 40 to 100 students each, are: Hoffman Hall (built 192 1), 
Elliott Hall (formerly Sewanee Inn, built 1922), Cannon Hall (built 
1925), Johnson Hall (built 1926), Tuckaway Inn (built 1930), Gallor 
Hall (built 1952), Hunter Hall (built 1953), Sessums Cleveland Hall 
(built 1955), Benedict Hall (built 1963), McCrady Hall (built 1964), 
and Courts Hall (built 1965). The lower floor of Tuckaway Inn is 
used for the classrooms ajnd studios of the Department of Fine Arts. 
Gallor Memorial Hall contains a dining room for 700 students and 
dormitory space for 80 students. 

Sev^anee Inn, the gift of a few alumni and friends, was opened in 
1958 for the accommodation of visitors. A restaurant adjoins the motel- 
type Inn. 

The Frank A. Juhan Gymnasium, completed in the fall of 1957, 
has the following facilities: a basketball arena seating 1,500 spectators, 



THE UNIVERSITY DOMAIN AND BUILDINGS 1 7 

shower facilities for home team and visitors, a swimming pool con- 
forming to N.C.A.A. standards with adjoining shower rooms, a rifle 
range, bowling alleys, a visiting team dormitory, an intramural gym- 
nasium floor for basketball, volleyball, and badminton, dressing rooms 
for physical education and intramural athletics, two handball courts, 
dressing rooms and showers for the football team, a training room, a 
wrestling room, a gymnastics room, coaches' offices, and a trophy room. 
The Eugene O. Harris Memorial Stadium was built on Hardee Field 
in 1957. 

All Saints' Chapel. The financial panic of 1907 arrested the build- 
ing of All Saints' Chapel, but even in its incomplete form it was for 
half a century the spiritual center of the University. This magnificent 
Church in collegiate Gothic style was completed in 1959. 

The campanile, which is 143 feet high, is known as Shapard Tower 
and is the gift of the Robert P. Shapard family of Griffin, Georgia. The 
tower contains one of the world's best and largest carillons, given by 
W. Dudley Gale of Nashville, Tennessee, in honor of his great grand- 
father, Bishop Leonidas Polk of Louisiana, one of the founders of the 
University. 

Guerry Hall. This building provides auditorium, art gallery, class- 
room, and office facilities. The building honors the late Dr. Alexander 
Guerry, a member of the class of 1910, of Sewanee and Chattanooga, 
the University's Vice-Chancellor from 1938 until his death in 1948. It 
was completed in the summer of 1961. 

The Carnegie Science Hall, the gift of Mr. Andrew Carnegie, is 
a handsome sandstone building providing accommodations for the de- 
partments of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. 

The six-inch telescope given to the University in 191 3 by Mrs. J. L. 
Harris of New Orleans is installed in a well constructed observatory, 
the erection of which was made possible by the generosity of the 
General Education Board. 

In 1957 the College, through Its departments of Biology, Chemistry, 
and Physics, constructed a Radioactive Isotopes Laboratory. This 
laboratory contains the latest equipment necessary for instructional 
and research use of radioactive material. 

The Snowden Forestry Building, built In 1962, contains 10,000 
square feet of floor space. Adequate offices, classrooms, and labora- 
tories with adjoining greenhouse offer the Sewanee forestry student 
the newest and best facIHties in the South. The rooms in the two-story 



1 8 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Stone structure are paneled in different woods and present a working 
laboratory for the student. In this building is displayed a collection 
of 8,600 different wood species. Over 300 gavels, each made from a 
different wood, complete the wood technology collection. 

The Charlotte Guerry Tennis Courts Building, built In 1964 
from gifts of members and friends of the Guerry family, contains diree 
excellent tennis courts that may be used throughout the year. 

The Jessie Ball duPont Library, completed in 1965, is named in 
honor of Mrs. Alfred I. duPont of Wilmington, Delaware. In keeping 
with other buildings on the campus, it is constructed of local sandstone 
in the collegiate Gothic style of architecture. 

The Cleveland Memorial Building, built in 1965, was given in 
memory of William D. Cleveland, Jr., by his widow and members of 
his family. 

In addition to these public buildings, the University also owns a 
number of residences for accommodation of its officers and faculty. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 19 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

EDWARD McCRADY 

BA., LL.D., College of Charleston; M.S., University of Pittsburgh; 

PhJ)., University of Pennsylvania; LL.D., University of Chattanooga; 

ScD., Southwestern at Memphis; L.H.D., Concord College 

Fice-Chancellor 

GASTON SWINDELL BRUTON 

BA^ MA., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Provost and Professor of Mathematics 

The Very Rev. GEORGE MOYER ALEXANDER 

B.A., BX)., S.TM., The University of the South; 

D.D., Virginia Theological Seminary; 

S.T.D., Seabury-Western Theological Seminary 

Dean of the School of Theology 

•ROBERT SAMUEL LANCASTER ; 

BA, Hampden-Sydney; M.A., The University of the South; j 

Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and j 

Professor of Political Science j 

JOHN MAURICE WEBB 

BA^ Duke University; M.A., Yale University; PhX)., Duke University j 

Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and | 

Francis S. Houghteling Professor of American History I 



GEORGE MERRICK BAKER 
BA., Ph.D., Yale Universty; D.Litt., The University of the South | 

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Emeritus, and 
Professor of Germanic Languages, Emeritus 

WILLMM WATERS LEWIS 

C.E., The University of the South j 

Professor of Spanish, Emeritus, and I 

Secretary of the University Senate, Emeritus | 

EUGENE MARK KAYDEN 
BA., University of Colorado; MA., Harvard University 

Professor of Economics, Emeritus \ 

PAUL SCOFIELD McCONNELL [ 

BA., University of Southern California; A.M., Princeton University; AAGO ^ 

Professor of Music, Emeritus, and University Organist, Emeritus 



•On leave 1965-1966. 



20 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The Rev. VESPER OTTMER WARD 

BA., Ohio Wesleyan; S.T.B., Boston University School of Theology; 

S.TM., S.T.D., Seabury-Westem; D.D., Ohio Wesleyan 

Professor of Christian Education and Homiletics, Emeritus 

ROBERT LOWELL PETRY 

BA., Earlham College; B.S., Haverford College; Ph.D., Princeton University 

Professor of Physics, Emeritus 



JOHN SEDBERRY MARSHALL 

B.A., Pomona College; Ph.D., Boston University 

Professor of Philosophy 

ARTHUR BUTLER DUGAN 

A.B., A.M., Princeton University; B.Litt., Oxford University; 

Diploma in Economics and Political Science, Oxford University 

Professor of Political Science 

CHARLES TRAWICK HARRISON 

A.B., University of Alabama; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Jesse Spalding Professor of English Literature 

STRATTON BUCK 

A.B., University of Michigan; A.M., Columbia University; 

Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Professor of French 

CHARLES EDWARD CHESTON 

B.S., Syracuse University; M.F., Yale School of Forestry 

Annie B. Snowden Professor of Forestry 

JAMES EDWARD THOROGOOD 

BA., M.A., The University of the South; Ph.D., University of Texas 

Professor of Economics 

JAMES MILLER GRIMES 

BA., M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolma 

Professor of History 

HOWARD MALCOLM OWEN 

B.A., Hampden-Sydney; MA., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Professor of Biology 

FREDERICK RHODES WHITESELL 
A.B., A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of California 
Professor of German 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 21 

MAURICE AUGUSTUS MOORE, III 

B.S., The University of the South; MA., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Professor of English 

ADRIAN TIMOTHY PICKERING 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Professor of Spanish 

DAVID BENNETT CAMP 

B.S., The College of William and Mary; PhX)., University of Rochester 
F. B. Williams Professor of Chemistry 

♦BAYLY TURLINGTON 

B.A., The University of the South; PhD., The Johns Hopkins University 

Professor of Classical Languages and 

Marshal of the University Faculties 

HARRY CLAY YEATMAN 

BA., MA., PhD., University of North Carolina 

Professor of Biology 

The Rev. JOHN HOWARD WINSLOW RHYS 

B.A., McGill University; L.Th., Montreal Diocesan Theological College; 

S.T.B., S.T.M., ThD., General Theological Seminary 

Professor of New Testament 

ABBOTT GOTTEN MARTIN 

BA., MA., University of Mississippi 

Professor of English 

BRINLEY JOHN RHYS 

BA., George Peabody College for Teachers; 

MA., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., Tulane University 

Professor of English 

ROBERT ARTHUR DEGEN 

B.S., M.A., Syracuse University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Professor of Economics 

ROBERT WILLIAM LUNDIN 
A.B., De Pauw University; A.M., PhD., Indiana University 
Professor of Psychology 

Major GORDON EDWARD HOWELL 
B.S., Auburn University 
Professor of Air Science 

ANDREW NELSON LYTLE 

B.A., Vanderbilt University 

Lecturer in English and Editor of The Sewanee Review 



*0n leave second semester 1965-1966. 



22 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

GILBERT FRANK GILCHRIST 

B.A., The University of the South; M.A., Ph.D., The Johns Hopkms University 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

The Rev. DAVID BROWNING COLLINS 

B:A., B.D., S.T.M., The University of the South 

Diploma with credit, St. Augustine's College, Canterbury 

Associate Professor of Religion and Chaplain of the University 

ALFRED SCOTT BATES 

BA., Carleton College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Associate Professor of French 

The Rev. CHARLES LAYFAETTE WINTERS, Jr. 

BA., Brown University; B.D., Virginia Theological Seminary; 

S.T^., Union Theological Seminary; Th.D., General Theological Seminary 

Associate Professor of Dogmatic Theology 

WILLIAM BENTON GUENTHER 

A.B., Oberlin College; M.S., PhX)., The University of Rochester 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

The Rev. JAMES WILLIAM BRETTMANN 

B.S., B.D., The University of the South; B.LiTr., Oxford University 

Associate Professor of Religion and Assistant Chaplain 

HUGH HARRIS CALDWELL, Jr. 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; M.S., Emory University 

PhD., University of Virginia 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

The Rev. CHRISTOPHER FITZSIMONS ALLISON 

B.S., The University of the South; B.D., Virginia Theological Seminary 

D.Phil., Oxford University 

Associate Professor of Ecclesiastical History 

STEPHEN ELLIOTT PUCKETTE 

B.S., The University of the South; M.S., MA., Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

HENRY WILDS SMITH, Jr. 

BA., Dartmouth; M.F., D.For., Yale University 

Associate Professor of Forestry 

CHARLES O'CONNOR BAIRD 

B.S., University of Tennessee; M.F., Yale University; D.F., Duke University 

Acting Dean of Men, Associate Professor of Forestry, and 

Director of the Summer School 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 23 

MARVIN ELIAS GOODSTEIN 

B.S., New York University; Ph.D., Cornell University 

Associate Professor of Economics 

JAMES THOMAS CROSS 

A^., Brown University; M.S., Harvard University; Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

SAMUEL ALEXANDER McLEOD 

Bj\., M.A., University of North Carolina 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

♦WILLIAM THEODORE ALLEN 

BA., Oberlin College; M.S., PhD., Syracuse University 

Associate Professor of Physics 

The Rev. JOHN MAURICE GESSELL 

B.A., B.S., Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professor of Pastoral Theology and 

Assistant to the Dean of the School of Theology 

CHARLES WILLIAM FOREMAN 

BA., University of North Carolina; M.A., PhD., Duke University 

Associate Professor of Biology 

PAUL RAMSEY 
BA., MA., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

Associate Professor of English ji 

i; 

tTHOMAS FELDER DORN \- 

B.S., Duke University; Ph.D., University of Washington '■ 

Associate Professor of Chemistry n 

GEORGE SHUFORD RAMSEUR jj 

BA., Elon College; M.Ed., Ph.D., University of North Carolina | 

Associate Professor of Biology \ 

HARRY STANFORD BARRETT \ 

Art Students' League; Beaux Arts Academy; University of London, Slade School; 

Heatherley's, London; Julian's Academy, Paris; Le Grande Chaumiere, Paris; ', 

Atelier of Fernand Leger, Paris; Art Center School, Los Angeles 1 

Artist in Residence I 

DOUGLAS LOUGHMILLER VAUGHAN, Jr. I 

B.S., The University of the South 

Lecturer in Economics ■[ 

THADDEUS CONSTANTINE LOCKARD, Je. iii 

BA., University of Mississippi; Mj\., Harvard University 'I 



Assistant Professor of German i 



♦Deceased June 26, 1965. 
tOn leave 1965-1966. 



24 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

The Rev. GRANVILLE CECIL WOODS, Jr. 

B.A., Vanderbilt University; B.D., Virgmia Theological Seminary; 

S.T.M., Yale Divmity School 

Assistant Professor of Liturgies and Patristics 

The Rev. WILLIAM AUGUSTIN GRIFFIN 

B.A., Duke University; B.D., MA., Yale University 

Assistant Professor of Old Testament Language and Interpretation 

WILLIAM BRUNER CAMPBELL 

B.S., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas 

Assistant Professor of History 

Captain J. H. ALLEN KEPLEY 

B.S., Western Kentucky State Teachers College 

Assistant Professor of Air Science 

MARTHA McCRORY 

B.M., University of Michigan; M.M., University of Rochester 

Assistant Professor of Music 

The Rev. WILLIAM HENRY RALSTON, Jr. 

BA., The University of the South; S.T.B., S.T.M., General Theological Semmary 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy of Religion and Ethics 

ROBERT LARRY KEELE 

BA, The University of the South; M.A., PhD., Emory University 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

KENNETH RUDGE WILSON JONES 

BA., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Assistant Professor of French 

JOSEPH MARTIN RUNNING 

B.Mus., St. Olaf College 

Assistant Professor of Music and University Organist 

DONALD BOWIE WEBBER 

B.S., U. S. Military Academy; MA., Duke University 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 

The Rev. HENRY LEE HOBART MYERS 

B.A., The University of the South; ST.B., General Theological Seminary 

Assistant Professor of Pastoral Theology 

JAMES NORMAN LOWE 

B.S., Antioch College; Ph.D., Stanford University 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 25 

Captain JOSEPH ANTHONY MURPHY, Jr. 

B.E., University of Omaha 

Assistant Professor of Air Science 

*CHARLES MATHEWS BINNICKER, Jr. 

BA., The University of the South; M.A., Florida State University 

Instructor in Classical Languages 

IRA BOLGER READ 

B.A., Milligan College; M.A., Ph.D., Emory University 

Instructor in History 

ERIC WOODFIN NAYLOR 

BA., The University of the South; MA., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Instructor in Spanish 

ANITA SHAFER GOODSTEIN 

BA., Mount Holyoke College; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Instructor in History 

HENRY FRANK ARNOLD, Jr. 

BA., The University of the South; M.A., Harvard University 

Instructor in English 

SAMUEL BURWELL BARNETT CARLETON 

BA., The University of the South; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University 

Instructor in Classical Languages 

RICHARD JOHNSTONE CORBIN 

B.A., The University of the South; M.A., Tulane University 

Instructor in English 

LAURENCE RICHARD ALVAREZ 

BA., The University of the South; M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 

Instructor in Mathematics 

ERIC HANS ELLIS 

B.S., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Instructor in Physics 

JAMES WARING McCRADY 

BA., The University of the South; MA., University of North Carolina 

Instructor in French 

GREGORY RUST McNAB, Jr. 

BA., Washington and Lee University; M. A., Tulane University 

Instructor in Spanish 

•On leave first semester 1965-1966. 



26 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

JOHN EDWIN RUSH, Jr. 

A.B., Birmingham-Southern College; PhD., Vanderbilt University 

Instructor in Physics 

JOHN CLEVELAND SALLIS 

BA., University of Arkansas; M.A., Ph.D., Tulane University 

Instructor in Philosophy 

The Rev. WILLIAM ROBERT MERRILL 

B.S., M.S. In Psychology, Iowa State University; 

BJD., Episcopal Theological School 

Instructor 

CHARLES STEPHEN LITTLE HOOVER 

BA., The University of the South; MA., Yale University 

Instructor in History 

RALPH FAIRCHILD PENLAND, Jr. 

B.A., The University of the South 

Instructor in Physics 

C. WARREN ROBERTSON 

B.S., University of Tennessee; M.FA., Tulane University 

Instructor in English and Speech 

HERBERT STEPHENSON WENTZ 

A.B., University of North Carolina; ST.B., General Theological Seminary; 

B.A., M.A., Oxford University 

Instructor in Religion 

The Rev. ROBERT MITCHELL CLAYTOR, Jr. 

AJB., University of Chattanooga; B.D., The University of the South 

Tutor, School of Theology 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 1'^ 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



EDWARD McCRADY, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., LL.D., Sc.D., L.H.D. 
Vxce-Chancellor 

GASTON SWINDELL BRUTON, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Trovost 

The Very Rev. GEORGE MOYER ALEXANDER, B.A., B.D., S.T.M., D.D., S.T.D. 
Dean of the School of Theology 

JOHN MAURICE WEBB, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

The Rev. DAVID BROWNING COLLINS, B.A., B.D., S.T.M. 
Chaplain 

CHARLES O'CONNOR BAIRD, B.S., M.F., D.F. 

Acting Dean of Men in the College of Arts and Sciences 

and Director of the Summer School 

The Rev. MASSEY HAMILTON SHEPHERD, Jr. 
BA., MA., B.D., S.T.D., PhD., D.D., LiTr.D. 

Director, Graduate School of Theology 

The Rev. JOHN MAURICE GESSELL, B.A., B.D., Ph.D. 
Assistant to the Dean of the School of Theology 

DOUGLAS LOUGHMILLER VAUGHAN, Jr., B.S. 
Treasurer 

GEORGE HENRY BARKER, B.S. 
Assistant Treasurer 

HENRY RICHARD MOODY, C.P.A. 
Bursar 

JOHN BOSTICK RANSOM, III, B.A., M.A., D.S. 

Director of Admissions 

BYRON WALTER WILDER, BA. 
Financial Aid Officer 

WILLIAM GREGORY HARKINS, A.B., B.S. in L.S., MA. in L.S. 

Librarian 



1 



28 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Miss CORINNE BURG, B.A., B.S. in L.S. 
Catalogue Librarian 

Mrs. ELLEN BARNETT TIMMONS, A.B., B.S. in L.S. 

Circulation Librarian 

Miss MARY ANNE KERNAN, A.B., B.A. in L.S., MA. 
Reference Librarian 

Miss ISABELL HOWELL, BA., M.S. m L.S., M.A. 
Archivist and Documents Librarian 

THOMAS EDWARD CAMP, B.A., M.S. in L.S. 
Librarian, School of Theology 

Miss MARGARET ELIZABETH NEWHALL, A.B., B.S. in L.S., B.S. in Ed., M.A. 
Assistant Librarian, School of Theology 

WILLIAM PORTER WARE 

Registrar 

ROBERT SAMUEL LANCASTER, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Acting Director of Development 

*ARTHUR BENJAMIN CHITTY, Jr., B.A., MA. 

Director of Public Relations, Executive Director of the Associated Alumni, 

and Historiographer 

Mrs. jean TALLEC 
Campaign Director 

Mrs. FREDERICK RHODES WHITESELL, Ph.B. 
Assistant Director of Public Relations 

WALTER DAVID BRYANT, Jr., B.A., M.A. 
Director of Athletics 

SHIRLEY INMAN MAJORS 
Football Coach and Baseball Coach 

LON SHELTON VARNELL, B.S. 
Basketball Coach 

JAMES HORACE MOORE, Jr., B.S. 
Wrestling Coach, Track Coach, and Assistant Football Coach 

CLARENCE CARTER, B.S. 

Assistant Coach in Football, Baseball, and Wrestling 



*0n leave 1965-1966. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 29 

TED DANIEL BITONDO, B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Physical Education and Swimming Coach 

GORDON EDWARD WARDEN, Jr., B.S., B.D. 
Tennis Coach and Golf Coach 

Major GORDON EDWARD HOWELL, USAF, B.S. 
Commander, Air Force ROTC 

T. Sgt. HERSHEL LEE ROBINSON, USAF 
Supply Supervisor, Air Force ROTC 

T. Scr. JAMES CHESTER WEATHERINGTON, USAF 
Sgt. Mjr., Air Force ROTC 

8. Sgt. albert LEE COLLINS, USAF 
Senior Clerk, Air Force ROTC 

ARNOLD MIGNERY, B..S.F., M.F. 
Officer in Charge, Sewanee Forestry Research Center 

JAMES DONALD BURTON, B.S.F., M.F., M.S. 
Research Forester 

THOMAS EMMET RUSSELL, B.S. 
Research Forester 

GLENDON WILLIAM SMALLEY, B.S.F., M.S. 
Research Forester 

ORIN ANTHONY FAYLE, B.S. 
Acting Administrator, Emerald-Hodgson Hospital 

HENRY TOMPKINS KIRBY-SMITH, M.D. 

Chief of Medical Staff, Emerald-Hodgson Hospital 

JAMES CEDRIC OATES 

Commissioner of Buildings and Lands 
Business Manager and Director of Auxiliary Enterprises 

SOLLACE MITCHELL FREEMAN 

Superintendent of Leases, Military Property Custodian, 

and Manager of the Sewanee Union 

THOMAS GORDON HAMILTON 
Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

ABBOTT GOTTEN MARTIN, BA., M.A. 
Superintendent of the Sewanee Ravine Gardens 

JOHN CALHOUN SUTHERLAND 
Manager of the University Press 



30 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

PAUL WESLEY MOONEY 
Manager of the University Dairy 

RONALD WARD GOODMAN 
Manager of the University Farm 

DuVAL GARLAND CRAVENS, BA. 
Manager of the University Supply Store 

JAMES WILLIAM SHERRILL 

Manager of the University Laundry 

WILLIAM NATHANIEL PORTER 
Manager of Gailor Dining Hall 

ARTHUR CHARLES COCKETT, BA. 

Manager of Sewanee Inn 

LESLIE McLAURIN, B.S., Lt. Col., USAF 
Manager of the University Airport 



PROCTORS 

Benedict Hall: DAVID HAL PASCHALL 

ROBERT LEE SWISHER, Jr. 
Cannon Hall: RICHARD ALBERT DOLBEER, Jr. 
Cleveland Hall: RICHARD LANDON SIMS 
Courts Hall: MICHAEL FORD LAMPLEY 

PAUL EDWARD SPADUZZI 
Elliott Hall: RUPERT ADRIAN WALTERS, Jr. 
Gailor Hall: PHILIP ANDES CONDRA (Head Proctor) 

JOEL ALGERNON SMITH, III 
Hoffman Hall: JOHN BURT SCOTT 
Hunter Hall: THOMAS REID WARD, Jr. 
Johnson Hall: JAMES WILLIAM GWINN, Jr. 
McCrady Hall: NEAL JEROME IVERSON 

DOUGLAS RUSSELL URQUHART 
St. Luke's Hall: CECIL BARON JONES, Jr. 
Tuckaway Hall: DOUGLAS DUANE PASCHALL 
Woodland Apartments: MICHAEL THOMAS FLYNN 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 3 1 

MATRONS 

Benedict Hall: Mrs. ROSALIE CURRY 
Cannon Hall: Mrs. HENRY CHENEY 
Cleveland Hall: Mrs. MARGARET L. JONES 
Courts Hall: Mrs. WILLIAM J. OAKES 
Elliott Hall: Mrs. WILLIAM T. DOSWELL 
Gallor Hall: Mrs. GLENN B. McCOY 
Hoffman Hall: Mrs. MILDRED MOORE 
Hunter Hall: Mrs. HELEN MARTIN 
Johnson Hall: Mrs. W. D. MASK 
McCrady Hall: Mrs. MARY CHANEY 
Tuckaway Hall: Mrs. ANITA WARING 

SAMUEL GRAHAM GLOVER, LL.B. 

Sacristan, School of Theology 

JAMES RAYFORD McLEAN, B.S. 
Assisant Sacristan 

JOHN MILTON McGINNIS, Jr., B.M., M.M. 
Student Organist, School of Theology 

Mrs. KATHERINE KEEN STEWART 
Manager, St. Luke's Book Store 

HEYWARD HAMILTON COLEMAN 
JOHN RANDOLPH WILLIAMS, Jr. 

Student Fire Chiefs 



32 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

THE UNIVERSITY STANDING COMMITTEES 

Administrative Committees 

Athletic Board of Control: Professors Owen, Caldwell, McLeod; 
Vice-Chancellor McCrady; Mr. B. Humphreys McGee; student Robert 
Lee Swisher, Jr. 

Catalogue: Provost Bruton; Deans Alexander, Webb; Professors 
Gilchrist, Moore, Turlington; Mr. Ransom, Mr Ware. 

Faculty Chairman of Athletics: Professor Gaston S. Bruton. 

Fire Protection: Mr. Oates; Professor Cheston; Mr. Hamilton, Mr. 
MdBee, Mr. Vaughan; students Hey ward Hamilton Coleman, John 
Randolph Williams, Jr. 

Lease: Vice-Chancellor McCrady; Professors Bruton, Cheston; Mr. 
Freeman, Mr. Oates. 

Faculty Committees 

Appointments and Promotions: Professors Winters, Buck, Yeat- 
man; Mrs. Goodstein. 

Building Committee: Professors Grimes, Bates, Cheston, Harrison, 
McCrory, Whitesell; Mrs. Goodstein. 

Concerts Committee: Professors Guenther, Caldwell, Lockard, 
McCrory, Ralston, Running; Mr. Robertson. 

duPont Lectures Committee: Professors Gessell, Buck, Woods, 
Yeatman; Mr. Lytle; students Ray William Pradat, Douglas Duane 
Paschall. 

Graduate Scholarships: Professors Dugan, Bruton, Harrison, Rals- 
ton. 

Library: Professors Lancaster, Camp, Gessell, Puckette, Turlington; 
Mr. Harkins. 

Publications Board: Professors Griffin, Baird, Foreman; Mr. Arnold, 
Mr. Gooch, Mr. Lytle; students Heyward Hamilton Coleman, Neal 
Jerome Iverson. 

Research Grants: Professors Ralston, Bates, Degen. 

Tenure: Professors Thorogood, Caldwell, Whitesell, Winters. 



THE UNIVERSITY SENATE 33 

THE UNIVERSITY SENATE 

With powers and duties defined in the Ordinances of the University. 
Composed of the Vice-Chancellor, Provost, Deans, Chaplam, and all Full Professors. 



EDWARD McCRADY 
Vice-ChanceUor, Chairman 

GASTON S. BRUTON 

JOHN S. MARSHALL 

ARTHUR B. DUGAN 

CHARLES T. HARRISON 

STRATTON BUCK 

CHARLES E. CHESTON 

JAMES E. THOROGOOD 

JAMES M. GRIMES 

H. MALCX)LM OWEN 

DAVID B. COLLINS 

FREDERICK R. WHITESELL 

ROBERT S. LANCASTER 

GEORGE M. ALEXANDER 

MAURICE A. MOORE, III 

JOHN M. WEBB 

A. TIMOTHY PICKERING 

DAVID B. CAMP 

BAYLY TURLINGTON 

HARRY C. YEATMAN 

J. HOWARD W. RHYS 

ABBOTT C. MARTIN 

BRINLEY J. RHYS 

ROBERT A. DEGEN 

ROBERT W. LUNDIN 

GORDON E. HOWELL 



34 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

ADMISSION 
The University of the South embraces the College of Arts and 
Sciences and the School of Theology. Statements concerning admission 
will be found in the sections of this catalogue dealing with the two 
schools. Candidates for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences 
should communicate with the Director of Admissions, preferably at 
least a year prior to the date of entrance; candidates for the School 
of Theology should write to the Dean of the School of Theology to 
secure the proper application blanks. 

DEGREES 
The University of the South awards, on due examination, the de- 
grees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science in Forestry, Bachelor 
of Divinity, Master of Sacred Theology, Master of Arts in Teaching, 
and Licentiate in Theology. The honorary degrees of Doctor of Civil 
Law, Doctor of Letters, Doctor of Science, Doctor of Music, and Doctor 
of Divinity are conferred by the Board of Regents. 

EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS 
The University of the South is a member of the Southern As- 
sociation of Colleges and Schools, the Association of American Col- 
leges, the College Entrance Examination Board, the Tennessee College 
Association, the American Council on Education, the Southern Uni- 
versity Conference, and the Foundation of Episcopal Colleges. It is 
a contributing member of the American School of Classical Studies 
in Athens, Greece, and of the American Academy in Rome. The 
credits of The University of the South are accepted by all institu- 
tions of higher learning in this country and abroad. 

THE LIBRARY 

The first permanent stone structure erected in Sewanee, built by 
The Rev. Telfair Hodgson, D.D., was specifically for a library — a 
significant fact, emphasizing the conception of a library as the center 
of intellectual life of the University. This was In 1877, nine years 
after the University opened. This building was found, however, 
to be somewhat remote from the center of University activities, 
and when, at the beginning of the 90's, the Walsh Memorial Hall was 
completed as the chief building for academic purposes, the most fre- 



GENERAL INFORMATION 35 

quently used books were transferred to a large room in this building 
so as to be more accessible. Ten years later, in 1901, this working 
library and all collections of books belonging to the University were 
removed from the cramped quarters in Walsh Hall to the adjoining 
Convocation Building, which through the generosity of an alumnus 
was furnished and equipped for library purposes. This served as the 
main University library building until March, 1965, when the Jessie 
Ball duPont Library was completed and occupied. The new Library 
is an impressive addition to the facilities available to the students, 
faculty, and members of the Sewanee community. Three floors of 
the Library are now in use, with a fourth floor available for future 
expansion. A variety of seating will accommodate approximately 1,000 
persons, and the initial book capacity is 350,000 volumes, with the 
ultimate 600,000. 

The building, centrally located, is completely air-conditioned. Among 
its many attractive features are open stacks, generous provision for 
individual and small group study, faculty research studies, a night 
study room and smoking lounge, a music listening area, and an audi- 
torium seating 100. 

At present the book collection numbers approximately 130,000 vol- 
umes and is growing substantially each year under an accelerated 
acquisitions program. The Library is a designated depository of 
United States Government publications, and also subscribes to the lead- 
ing periodicals of both general and academic value. 

Apart from the regular annual appropriations by the University for 
the support of the Library, there may be noted: 

The Esther Elliott Shoup Book Fund — the income from ^2,000 to 
be used for the purchase of books. 

The Polk Library Fund — ^15,000, the gift of Mr. Frank L. Polk 
in memory of his grandfather and father. Bishop Leonidas Polk and 
Dr. William M. Polk. The income is used for the purchase of books. 

Other funds which contribute to the income of the Library at pres- 
ent are the Prescott Fund for books and periodicals; the Francis Fund 
for books in the field of history; and the William Alexander Percy 
Memorial Fund for the purchase of books by American authors. In 
addition to these endowments the Library has received many special 
gifts of books and money. Notable among the fine collections are the 
Fairbanks Collection of early Florida history; the Manigault Collection 
of folios containing the works of famous medieval churchmen; and 
the Houghteling Collection of American History. 



36 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

All Saints' Chapel is central to the religious life of the University. 
St. Luke's Chapel is the chapel of the School of Theology, but all 
members of the University are welcome to attend its services. The 
University Chaplain lives in close contact with students and is a regu- 
lar member of the College Faculty. The Chaplain is accessible to 
students at all times. 

Students in the college are required to attend chapel as follows: 
Gownsmen, daily chapel 30 times and Sunday services 6 times a se- 
mester; non-gownsmen, daily chapel 35 times and Sunday services 7 
times a semester. In All Saints' Chapel there is a daily service of 
shortened Morning Prayer; Holy Communion is celebrated and Even- 
ing Prayer is said daily except on Wednesdays and Fridays. St. Luke's 
Chapel provides services of Holy Communion and Evening Prayer for 
those two days. During Lent there are special services, including a 
Twilight Service on Thursday evenings. 

College students participate actively, in many ways, in the life of 
All Saints' Chapel. The Student Vestry is an advisory council to the 
Chaplain; students serve as acolytes, cruclfers, and members of the Uni- 
versity Choir. 

There are numerous visitors throughout the year who speak or 
preach in the Chapel. Many of them hold conferences with groups of 
students at the Chaplain's house. 

THE ART GALLERY 

The Art Gallery is, located in Guerry Hall and is under the super- 
vision of the Chairman of the Department of Fine Arts. Exhibitions 
are held periodically during the year, and all are invited to submit en- 
tries. 

THE ORDER OF GOWNSMEN 

Students In both schools of the University — the College of Arts and 
Sciences and the School of Theology — are eligible, after meeting cer- 
tain requirements which are prescribed by the Faculties, to member- 
ship in the Order of Gownsmen. Gownsmen are distinguished by 
their academic dress. 

They enjoy certain privileges and immunities, and they share re- 
sponsibility for maintaining the standards of student conduct. The 
Gownsmen's Committee on Discipline has direct authority to enforce 



GENERAL INFORMATION 37 

certain rules of conduct, and it serves as an advisory committee to 
the Dean of Men in dealing with more serious disciplinary matters. 

Members of the Order are chosen to serve as student Proctors, 
charged with the supervision of behavior and the care of property in 
University dormitories. The Proctors are under the direction of a 
student Head Proctor and are directly responsible to the Provost. 

THE HONOR CODE 

Students in the University subscribe, upon entrance, to an Honor 
Code, which assumes that any adequate conception of honor demands 
that a man shall not lie, steal, or cheat. All examinations are con- 
ducted under this code, and violations of the code are referred for 
judgment to a Student Honor Council, consisting of representatives 
from each class. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

Sopherim, a students' literary society, is the mother chapter of 
Sigma Upsilon; it provides an opportunity for the practice and the 
criticism of imaginative writing. The Debate Council, for students 
interested in public speaking, fosters both local and intercollegiate 
activity in debating and oratory. Purple Masque is a dramatic or- 
ganization; under Its Faculty director. It stages a series of plays 
through the academic year. 

The following honor societies have chapters in the University: Phi 
Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi (scholarship), Omicron Delta Kappa 
(leadership). Blue Key (service). Pi Gamma Mu (social sciences), 
Alpha Psi Omega (dramatics), Sigma Upsilon (writing). Pi Sigma 
Alpha (political science), Sigma Pi Sigma (physics), Omicron Delta 
Upsilon (Economics), and the Arnold Air Society. 

Eleven national social fraternities have chapters at Sewanee: ATQ, 
2AE, KS, OAe, ATA, KA, <&rA, 2N, BOH, AXA, and XW. These 
are governed by the laws of the University and by a Pan-Hellenic 
Council of their own representatives. Each of these fraternities has its 
own chapter house. Gamma Theta is a local fraternity open to all 
students. 

The Waiters' Guild Is composed of students who work in the dining 
hall. Several departments. Including Athletics, Forestry, French, Ger- 
man, Political Science, and Spanish have clubs to further students' in- 
terest and proficiency In these fields. In addition to fraternities, there 
are many social groups for students. 



38 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

LECTURES AND CONCERTS 

The University has an endowed lecture program known as the du- 
Pont Lectures. The lecturers, who are of international reputation, are 
chosen to represent the various fields of knowledge with particular re- 
gard to the fields of theology, humanities and languages, natural science, 
and social science. There are two memorial lectures: The William P. 
DuBose and the Samuel Marshall Beattie. In addition, many organi- 
zations and departments sponsor visiting lecturers in both general and 
particular fields throughout the year. 

The Concerts Committee, under faculty direction, presents annually 
a varied program of music, dance, drama, and films featuring distin- 
guished artists. Student organizations such as the German Club, Jazz 
Society, Choir, Glee Club, and the Purple Masque, as well as the Se- 
wanee Community Theatre, not only provide entertainment but also 
permit participation of interested students. 

ATHLETICS 

The University of the South provides the most extensive and at- 
tractive facilities possible for athletic sports and recreation. In addition 
to the Juhan Gymnasium, described on page 16, the athletic facilities 
at Sewanee are two playing fields for football and baseball, a quarter- 
mile cinder track, a nine-hole golf course, seven all-weather tennis 
courts and an Indoor tennis building. The Domain and adjacent area 
afford an unusual opportunity for hiking, hunting, camping, and caving. 

The University of the South maintains an Intercollegiate athletic 
schedule and an intramural program in all sports. The University Is, 
of course, not responsible for any injuries from participation In athletic 
sports. An Athletic Director, an instructor In Physical Education, and 
trained coaches direct the athletic sports. 

The control of athletics is In the hands of the Athletic Board of 
Control, composed of the VIce-Chancellor, faculty, alumni, and 
student representatives. The University Is a member of the Tennessee 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and the College Athletic Conference. 

VACCINATION 

All students are required to present upon entrance a physician's 
certificate showing a satisfactory immunization with typhoid, smallpox, 
and tetanus toxoid, either a full series or an adequate booster dose. 

It is strongly urged that immunization against poliomyelitis be 



I 



GENERAL INFORMATION 39 

completed or brought up to date. In addition, it is wise for each stu- 
dent, just prior to coming, to have an influenza vaccination. 

AVIATION AND MILITARY SERVICE 

The United States Air Force, in cooperation with The University 
OF THE South, maintains a Reserve Officers' Training Corps which en- 
ables qualified students to earn Air Force Reserve Commissions while 
completing requirements for college degrees. Enrollment in this program 
is voluntary. All ROTC courses give full credit toward graduation. 

The University of the South Airport (Jackson-Myers Field) Is on 
the domain, one mile from the campus. It is 1,950 feet above sea level 
and has one paved runway, with boundary lights, 2,800 feet long lying 
northeast and southwest. The Airport is equipped with hangar, fuel, 
oil, and unicom, and provides pilot training and air taxi services. The 
Hill Luce Memorial Building is used as the pilots' lounge and adminis- 
tration building. 

The Marine Corps offers commissions to a limited number of stu- 
dents through the Platoon Leaders Class (for freshmen, sophomores, 
and, occasionally, juniors) and the Officer Candidate Class (for seniors) 
programs. To enroll, a student must be between the ages of 17 and 
26, maintain a C average, and agree to serve on active duty for a 
minimum of three years. Members of these programs are exempt from 
induction. 



40 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 



EXPENSES, 1966-67 

College of Arts and SaENCES Each Semester 

Tuition $ 725.00 

*Student Activity Fee 42.50 

flnfirmary Fee 15.00 

Room 145.00 

Board 240.00 

Laundry 57.50 

Total $1,225.00 

Students taking work in science pay also the followmg fees: In Chemistry a general 
fee of $8.00 per semester; m Biology a general fee of $10.00 per semester; m Physics 
a general fee of $6.00 per semester; and in Forestry and Engmeering a general fee 
of $6.00 per semester for laboratory courses. 
Students in the ROTC unit pay a fee of $5.00 each semester. 

A student who registers later than the day and time indicated will be required to pay 
a special fee of $15.00. In addition a student who fails to present himself for regis- 
tration will be charged $5.00 for each day he fails to register. 

School of Theology Each SIemester 

Tuition $ 37S-00 

♦Student Activity Fee 42.50 

flnfirmary Fee 15.00 

Room 145.00 

Board 240.00 

Laundry 57.50 

Total $ 875.00 

Rent in Woodland apartments Is $29.50 per month, of which $4.00 Is a charge for 
water. Malntenante fee in diocesan houses and apartments is $30.00 per month; rent 
in Alston apartments and other University houses built for theological students is 
$40.00 per month. In these water is metered. 

The Clmical Training Fee, due the second semester of the Junior year, is $100.00. 

Each student should plan to spend about $100.00 a semester for books and should be 
provided with health and accident insurance for himself and family. 



*$i.oo for subscrlpticai to The Sewanee Purple. 

flnfirmary fee and benefits applicable only to students residing in University 
dormitories, and only when school is In session. 

Note: The University does not carry insurance on the personal belongings of stu- 
dents and therefore cannot be responsible to students for losses Incurred by fire, 
water, or other damage. 

The University dormitories and student dining halls will be closed during the 
Thanksgiving recess, the Christmas Holidays, and the Spring recess. 

Semester charges do not include the cost of board and room during these periods. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 4I 

EXPENSES 

The University of the South accepts a student only for an entire 
semester. The full charges for the semester are due and payable in 
advance upon entrance, and payment of all charges is an integral part 
of the student's registration. Any one who prefers to pay tuition and 
fees in monthly installments, however, may apply for a Tuition Plan 
Contract. Information regarding this method of payment will be 
furnished upon request. 

It is a regulation of the University that any student whose charges 
and fees, regular or special, are not paid in full will not be allowed to 
take his semester examinations. No transcript will be issued for a 
student whose account is unpaid. 

If a student, after registration, is dismissed from the University or 
withdraws for any cause except for illness, he is not entitled to any 
refund of the sum paid to the University or to cancellation of any sum 
due and payable to the University. In the event of a student's with- 
drawal from the University by reason of illness and with the advice 
of a physician, he may receive a refund of one-half of all charges for 
the period of time from his withdrawal to the end of the semester. A 
student is officially enrolled in the University for a semester im- 
mediately upon completion of his registration. 

If a student exercises the privilege of a charge account with one of 
the University's agencies, such as the University Supply Store or the 
Hospital, this account must be paid five days before semester examina- 
tions begin. It is customary for the student to present written au- 
thority of his parent for a charge account at the University Supply 
Store. 

The University does not charge a contingent fee. Any student 
responsible for damage to property shall pay the cost of repairs or 
replacement. All charges for damage to property become part of the 
student's account for the semester and must be paid before the se- 
mester examinations begin. A student is requested to report damage 
of property immediately to the Business Office and to assume respon- 
sibility for the cost of repairs if he is the person responsible. 

The charge for room includes, of course, cost of light, and this is 
interpreted by the University as the reasonable use of electric current 
In lamps or globes of customary size which provide the proper amount 
of light. The charge for room does not Include current used In over- 
sized lamps, globes, electric cooking and heating appliances. The 



42 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

University charges, therefore, a fee of $2.50 a semester for each elec- 
tric cooking or heating appliance. 

Each application for admission to the College must be accompanied 
by an application fee of ^10.00. This fee is not refundable, and Is not 
credited to the student's account. It is designed to offset a small por- 
tion of the expense of processing an application for admission. 

A reservation fee of $50.00 Is required of all students in the College. 
This Is not an extra charge; it is credited to the student's account. For 
students already registered in the University, this fee Is payable by May 
T each year for the following academic year. New students must pay 
this fee by the Candidates Reply Date established by the College En- 
trance Examination Board (usually near the middle of May), or, If the 
application for admission is accepted after that date, within two weeks 
of the date of acceptance of the application. The reservation fee Is not 
refundable, except in those cases in which the student is prevented from 
entering the University by serious Illness, or by being drafted by the 
Selective Service. 

The student activity fee covers athletic privileges, including free 
admission to intercollegiate events, subscriptions to The Sewanee Pur- 
pie, The Cap und Gown, and The Mountain Goat, and the support of 
student activities In general. 

A graduation fee of $10.00 Is charged. 

The Infirmary fee covers care at Emerald-Hodgson Hospital and the 
general services of a physician while school Is In session, but does not 
cover special costs such as surgery, medicine. X-ray plates, and the 
like. 

The laundry fee covers laundry service for the following number of 
articles each week: 6 shirts, 4 suits underwear, 6 pairs socks, i pajama 
suit, 5 handkerchiefs, 3 towels, 2 sheets, i pillowslip, i bedspread, i 
wash cloth, i pair wash pants. For laundry in excess of this total, the 
University charges according to the cost for each article. 

All students are required to live In the University halls or in places 
approved by the University. All students are required to take their 
meals in the University dining halls. This provision does not apply, 
of course, to young me|n, who' live at home with their families in the 
vicinity of the University and who attend the College as day students. 

Each dormitory room Is furnished with a single bed with mattress, 
a desk and chair, bookcase, and closet space for each student. The 
student should furnish his own pillow and bed linens, which should 



GENERAL INFORMATION 43 

include at least 4 sheets, 4 pillow cases, 2 blankets, and 2 spreads for a 
single bed. Some form of desk lamp is also needed. 

Students in the School of Theology should provide themselves with 
a cassock and surplice. Academic gowns may be purchased after ar- 
rival at the University. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Scholarships and other forms of financial aid are available to stu- 
dents In the College of Arts and Sciences and in the School of Theology. 
Details of the financial aid program are given beginning on page 146 
for the College and page 158 for the School of Theology. 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences who are residents of 
Franklin County, Tennessee, or who are sons of Episcopal clergymen 
receive a partial remission of fees at the discretion of the Vlce-Chan- 
cellor. 

THE UNIVERSITY PRESS 

The University Press Is equipped to print ecclesiastical and schol- 
arly books, various journals, yearbooks, and catalogues. 

The Press publishes the regular bulletins of the University, several 
student periodicals, and The Sezuanee Review, a literary quarterly 
edited by Andrew Lytle. Student publications are: The Sezuanee 
Purple, a weekly newspaper; The Cap and Gown, the Sewanee an- 
nual; The St. Luke's Journal, a theological review; and The Mountain 
Goat, a literary and humor magazine. 

AUTOMOBILES 

Freshmen and students with scholarships awarded through the Uni- 
versity may not own or maljntain automobiles, motorcycles, or motor 
scooters. Students who have earned at least sophomore standing may 
own and operate automobiles. Members of the Order of Gownsmen 
will enjoy certain parking privileges which are not extended to other 
students. Exceptions to the foregoing restrictions will be made by the 
Dean of Men only under the most compelling circumstances. Students 
a the School of Theology may own and operate automobiles. All au- 
• mobiles must be registered with the Dean of Men. 



n 



r 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



4-6 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF 
THE COLLEGE FACULTY, 1965-1966 

Faculty Committees 

Admissions and Scholarships: Deans Webb, Baird; Provost Bruton; 
Mr. Ransom; Professors Grimes, Caldwell, Yeatman, Pickering, 
Gilchrist. 

Committees: Professors Caldwell, Keele, Buck; Dean Webb. 

Curriculum: Dean Webb; Professors Goodstein, Pickering, Brettmann, 
Dugan, Camp. 

Degrees: Dean Webb; Professors Buck, McLeod, Moore, Keele, 
Campbell, Lundin. 

Discipline: Dean Baird; Chaplain Collins; Professors Grimes, Camp; 
Dr. Alvarez. 

Honorary Degrees: Professors Grimes, B. J. Rhys, Owen. 

Sabbatical Leave: Dean Webb; Professors Dugan, Owen, Harrison. 

Student Activities: Dean Baird; Professors Webber, Jones; Dr. Naylor. 

Administrative Committees 

Combined Engineering Plan: Professors Caldwell, Camp, McLeod; 
Mr. Ransom. 

Pre-Medical Advisory: Professors Yeatman, Foreman; Dean Baird; 
Mr. Arnold, Mr. Ransom. 

Student Placement: Dean Baird; Professor Keele. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 47 

ADMISSION 

A student wishing to seek admission to the College of Arts and 
Sciences should communicate with the Director of Admissions to obtain 
the proper application blanks and any detailed information which may 
be required. An .application for admission should preferably be sub- 
mitted no later than the beginning of the applicant's last semester in 
secondary school. 

An applicant may be admitted to the College of Arts and Sciences 
directly from secondary school in either of two ways: 

1. By certificate from an accredited secondary school and the results 
of the College Entrance Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude Test. 
A certificate should show at least 15 acceptable units of credit. 

2. By examination. 

Usually, an applicant will submit a transcript of his secondary school 
work during his last year in school, giving the record of work completed 
and indicating courses being pursued during the senior year. Condi- 
tional admission may be based upon this transcript, but final admission 
will await receipt of a transcript showing satisfactory completion of 
the secondary school course. 

The Committee on Admissions is more interested in a prospective 
student's general promise and in the quality of his work than in the 
completion of specifically required courses. But it will give preference 
to applicants who have pursued a regular college preparatory course In 
secondary school. This normally includes the following subjects: 

English, four years Foreign Language, ancient or modern, 

*Mathematics, three or four years two or more years 

History or Civics, one or more years Natural Sciences, one or more years 

*Three years of college preparatory mathematics is considered the minimum prepa- 
ration for a student to pass the required freshman mathematics course at Sewanee. 

College Entrance Examinations: 

Each applicant for admission to the College is required to take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test given by the College Entrance Examination 
Board. College Entrance Examination Board Achievement Tests will 
be required of applicants in English, Mathematics, and a foreign lan- 
guage. Applicants without two years of foreign language credit at the 
junior or senior high school level may substitute an Achievement Test 
in the sciences. 

College Board Examinations are given In centers throughout the 
country in December, January, March, May, and August each 



48 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

year. There is also a September administration of the examina- 
tion at some of the member colleges. Normally, the December, Janu- 
ary, or March test should be taken during the applicant's senior 
year in school. The December or January administration of the 
tests is preferred. 

Information on College Board Examinations, and application blanks 
for the tests, may usually be obtained from the applicant's school, or 
the applicant may write to the College Entrance Examination Board, 
Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey. (Applicants living in New Mexico, 
Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, and states to the west of these should 
write to the College Entrance Examination Board, P. O. Box 27896, 
Los Angeles 27, California). The College Board Bulletin of Informa- 
tion, which will be sent to all persons requesting application blanks, 
lists testing centers throughout the country and abroad. Normally, the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test and the achievement tests will be taken at 
the center nearest the applicant's home or school; a special center will 
be established for any applicant living farther than 5 miles from a 
regular testing center if application for the establishment of the spe- 
cial center is made at least jive weeks before the date of the test. 

There is a small fee for the Scholastic Aptitude Test and for three 
Achievement Tests. The appropriate fee should be returned to the 
College Entrance Examination Board with the completed application 
for the test, and should not be sent to The University of the South. 

Physical Examinations: 

On being admitted to the College, a student will be required to file 
a report of a physical examination and a record of his health. 

Certificates : 

Certificates are accepted from secondary schools which are accredited 
by various regional Associations of Colleges and Secondary Schools. In 
some Instances, certificates may be accepted from schools not on these 
lists whose work is known and approved by the Committee on Ad- 
missions and Scholarships. 

Every student who wishes to be admitted by certificate should write 
to the Director of Admissions for a blank form to be filled In by the 
Principal of his school. 

This certificate, signed by the Principal of the school and containing 
his statement of recommendation, should normally be mailed by him to 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 49 

the Director of Admissions at as early a date as possible following the 
completion of the applicant's seventh semester of school work. Appli- 
cants with superior records who wish to request early decision on their 
applications and who have already taken the College Board Scholastic 
Aptitude Test and the three required achievement tests, may ask that 
the certificate be sent at any time after the beginning of the senior year. 
In this case, the certificate should show the applicant's record for three 
years and should contain a complete list of courses in progress. 

A blank form for the submission of a supplementary transcript at 
the end of the senior year will be sent directly to the school. 

The Early Decision Plan: 

In order to reduce the necessity for many students to file application 
at several colleges The University of the South offers an Early De- 
cision Plan. The Plan is designed for the student whose first college 
choice is The University of the South and whose secondary school 
record, test scores, recommendations, and extracurricular activities 
indicate that he is an excellent applicant. By satisfactorily fulfilling 
the admission requirements the well qualified student may receive 
favorable action on his application by November i of his senior year. 

Procedure : 

The student applying for early decision should proceed as follows: 

1. Indicate by letter that he is applying for early decision, that The 
University of the South is his first choice, and that he will not apply 
to any other college until a decision is reached under this plan. 

2. Present all credentials necessary for admission and, if applicable, 
for financial aid (including the Parents' Confidential Statement of the 
College Scholarship Service) to The University of the South no later 
than November i. If all necessary information has not been received 
by this date, the University does not guarantee a decision under the 
Early Decision Plan. 

3. Fulfill all testing requirements not later than the summer follow- 
ing the junior year. The July test date prior to the senior year is the 
last scheduled testing of the College Entrance Examination Board 
that will assure the candidate consideration under this program. 

4. If successful, the applicant must confirm his acceptance by De- 
cember I with payment of the non-returnable reservation fee of 
$50.00. 



50 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

Under this Plan The University of the South agrees to the follow- 
ing: 

1. To reach a decision on admission and on financial aid, if appli- 
cable, by November 15. 

2. If a definite decision of acceptance or rejection is not reached by 
December i, the U|niversity will notify the student that his applica- 
tion will receive unbiased consideration under the regular admissions 
procedure, and that he is free to make application to other colleges. 
These students will be urged to retake the required tests and to submit 
a transcript of their first semester grades received during their senior 
year. 

3. Not to require the accepted candidate who commits himself to 
matriculate and who pays the reservation fee to take additional ad- 
missions tests. 

All inquiries in regard to the Early Decision Plan should be directed 
to the Director of Admissions, The University of the South, Sewa- 
nee, Tennessee. 

Admission by Examination: 

Students desiring to take, or required to take, entrance examinations 
to satisfy the requirements for admission should communicate with the 
Director of Admissions as early as possible before the date of entrance. 
Preferably, this should be in the fall or early winter preceding the date 
of entrance. 

Advanced Placement: 

Advanced placement may be granted to entering students who, in 
certain courses, pass the College Entrance Examination Board Ad- 
vanced Placement Tests. This advanced placement must have the ap- 
proval of the chairmen of the departments concerned. In some In- 
stances, college credit may accompany advanced placement; see page 56. 

Advanced Standing: 

Students coming from other colleges which are members of their 
regional educational associations should show detailed evidence of the 
work done there in the form of official transcripts from all colleges at- 
tended. On the basis of this evidence, or on the evidence of examina- 
tions, transfer credit will be granted at the discretion of the Faculty 
Committee on Degrees. Normally, credit is granted In all work of a 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 5 1 

liberal nature in which the student has made a grade of C or better. 
Students transferring from other institutions must meet, upon entrance, 
the requirements demanded of our own students. Since the College 
requires two years of residence for a degree, no transfer student may 
be admitted into the senior year as a candidate for a degree. 

ROOM ASSIGNMENTS 
Rooms are assigned by the Dean of Men. Priority in the selection 
of rooms is given to students already in the College; the current occu- 
pant of a room has priority in the choice of that room. Students 
entering the College are invited to express choice of rooms or dormi- 
tories and to express preference for a roommate, though no assurance 
is given that such requests can be granted. An upperclassman who 
has not paid his reservation fee for the following year by the desig- 
nated date forfeits all priority in the selection of a room. Where all 
other considerations are equal, preference will be given in the assign- 
ment of rooms to those applications bearing the earliest date. 

THE ACADEMIC YEAR 

The regular session of the College of Arts and Sciences is divided 
into two semesters. A summer session of eight weeks is also offered. 

The first semester for the session of 1966-67 will begin on September 
II and end on January 28. The second semester will begin on January 
31 and end on June 4. The summer te!rm of 1966 begins on June 19 
and ends on August 13. 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

All students are expected to register at the prescribed time at the 
beginning of each semester. A student who registers later than the day 
indicated in the University Calendar will be required to pay a special 
fee of $15.00. In addition, a resident student who fails to present him- 
self for registration will be charged $5.00 for each day he fails to 
register. 

A student who withdraws from the College without notifying the 
Dean of the College will not be entitled to honorable dismissal. This 
applies to a student who withdraws between the two semesters of a 
single academic year, as well as to one who withdraws during a se- 
mester. 



52 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

ADVISING SYSTEM 

Shortly after registration, each student is assigned by the Dean of 
Men to a faculty adviser who has general supervision of his college 
course and to whom the student may refer any academic or personal 
problems. Each week-day afternoon an academic counselor is on duty 
for consultation. 

THE GRADING SYSTEM AND STUDENT CLASSIFICATION 

The work of students in College courses is graded according to the 
following system: the grade A means excellent; B, good; C, average; 
D, passing; F, failing; I, incomplete. 

The grade I is given only when a student fails to complete the work 
of a course for legitimate and unavoidable reasons. 

Averages are computed in grade points. Each semester hour of 
academic credit with the grade A carries with it four grade points; each 
hour with the grade B, three grade points; each hour with the grade 
C, two grade points; each hour with the grade D, one grade point. 

Class standing and eligibility for graduation are determined by the 
number of semester hours and the number of quality credits a student 
has earned. Each semester hour with the grade A carries with it three 
quality credits; each hour with the grade B, two quality credits; each 
hour with the grade C, one quality credit. 

A Freshman is a student who has fewer than 24 hours of credit or 
fewer than 18 quality credits. 

A Sophomore has at least 24 hours- and at least 18 quality credits. 

A Junior has at least 60 hours and at least 54 quality credits. 

A Senior has at least 92 hours and at least 86 quality credits. 

A Special Student is one who by permission of the Dean of the Col- 
lege is admitted to certain courses without being required to present 
the full entrance requirements or to carry the number of courses pre- 
scribed for regular students. Only students twenty-one years old or 
older may be admitted as special students. Work done by a special 
student will not count toward a degree unless such a student Is accorded 
regular standing. 

MEMBERSHIP IN THE ORDER OF GOWNSMEN 
Membership in the Order of Gownsmen is extended to Sophomore 
students who have a grade point average of 3.0 based on the two most 
recent semesters of college work, have satisfied two semesters of the 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 53 

physical education requirement, and are not deficient in Chapel attend- 
ance. 

Membership in the Order is extended to Juniors at the end of any 
semester in which a Junior student earns a grade point average of 2.25 
provided he has satisfied the physical education requirement and is 
not deficient in Chapel attendance. 

Membership in the Order is extended to Senior students at the end 
of any semester in which a Senior student earns a grade point average 
of 2.0 provided he has satisfied the physical education requirement 
and is not deficient in Chapel attendance. 

Subject to faculty regulation, voluntary class attendance Is a privilege 
of membership in the Order of Gownsmen. 

Consistent with the interest of the University and the principle of 
responsibility, members of the Order are required to attend Daily 
Chapel 30 times a semester and Sunday Chapel 6 times during a 
semester. 

Membership in the Order, with its privileges, shall be revoked by the 
Dean of the College at the end of any semester in which a member falls 
below the grade point average required for membership. 

Membership in the Order may be revoked upon the recommendation 
of the Dean of Men or the Discipline Committee of the College Faculty 
for any disciplinary infraction reflecting upon the principle of respon- 
sibility upon which the Order rests. 

Gownsmen are permitted to hold four morning meetings during a 
semester, each meeting to be held at a different hour. Members of 
the Order shall be excused from classes to attend these meetings. 

Completion of the Physical Education requirement shall not be pre- 
requisite to membership in the Order of Gownsmen for students trans- 
ferring from schools with no comparable requirement. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

All students except first-semester Freshmen will be required to pass 
three courses each semester, each course carrying three or more hours 
of semester credit. A first-semester Freshman will be required to pass 
two courses, each course carrying three or more hours' credit. A student 
whose only previous college experience is a single summer-school term 
will be considered a first-semester Freshman. Students with more 
college experience, regardless of the number of credits earned, will not 
be considered first-semester Freshmen. Semester hours and quality 



54 THE UNIVERSITY OF T^E SOUTH 

credits earned in summer school are considered as having been earned 
during the preceding academic year. 

To be eligible to re-enroll the following year: 

A first-year Freshman will be required to pass not fewer than i8 se- 
mester hours and to accumulate not fewer than 15 quality credits for 
the academic year. 

A second-year student will be required to pass not fewer than 24 
semester hours for the academic year, and to have accumulated not 
fewer than 39 quality credits. 

A third-year student will be required to pass not fewer than 24 se- 
mester hours for the academic year, and to have accumulated not fewer 
than 69 quality credits. 

A fourth-year student will be required to pass not fewer than 24 se- 
mester hours for the academic year, and to have accumulated not fewer 
than 109 quality credits. 

Students who fail to meet these requirements will be suspended for 
one semester. If, after a period of suspension, a student makes formal 
iapplicatlon and is re^admitted, he will be required either to earn not 
fewer than twenty-five quality credits a year or to meet the standard 
for each stage of academic residence. A student who has, for academic 
reasons, been suspended for a semester may apply for re-admlssion 
after the end of the semester of suspension. 

DROPPING COURSES 

During the first week of school, a student may drop a course with- 
out its appearing on his permanent record card. 

Prior to one week before mid-semester, studetnts who have the ap- 
proval of the Dean may drop a course with the grade of "WP" (with- 
drew passing). 

After mid-semester, a student will normally receive a grade of "WF" 
(withdrew failing). However, under compelling circumstances, with 
the approval of the Dean and the Degrees Committee, a student may 
drop a course with a grade of "WP". 

In computing the student's semester or overall average, the grade 
"WP" will be considered as a grade of "D." The grade "WF" will be 
averaged as a failing grade. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 55 

The expression "without penalty" used at any time on a drop slip 
from the Dean's Office to the Registrar's Office will signify a condition 
similar to dropping a course during the first week of school, except that 
the course having now been entered on the student's permanent record 
card, will have a "W" in the grade column. In computing the student's 
average, no grade will be used. 

DEGREES 

In the College of Arts and Sciences, the degrees of Bachelor of Arts 
and Bachelor of Science in Forestry are conferred. 

Applications for Degrees 

All candidates for degrees must announce their candidacy to the 
Dean of the College early in their seventh semester. No student who 
fails to make this application at the time designated will be recom- 
mended for a degree. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF 
ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FORESTRY 

A minimum of 128 semester hours and 120 quality credits is re- 
quired for either the degree of Bachelor of Arts or the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science In Forestry. In order to qualify for a degree, a student 
must meet the requirements^ as prescribed here. 

I. Prescribed Courses 

I. For the degree of Bachelor of Arts: 

(a) A year-course in mathematics. 

(b) Two semesters of laboratory courses in Chemistry, Physics, or Biology. 

(c) English 101-102. 

(d) Two semester courses in Philosophy 01 two semester courses in Religion. 

(e) Completion of one language through the third year level or two languages 
through the second year level. 

(f) History 101-102. 

(g) Economics loi and a semester of Political Science, or two semesters in either 
Economics or Political Science. 

(h) Four semesters of Aerospace Studies or Physical Education, 
(i) Completion of Chapel attendance requirements. 

(j) Before beginning his third academic year of study, a student must have satis- 
fied the prescribed course requirements m English, History, Mathematics, and 



S^ THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

laboratory science. In addition, he must have fulfilled at least one year of 
the foreign language requirement. (Effective September, 1965.) 
2. For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry the same courses are prescribed 
as for the Bachelor of Arts degree except that the language requirement may be 
fulfilled by the completion of one language through the second year level. 

Notes: i. It is possible to satisfy any required course by examination. 

2. The level of language proficiency is usually determined by the use of an achieve- 
ment test. 

3. A minimum of two years in residence, including the final year, is required of all 
those upon whom degrees may be conferred. 

II. The Major Subject 

1. At or before the end of his Sophomore year, a student will select a major sub- 
ject. Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts may major in any one of the 
following departments: Biology, Chemistry, Classical Languages, Economics, English, 
Fine Arts, French, German, History, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physics, Political 
Science, Psychology, Religion, and Spanish. 

2. To be accepted as a major in one of these departments a candidate must have 
maintained at least a C average in the courses already taken In the subject. If, at 
the end of the Sophomore year, a student In good standing in the College is not 
qualified to major in the subject he chooses, he may be permitted to register for an 
additional year in the College; but, if, at the end of the additional year, he is still 
unqualified, he will not be permitted to register agam. 

3. A major shall consist of not more than 42 semester hours In a department. 

4. Every candidate for a degree must take a comprehensive examination in his 
major subject. To be eligible for the comprehensive examination, he must have 
maintained at least a C average in his major courses. A student may not take a 
comprehensive examination unless he has been accepted as a major in the department 
not later than the beginning of the semester previous to the semester In which he 
takes the comprehensive examination. 

III. Credit by Examination 

I. College credit may be granted on the basis of the College Entrance Examination 
Board Advanted Placement Tests subject to the following conditions: 

(a) A grade of 3 or better is required. 

(b) Credit Is awarded at the discretion of the chairman of the department con- 
cerned after examination of the test and paper and consultation with the Dean 
of the College and /or the Degrees Committee. 

(c) Credit granted in a foreign language may not exceed six semester hours; credit 
may not be awarded in a foreign student's native language. 

(d) Credit In non-language courses may be granted In the course tested only if it 
is recognized by The University of the South. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 57 

IV. Degrees With Honors 

A student who has fulfilled the degree requirements with a general grade point 
average of 3.75 and honors on his comprehensive examinations will receive his degree 
Summa Cum Laude. A student with a general grade point average of 3.5 and honors 
on his comprehensive examinations will receive his degree Magna Cum Laude. A 
student with a grade-point average of 3.0, with or without honors on his comprehensive 
examinations, will receive his degree Cum Laude. 



ENGINEERING 

There has been concern among our nation's educators and industrial 
leaders over the limited number of courses provided in liberal arts in 
the four-year curriculum offered by technical schools to students in 
various branches of engineering. 

With the hope of broadening the engineering student's outlook and 
educational background, The University of the South has entered 
into agreement with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Columbia Uni- 
versity, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Nqw York University 
for the cooperative education of students in engineering. Under these 
plans the student will attend The University of the South for three 
years, during which time he will take courses in the humanities and 
the social sciences while obtaining an adequate foundation in mathe- 
matics, physics, and chemiistry. At the end of his third year at 
Sewanee, if he has met the course requirements and has maintained a 
satisfactory overall average, he will transfer to the engineering school 
of his choice, where he will concentrate in his chosen field of engineer- 
ing for two years. 

At the end of the combined five-year course, the student will receive 
from Sewanee the degree of Bachelor of Arts while at the same time 
receiving an appropriate degree in engineering from the engineering 
school. 

Since Rensselaer, Georgia Institute of Technology, and New York 
University also have Air Force ROTC programs, the student may con- 
tinue participation in the ROTC unit at these institutions and receive 
his commission as a Second Lieutenant in the Air Force at the same 
time that he receives the two degrees. 

A student who wishes to follow the Combined Engineering Plan 



S8 



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 



should state his intention before registering for his freshman year at 
Sewanee and should select the following schedule: 



First Yeab 
English 1 01- 1 02 
History 101-102 
French or German 
Mathematics 103-104 
Physics 101-102 
(Aerospace Studies 
101-102) 



Second Year 
English 201-202 
Chemistry 101-102 
French or German 
Mathematics 201-202 
Advanced Physics 
(Aerospace Studies 
201-202) 



Third Year 
Economics or Pol, Science 
Philosophy or Religion 
French or German 
Mechanics 
Engineering Drawing and 

Descriptive Geometry 
Elective 
(Aerospace Studies 

301-302) 

Students preparing for Chemical Engineering will take two or three 
years of Chemistry and one or two years of Physics. 

PRE-MEDICAL CURRICULUM 

A student who plans to enter medical school will have opportunities 
to consult with the Faculty Pre-Medical Advisory Committee from 
the beginning of his Freshman year. The Committee has drawn up 
several different curricula providing for a major in Biology, in Chem- 
istry, or in other fields. Each student will be advised according to his 
individual aptitude and need. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 59 

SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION 



AEROSPACE STUDIES 

Professor Howell, Major, USAF 
Assistant Professor Kepley, Capt., USAF 
Assistant Professor Murphy, Capt., USAF 

General Information: 

The Department of Aerospace Studies is the academic department 
established by the University and the United States Air Force to teach 
the courses prescribed by the Air Force Reserve Officers Training 
Corps. 

The basic purpose of the department is to produce officers of ap- 
propriate quahty to satisfy stated Air Force Officer requirements. This 
purpose is achieved by providing those students who desire to serve in 
the Air Force appropriate precommissioning education and training to 
qualify them for commissions as second lieutenants and active duty 
as junior officers. All Aerospace Studies courses give full credit as 
elective subjects toward degree requirements. 

The chairman of the department is an Air Force Officer who is desig- 
nated by the University, in coordination with the United States Air 
Force, as Professor of Aerospace Studies. He is also Commander of 
the Air Force ROTC detachment. The officers and airmen on his staff 
are members of the United States Air Force. 

The Air Force ROTC provides a four-year aerospace studies cur- 
riculum divided into two specific areas: la two-year "General Military 
Course" (Freshman and Sophomore years) and a two-year "Pro- 
fessional Officer Course" (Junior and Senior years). 

There are four options available to students who are interested in 
the Aerospace Studies curriculum. 

(i) A two-year financial assistance program leading to a commis- 
sion. Scholarship grants under this program may include all 
tuition, fees, and books plus a fifty-dollar per month retainer fee 
for the two years. These scholarships are limited in number and 
are offered on a competitive basis only to those students enrolled 
in the four-year program. 

(2) A four-year program leading to a commission which does not 
provide full financial assistance but does provide a forty-dollar 



6o THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

per month retainer fee during the Junior and Senior years. 

(3) A two-year program leading to a commission. Students par- 
ticipating in this program attend a concentrated six-week Field 
Training Course at an air force base duiring the summer be- 
tween their Sophomore and Junior years. Satisfactory comple- 
tion of this course equips them academically and militarily to 
enroll in the last two years of the Aerospace Studies curriculum 
for the purpose of achieving a commission. This program pays 
them approximately ^120 for the six-week Field Training Course- 
plus the forty-dollar per month retainer fee during the Juinior 
and Senior years. 

(4) A two-year program of general military education for those 
Freshmen and Sophomores who do not desire a commission but 
who would like to include in their academic background some 
knowledge of the relationship of military power to the issues 
underlying international tensions, and some practical training 
in basic leadership. Juniors and Seniors in this category may 
enroll in the professional officer courses as special students who 
are taking the courses for academic credit only. 

Entrance Examination: 

All students applying for the four-year program must pass a written 
aptitude test prior to registration. This test will be administered during 
Freshman Orientation. 

Physical Examinations: 

In addition to the examination required by the College, prospective 
members of the four-year program will be required to file a report of 
physical examination with the Department of Aerospace Studies. The 
report must be made on Air Force forms which will be mailed to all 
new freshmen prior to registration. 

Summer Training Unit: 

The Professional Officer Course (Junior and Senior years) includes 
a four-week Summe'r Training Unit at an air force base. Cadets 
pursuing a four-year commissioning program attend this training unit 
during the summer between their Junior and Senior years or immedi- 
ately following graduation. They are paid approximately $88 during 
the summer training period. 

Deferment from Selective Service Induction: 

National Selective Service laws provide a quota to the Air Force 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 6l 

ROTC for deferment of cadets from induction into the armed services. 
Freshman and Sophomore cadets who are not participants in the fi- 
nancial assistance program may be selected for deferment within this 
quota on the basis of their relative standing with other cadets based on 
academic grades and military qualifications. 

Enlistment in the Air Force Reserve: 

Those cadets who are receiving scholarship grants under the financial 
assistance program and those Juniors and Seniors who are recipients 
of the forty-dollar per month retainer fee are required to be 
members of the Air Force enlisted reserve. They are not subject to 
call to active duty while in cadet status. Upon being commissioned, 
they enter the Air Force for a four-year tour of active duty if they are 
non-flying officers and for a five-year tour if they are flying officers. 
Cadets enlisted in the reserve who are not able to complete the Aero- 
space Studies program because of reasons beyond their control, such as 
academic, financial, or physical inability, will be discharged from the 
reserve simultaneously with their disenrollment from the Air Force 
ROTC. 

Flying and Flying Training: 

Freshman and Sophomore cadets are usually offered at least one op- 
portunity to participate in an orientation flight to an air force base. 
Those cadets who are members of the enlisted reserve are authorized 
to travel via air force aircraft on a space-available basis. Cadets who 
are qualified for air force pilot training receive 36^ hours of flight 
training during their Senior year. This training may culminate in a 
private pilot's Hcense. 

Books and Uniforms: 

Aerospace Studies textbooks and air force uniforms are furnished 
free to all cadets. Initial uniform alterations are at government ex- 
pense. Any of these furnished items which are lost or damaged are 
charged to the cadet. 

General Military Course 
(Freshman and Sophomore Years) 

101. Corps Training. 

One hour. (Credit, one hour). 

102. World Military Systems. 

An introductory course exploring the causes of present international tensions and 



62 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

the relationship of military power in general and national aerospace forces in particular 
to those tensions. Lectures, two hours; Corps Training, one hour. (Credit, two hours). 

201. World Military Systems. 

Continued study of world military forces, and the political-military issues surround- 
ing the existence of these forces. Special emphasis on forces established by regional 
treaty such as NATO, CENTO, SEATO, and the Warsaw Pact and on the future 
trends and implications of world aerospace power. Lectures, two hours; Corps 
Trainmg, one hour. (Credit, two hours). 

202. Corps Training. 

One hour. (Credit, one hour). 

Professional Officer Course 
(Junior and Senior Years) 

301-302. Growth and Development of Aerospace Power. 

A two-semester study of the nature of war; development of aerospace power m the 
United States; mission and organization of the Defense Department; Air Force con- 
cepts, doctrine, and employment; astronautics and space operations, and the future 
development of aerospace power. Includes the United States space programs, vehicles, 
systems, and problems in space exploration. Three class hours per week, and one 
hour of corps training. (Credit, three hours each semester). 

401-402. The Professional Officer. 

A two-seme5?ter study of professionalism, leadership, and management. Includes the 
meaning of professionalism, professional responsibilities, the military justice system, 
leadership theory, functions and practices, management principles and functions, 
problem solving, and management tools, practices, and controls. Three class hours 
per week and one hour of corps traming. (Credit, three hours each semester). 



BIOLOGY 

Professor Owen 

Professor Yeatman 

Associate Professor Foreman 

Assistant Professor Ramseur 

The Department of Biology requires 28 semester hours plus a mini- 
mum of 2 semester hours of Seminar for a major. Additional require- 
ments are: i year of Chemistry; i year of Physics; i year of Calcu- 
lus. The foreign language requirement for the B.A. degree may 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 63 

be satisfied by completing 3 years of German or 3 years of French, but 
it is recommended that a student have two year-courses in each of 
these languages. 

For a first-year student who plans to major in Biology, the following 
curriculum is recommended: 

Chemistry 101-102 History 101-102 

Mathematics 101-151 English 101-102 

German or French 1 01-102 AFROTC or Physical Education 

Biology 101-102 Is prerequisite for all other courses in Biology. 

For a major in Biology a student must take the following courses 
in addition to those courses which are required for the degree: Bi- 
ology 201-203, Biology 205 or 206, Biology 301 and Biology 320 or 321. 

101-102. Principles of Biology. 

Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours per semester). 
Staff. 

201-203. Developmental Anatomy. 

Lectures, two hours; laboratory, four hours. (Credit, four hours per semester). 
Mr. Yeatman. 

202. Invertebrate Zoology. 

Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Yeatman. 

205. Systematic Botany. 

Lectures, two hours; laboratory, four hours. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Ramseur. 

206. Ecology. 

Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Ramseur. 

301. Genetics. 

Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Owen. 

303. Evolution. 

Lectures, one hour; tutorial, two hours. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Owen. 

307-308 and 309-310. Biology Seminar. 

Required of Biology majors. (Credit, one hour each semester). Staff. 

316. Philosophy of Science. 

Lectures, one hour. (Credit, one hour). Mr. McCrady. 

320. Vertebrate Physiology. 

Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Foreman. 



64 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

321. Cell Biology. 

Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Foreman. 

401-402. Senior Tutorial; Honors. 

(Credit, one or two hours). Sltaff. 

411. Radioisotopes. 

Lectures, two hours; laboratory, four hours. (Credit, four hours). Mr. Owen. 



CHEMISTRY 

Professor Camp 

Associate Professor Guenther 

^Associate Professor Dorn 

Assistant Professor Lowe 

Sewanee Is one of the few small liberal arts colleges that offer an 
undergraduate program In chemistry that is approved by the Commit- 
tee on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society. All 
students who plan to become professional chemists are advised to com- 
plete this program, In addition to the minimum requirements for a de- 
partmental miajor. Such students should discuss their curriculum plans 
with the chemistry staff during their first year in college. 

Minimum Major Requirements: Chemistry 101-102, 203-204, 211- 
212, 303-304, 405, 409-410; Mathematics 201-202; Physics 101-102. 

Every Chemistry major must take a preHminary comprehensive ex- 
amination at the beginning of the fall semester of his senior year. The 
purpose of this Is to help the student become aware of topics upon 
which he should concentrate in preparing for his comprehensive ex- 
amination. This preliminary comprehensive must be taken before the 
end of the second week in the semester. It will Include material in the 
history of science. 

Requirements for a degree approved by The American Chemical 
Society (In addition to minimum requirements listed above): (i) both 
French 201-202 and German 201-202; (2) two semesters of either 
mathematics beyond Mathematics 202 or physics beyond Physics 102; 
Chemistry 401, 403, and 404. 

French or German Is the foreign language that a prospective chemis- 
try major should take his Freshman year. 



*0n leave 1965-66. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 65 

Chemistry 101-102 is a prerequisite for all other courses in chemistry. 

101-102. General Chemistry. 

An elementary study of the composition and structure of matter. Relationship 
and distinction between experimental data and theoretical concepts are stressed. The 
systematic qualitative analysis of morganic material by the semimlcro method is 
studied In the laboratory during the second semester. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, 
three hours. (Credit, four hours each semester). Staff. 

203-204. Organic Chemistry, 

A study of the nomenclature and the properties of the most Important classes of 
organic compounds and the use of electronic concepts of molecular structure and 
chemltal bonding. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four 
hours each semester). Mr. Lowe. 

211-212. Quantitative Chemistry. 

This is a study of quantitative chemical measurements, their interpretation, and the 
chemical equilibria involved. It combines some material from classical quantitative 
analysis with the physical chemistry needed to understand it. The mathematics of 
multiple complex equilibria is developed in detail. The relations of the free energy 
change to equilibrium and cell potential are stressed, and many equilibrium constants 
are determmed by analysis in the laboratory. Two years of chemistry, and a knowl- 
edge of elementary physics and talculus are assumed. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, 
six hours. (Credit, four hours each semester). Mr. Guenther. 

303-304. Physical Chemistry. 

First semester: Thermodynamic and kinetic interpretation of some properties of 
matter. Second semester: Electrochemistry, atomic and molecular structure, reaction 
kinetics. Prerequisites: Chemistry 212, Mathematics 201-202, Physics 101-102. 
Permission may be given to exceptional students to take the course without all the 
prerequisites. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours 
each semester). Mr. Guenther. 

401. Qualitative Organic Analysis. 

The purification and identification of organic compounds, together with problem 
solving and the use of the library in work related to the laboratory assignments. 
Conference, one hour; laboratory, six hours. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Camp. 

402. Advanced Organic Chemistry. 

An intensive study of a few selected topics in organic chemistry. (Credit, two 
hours). Given 1965-1966 and alternate years. Mr. Camp. 

403. Inorganic Chemistry. 

Application of concepts of electronic configuration to interpretation of physical 
and chemical properties of inorganic materials. Emphasis is given to spectra and 
crystal field theory of transition metal compounds. Prerequisite: Chemistry 303-304. 
Lettures, two hours; laboratory, three hours. Laboratory option by permission. 
(Credit, two or three hours). Mr. Guenther. 



n 



66 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

404. Advanced Laboratory. 

Laboratory problems In a field of special interest to the student. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 303-304. (Credit, two to four hours). Staff. 

405. History of Science. 

A reading course required of all Chemistry majors. After consultation with a 
member of the Chemistry faculty, the student must (not later than April 30 of his 
junior year) submit a bibliography of references he plans to use and an outline of 
subject matter to be read. An outline of material studied must be handed In before 
the prelimmary comprehensive examination, and a written and oral final examination 
taken not later than the first week following the Christmas holidays. (Credit, one 
hour). Staff. 

409-410. Seminar and Honors Course. 

Open to majors; all seniors must participate in the weekly seminar for one hour 
credit per semester. Additional work may be elected In a research project with one 
of the staff. Credit to be determined by the staff. 

41L Radioisotope Techniques and Chemical Instrumentation. 

Given in cooperation with the Department of Biology. The major part of this 
course is devoted to a study of the applications of radioisotopes to chemical problems. 
During the latter third of the course, the principles and applications of selected 
chemical instruments are studied. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three hours. 
(Credit, four hours). Mr. Dorn. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING j 

Professor Cheston 

101, Engineering Drawing. 

The use of drafting Instruments, and Introductory work in freehand lettermg; 
the principles of orthographic projection, of dimensioning, of Isometric projection, of | 
oblique projections, and of perspective. Lectures, one hour; laboratory, two hours. 
(Credit, two hours). 

102. Plane Surveying. I 

The use of surveying instruments; plane-table surveying and mapping; use of ! 
the level and of telescopic alidade; transit surveying, and mapping from a transit i 
survey; topographic mapping. Lectures, two hours; laboratory and field work, six 
hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 103-104 and Civil Engineermg loi. (Credit, 
four hours). 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES d*] 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

^Professor Turlington 

Professor J. H. W. Rhys 

fMR. Binnicker 

Mr. Carleton 

The departmental requirements for a major in Classical Languages 
will be arranged in consultation with the Department Head. Students 
contemplating such a major are advised that this University is a con- 
tributing member of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens 
and of the American Academy In Rome. 

A student accepted as a m^ajor in this Department will, at the end of 
his Sophomore year, be assigned a list of books and articles, including 
ancient authors and modern works bearing on the languages, litera- 
tures, and civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome. Part of the 
comprehensive examination will be based on these. 

Of the courses listed below, Greek 101-102, 201-202 and Latin loi- 
102, 201-202 are offered every year. All other courses are offered ap- 
proximately every alternate year. 

Classical Studies 

No knowledge of Greek or Latin Is required for the following six 
courses. None of them can be used to satisfy any part of the foreign 
language requirement. 

101. Classical Mythology. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Caileton. 

104. Our Classical Heritage. 

Greek and Roman ideals and Institutions which have mfluence and continue to be 
basic m contemporary American civilization. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Turlington. 

201. Classical Etymology In English. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Turlington. 

204. Classical Literature In Translation. 

Selections from Greek and Latin literature in English translation. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Carleton. 

206. Greek Athletics. 

Athletics in Homer, the Olympic and other games of the Greeks, their gymnastics, 



*0n leave second semester 1965- 1966. 
tSecond semester, 1965-1966. 



n 



68 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH ! 

i 

their concept of athletics, and its place in Greek education. One hour of lecture 

and one hour of laboratory each week. In addition to the cedit given for this course, ;i 

attendance at both lecture and laboratory can be used to satisfy the two weekly ji 

periods required for credit in Physical Education. (Credit, one hour). Mr. Turlington. * 

207. Classical Archaeology. '* 

A study of selected sites of importance in the life and culture of classical antiquity, I 
preceded by a review of four p re-classical tivilizations, including the Trojan, Cretan, 

and Mycenaean. Discussion is supplemented by use of slides and artifacts. (Credit, i 
three hours). Mr. Rhys. 



Greek 

101-102. Beginning Greek. 

(Credit, six hours). Mr. Carleton. 

201-202. Plato's Socratic Dialogues. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 

301-302. Homer. 

(Credit, three hours eath semester). Staff. 

303-304. Greek Historians. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 

305-306. Greek Lyric Poets. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Carleton. 

307-308. Greek Orators. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Rhys. 

311. Greek Prose Composition. 

Required of concentrators m Greek; open to other qualified students. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Turlington. 

401-402. Greek Tragedy. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

403. Greek Comedy. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Rhys. 

411-412. Introduction to Linguistics. 

Required of majors in Greek; open to other students accepted by the instructor. 
(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 



Latin 



101-102. Beginning Latin. 

(Credit, SIX hours). Mr. Turlington. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 69 

201. Cicero. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Carleton. 

202. Virgil. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Carleton. 

301-302. Latin Historians. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlmgton. 

303-304. The Lyric Poets. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

305. Elegiac Poets. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Binnicker. 

306. Roman Satire. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Carleton. 

311. Latin Prose Composition. 

Required of concentrators in Latin; open to other qualified students. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Carleton. 

401-402. Roman Drama. 

(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 

404. Orations o^ Cicero. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Turlington. 

405. Medieval Latin. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Carleton. 

406. Ecclesiastical Latin, 

(Credit, two hours). Mr. Carleton. 

411-412. Introduction to Linguistics. 

Required of majors m Latin; open to other students accepted by the Instructor. 
^Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Turlington. 



70 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

ECONOMICS 

Professor Degen 

Professor Thorogood 

Associate Professor Goodstein 

Lecturer: *Mr. Vaughan 

This Department seeks to provide instruction for students interested 
in understanding our economic society: its background and funda- 
mental principles, its problems and trends, its public and private eco- 
nomic institutions. 

Students majoring in this Department are usually preparing for ca- 
reers in business, law, teaching, or government. Many continue on 
to graduate schools in either economics or business administration, or 
in specialized fields such as international relations or industrial rela- 
tions. Those preparing for graduate work in economics or business 
administration are advised to study mathematics beyond the prescribed 
year course and to have some knowledge of calculus. Freshmen 
and Sophomores who expect to major in Economics are urged to con- 
sult the Chairman of the Department as soon as practicable for the 
purpose of planning a desirable course sequence. 

A minimum of ii semester courses, or 33 semester hours, exclusive of 
Business Law, is normally required of a major in this Department. 
Four courses are prescribed for all majors: Economics loi, 305, 401, 
and either 301 or 306. Other courses are recommended on the basis 
of the student's individual interests and future plans. Economics 10 1 
is normally prerequisite to all other courses, but in exceptional cases, 
with the permission of the Chairman, other courses may be taken 
concurrently. 

All majors in this Department are required to pass a written com- 
prehensive examination. In addition to the written comprehensive ex- 
amination, an oral examination will be given to candidates for honors 
in Economics. 

Students may satisfy the social science degree requirement by taking 
Economics 10 1 plus one 300 level course in Economics, or by taking 
Economics loi and a semester of Political Science. 

101. Introduction to Economics. 

Essential concepts for understanding modem economic activity and economic issues 
involving public policy. (Credit, three hours). Staff. 



•First semester, 1965-1966. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES *J1 

211. Elementary Statistics. 

An introduction to the theory and procedures pertaining to the reduction of data, 
statistical inference, the association of variables, index numbers, and time series. 
(Credit, three hours). StaflF. 

212. Fundamentals of Accounting. 

The conceptual nature and general procedures of business a'ccounting; transactions, 
accounts, the balance sheet, and the income statement; the accounting cycle. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Vaughan. 

213. Business Law. 

The main principles of business law: contracts, baiknents, negotiable instruments, 
common carriers, insurance, sales, wills, nature of legal remedies. How and when to 
seek legal advice. Also listed as Political Science 213. (Credit, three hours). Mr. 
Lancaster. 

301. Money and Banking. 

Historical and analytical study of the American monetary and banking system, with 
particular attention to monetary standards, commercial banking, the Federal Reserve 
System, and monetary theory. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Degen. 

304. Labor Economics. 

History of the American labor movement; labor-management relations; the labor 
market; the problem of unemployment; governmental policies and laws affecting 
labor. Current Issues are emphasized. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Degen. 

305. Microeconomic Theory. 

The study of consumer, firm, and industry behavior and the conditions of equilibrium 
in output and Input markets and in the economy as a whole. (Credit, three hours).. 
Mr. Goodsteln. 

306. Macroeconomic Theory. 

The study of economic growth, employment, and the price level. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Goodsteln. 

321. American Economic History: The Character of Economic Growth. 

An historical study of how American economic growth has occurred in terms of the 
prdcesses, institutions, and Ideas involved. Coverage extends from colonial times to 
the present. Also listed as History 321. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Goodsteln. 

322. American Economic History: The Problems of Econamic Growth. 

An historical study of the economic problems that have emerged as America has 
grown, and their causes. Considerable attention is paid to the history of government 
policy. Also listed as History 322. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Goodsteln. 

331. Public Finance and Taxation. 

Federal, state, and local tax systems in the United States. Purposes and effects 



72 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

of governmental expenditures. Budgets, debts, fiscal policy. Problems In mcome, 
^corporate, estate, and property taxation. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Thorogood. 

332. Business Organization and Finance. 

Study of business organizations, especially the corporation, from the viewpoint of 
management. Investors, and public. Problems of promotion, financing, expansion. 
Failure and reorganization. Stock markets; investment banking; security regulation. 
Investment principles. Cooperatives and government-owned corporations. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Thorogood. 

337. Intemattonal Economics. 

Historical, institutional, and theoretical study of International trade, finance, and 
the role of government in international economic relations. The position of the United 
States In the world economy is examined. International economic institutions, such 
as the International Monetary Fund, are analyzed. (Credit, three hours). Mr. 
Degen. 

340. Introduction to Mathematical Economics. 

The mathematical formulation of e!conomic theory and a study of selected topics 
in economics drawn from among linear programming, input-output analysis, general 
equilibrium analysis, growth models, and econometrics. (Credit, three hours). 

401. History of Economic Thought. 

A study of the principal schools of economic thought and their development and 
inter-relationship. Medieval, Mercantlllstic, Physlocratic, Classical, Utopian, Socialist, 
Neo-classical, and Keyneslan Schools; a brief consideration of other miscellaneous 
schools of thought. Emphasis on Adam Smith, Ricardo, Malthus, J. S. Mill, Marx, 
Marshall, and Keynes. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Thorogood. 

402. Regional Economics. 

A study of regional economic processes from the local to the multi-state level. 
Emphasis is on economic theory, but some attention Is also paid to the problems of 
particular regions. Permission of the instructor required. (Credit, three hours). Mr. 
Goodstein. 

404. Seminar in Economic Development. 

A study of the revolutionary changes taking place In the underdeveloped areas of the 
world. Considers theories, policies, and problems of accelerating economic growth 
in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Economic, historical, political, and social factors 
are covered. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Degen. 

450-451. Tutorials. 

Advanced work for selected students. Three hours credit for a tutorial in a given 
area of study. Staff. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 73 

ENGLISH 

Professor Harrison 

Professor Moore 

Professor Martin 

Professor Rhys 

Associate Professor Ramsey 

Mr. Arnold 

Mr. Corbin 

Lecturer: Mr. Lytle 

English I0I-I02 is required for the College degree. 

A student majoring in English will be required to take English 321- 
322 and EngHsh 421-422. The comprehensive examination is divided 
into seven fields. To qualify for graduation, an English major must 
take the examination in five fields, one of the five to be Shakespeare. 

At the beginning of his eighth semester, an English major with an 
average of B or better may declare himself a candidate for honors. He 
will be registered for English 452, will be assigned to a tutor, and will 
write an honors essay under the direction of his tutor. A candidate for 
honors will take a one-hour oral examination in addition to the written 
examination. 

Unless otherwise indicated, all courses meet three hours a week and 
give three hours credit each semester. 

101-102. Introduction to English Literature. 

First semester: several plays by Shakespeare. Second semester: Chaucer, Milton, 
Keats, one or more modern poets, and a novel. Themes both semesters. Staff. 

201-202. Representative Masterpieces. 

European literature in translation. First semester: The Iliad, The Odyssey, Greek 
plays, Lucretius. Second semester: The Divine Comedy, Faust, Crime and Punishment. 
Staff. 

211-212. Modern Dramatic Literature. Mr. Rhys. 

301-302. Shakespeare. Mr. Harrison. 

303-304. Romantic Literature. Mr. Martin. 

305-306. Victorian Literature. Mr. Martin. 

307-308. Contemporary Literature. 

First semester: Contemporary Fiction. Mr. Lytle. Second semester: Con- 
temporary Poetry. Mr. Corbin. 



74 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

309-310. American Literature. Mr. Moore. 

311-312. Medieval English Literature. Mr. Rhys. 

313-314. The Renaissance. Mr. Arnold. 

315-316. Restoration and Eighteenth Century. Mr. Ramsey. 

321-322. First semester: Study of Poetry. Mr. Ramsey. Second semester: History 
of English. Mr. Harrison. (Credit, one hour each semester). 

401-402. Seminar: English Literary Criticism. Mr. Harrison. 

403-404. Seminar: The Novel. Mr. Moore. 

405-406. Seminar: Introduction to the Drama. Mr. Rhys. 

407-408.| Seminar: Advanced Writing. Mr. Lytle. 

409-410. Seminar: Verse Writing and Poetics. Mr. Ramsey. 

421-422. Survey of English Literature. 

Survey of English Literature. (Credit, one hour each semester). Mr. Harrison 
and Mr. Ramsey. 

452. Honors Tutorial. (Second semester). 



FINE ARTS 
Mr. Barrett 

For students who are interested in Art but who intend to major in 
other fields, as well as for those who intend to major in Art, the De- 
partment of Fine Arts offers integrated programs which provide a broad 
background in Art History, Theory, Criticism, and Creative Skills. 

These courses, being related to the other Humanities and to the 
issues of contemporary living, will enable students, especially those who 
do not intend to major in Art, to enlarge their awareness of the visual 
arts and to develop an understanding of Art and Architecture. At 
least one studio workshop course is recommended to give students an 
opportunity to become acquainted with the basic creative principles of 
the visual arts. Such an experience in acquiring a basic skill can be- 
come the foundation for constructive hobbies throughout the remainder 
of their lives. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 75 

The Gallery of Fine Arts located in Guerry Hall features the Clai- 
borne-Armstrong Collection of furniture, paintings, art objects, and 
sculpture. Other selected representative examples of art from the 
permanent collection of the University are also on constant display. 
Periodically, there are displays of works by contemporary artists. 
Hours: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday from 2:00 to 
5:00 p.m. Other hours by appointment. 

For students who wish to major in Art, a comprehensive approach 
is emphasized and a minimum of 30 semester hours is required. Techni- 
cal skill in creative expression is developed through studio workshop 
courses in Freehand Drawing, Painting, Two- and Three-Dimensional 
Design, and Color. Varieties of media and materials are used to explore 
basic creative ideas and experiences. For every six hours of studio 
workshop, at least three hours of History or Theory are recommended. 
By stating his preference for practical or theoretical art activities, the 
majoring student may concentrate his efforts either in the Studio Work- 
shop or in the History and Theory courses. If the student chooses to 
specialize in History and Theory, he should take three hours of studio 
workshop for every six hours of History and Theory. In consultation 
with the Chairman of the Department, pertinent related courses from 
other departments will be chosen to complete his program. 

The work of the Department of Fine Arts is essentially non-voca- 
tional, but it does furnish a solid foundation for further study and work 
in both lart history and professional art careers. One of the depart- 
ment's major objectives is to help the student discover relationships 
in all phases of his experiences in the Arts and Humanities. Thus he 
will develop and enlarge his awareness of the importance of independent 
insight, judgment, and understanding of worthy values. 

Unless otherwise indicated, all courses meet three hours a week and 
give three hours credit each semester. 

101-102. Art Appreciation. 

This course includes analysis and art techniques which can open exciting fields for 
further exploration and study of the structural and aesthetic principles of pictorial 
composition and design and their relationship to the other arts and humanities in 
contemporary society. loi. Explores Painting, the Graphic Arts, and Commercial 
Art Layout. 102. A continuation of lOi and explores Architecture, Sculpture, 
Industrial Design, and the Minor Arts. 

Courses in Western Art History and Theory 

A history of architecture, sculpture, painting, and the mmor arts, including analysis 
of the elements and prmclples of art forms, supplemented by examples from the de- 



76 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

partmental collection of slides and periodic exhibitions of contemporary professional 
art work m the University's Gallery of Fine Arts in Guerry Hall. 

103. From Prehistoric to Aegean Art. 

First Semester 1 966-1 967 and every three years. 

104. Classical Art. 

The ancient art of Greece and Rome. Second semester 1966-1967 and every three 
years. 

201. Medieval Art. 

From Early Christian to Gothic Art. First Semester 1968-1969 and every three 
years. 

202. The Italian Renaissance. 

From Trecento to Cinquecento. Second Semester 1968-1969, and every three years. 

301. From the XVII Century to Impressionism. 

First Semester 1968-1969 and every three years. 

302. Modern Art. 

Second Semester 1968-1969 and every three years. 

Studio Workshop Courses 

By selecting and using what seems best from various sources, these workshop courses 
are designed to guide the student in acquirmg basic artistically creative skills and 
experiences necessary in developing his art ideas, abilities, and understanding from 
merely curious interest to adequate personal expression in various art media. The 
art major should take a minimum of six studio workshop hours and three hours of 
History-Theory per week each semester for a mmimum of six semesters. 

155-156. Freehand Drawing. 

A beginning course in seeing, understanding, and drawing realistically simple still- 
life objects and casts, portraits, landscapes, and figure sketches in pencil, charcoal, pen 
and ink, and pastels. The fundamentals of freehand perspective and elementary pic- 
torial composition are studied. Each tlass problem is used as a point of departure for 
more creative design experiments. 

159. Experiments In Color. (Repeated each semester). 

These experiments enable a student to develop an easy familiarity with, and an 
understanding of, color and how to use it. The course consists of an analysis of 
color theories through a series of experunents using different media and tools. Al- 
though it supplements other related design and painting courses, no previous experience 
in art is necessary. 

161-162. Painting. 

The techniques of oil, water color, tempera, pastels, and polymerplastic media are 
explored through still life, portrait, and landscape assignments. The student learns how 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 'J^ 

these problems of pamting differ from those of drawmg. At the same time he de- 
velops his own ability to express himself in terms of the limitations of the medium 
with which he chooses to work. 

251-252. Three-Dimenslonal Design. 

Basic three-dimensional contepts of form and space relationships, structural funda- 
mentals, and chance forms are analyzed and graphically expressed. This course is 
also an introduction to Architectural Design, Industrial Design, Interior Design, and 
Sculpture. 

253-254. Advanced Freehand Drawmg. 

(Prerequisite 155-156). 

257-258. Advanced Painting. 
(Prerequisite 161-162). 

259-260. Advanced Three-Dimenslonal Design. 

(Prerequisite 251-252 and Engineering Drawing loi). 

An Evening Community Art Class 

This class is open to all interested members of the community and faculty. There 
is a charge of $10.00 for each person enrolled eath semester. The class meets for 
three hours one evening per week (there are approximately 14 or 15 meetmgs) per 
semester. A limited number of interested University students may enter at any time 
at no charge. This is a non-credit course, and no previous art experience is necessary. 



FORESTRY 

Professor Cheston 
Associate Professor Smith 
Associate Professor Baird 

Research Center Lecturers 
Mr. Mignery 
Mr. Burton 
Mr. Russell 
Mr. Smalley 

The four-year course of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Forestry is designed to provide the student with a thorough 
background in general education. Sufficient forestry training is given 



78 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

the Student to enable him to enter the field of forestry or to do grad- 
uate work. Generous amounts of field and laboratory work are In- 
cluded in the curriculum. 

The forest land of the University, of over 8,000 contiguous acres. Is 
managed on a multiple-use basis for continuous hardwood production. 
Forestry students share in the problems encountered in a modern forest 
management program, and work out problems of forest land manage- 
ment. 

Two forest areas owned and managed by the University but not 
adjacent to the major land area contain 900 and 60 acres respectively. 
A modern reforestation program has been undertaken in cooperation 
with Bowaters Southern Paper Corporation on the 900-acre tract. Al- 
most a million carefully selected trees will be planted. The 60-acre Bell 
experimental tract will be partly covered with water when the new Tims 
Ford Lake is filled. This area, mostly old field plantation, will be 
available for recreation and study of forest growth on old farmlands. 

Complete utilization equipment is provided by a. sawmill, a dry kiln, 
and a remanufacturing plant including a moulder. Students see first- 
hand demonstrations and take part in logging, milling, drying, and 
manufacture of lumber. The Forestry Department operates these fa- 
cilities for their educational value and for the benefit of the University. 

The Snowden Forestry Building and attached greenhouse, contain- 
ing 10,000 square feet of floor space, was constructed in 1963. All 
rooms are paneled in wood donated by lumbermen and friends of Se- 
wanee. Classrooms and laboratories are modern and provide an 
atmosphere especially conducive to the study of forestry. Of special 
Interest in the display cases is the Lou Williams gavel collection; Mr. 
Williams of Chattanooga personally collected the woods from all over 
the world and made the gavels. The Nickey wood collection of 8,800 
different wood samples is unique and classified and maintained in ma- 
hogany filing oabinets in its own room. It presents an unusual oppor- 
tunity for the wood technician to study exotic woods. 

Two curricula are suggested for students majoring in Forestry. One 
Is designed to prepare the student for a professional career immediately 
upon completing the requirements for the B.S. In Forestry degree. 
The other is intended to prepare the student for graduate work in a 
specialized field of Forestry. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



79 



Terminal Curriculum 
Freshman Yeae 
English 1 01-102 
History 101-102 
Language 101-102 (201-202) 
Mathematics 101-104 
Biology 101-102 
Aerospace Studies or Physical Education 



Junior Year 

Forestry 305-306 
Forestry 303-304 
Forestry 301 
Forestry 302 
Economics 212 
Electives 



Sophomore Year 

Language 201-202 

Economics loi 

Civil Engineering 101-102 

Forestry loi 

Political Science 213 or Economics 213 

Political Science loi 

Religion or Philosophy 

Aerospace Studies or Physical Education 

Senior Year 
Forestry 401-402 
Forestry 405 
Forestry 201-202 
Forestry Research 
Electives 



Graduate School Preparation* 



Junior Year 
Economics 211 
Forestry 305-306 
Forestry 303-304 
Sophomore Biology 
Electives 



Sophomore Year 

Chemistry 1 01-102 

Forestry 10 1 

Language 201-202 

Mathematics 201-202 

Economics loi 

Philosophy or Religion 

Aerospace Studies or Physical Education 

Senior Year 
Economics 305 
Forestry 401-402 
Forestry 405 
Civil Engineering 
Forestry Research 
Political Science 
Electives 



During the spring recess of the Senior year, each Forestry student is 
required to perform intensive field work and prepare a written report. 
One hour's credit will be granted for this work. The cost of board and 
room for this period will be the concern of each student. The location 
of the forested area to be worked on may vary according to the needs 
of the students. 

During the last semester of their Senior year, Forestry students will 



*Freshman year as for Terminal Curriculum. 



80 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

accompany an instructor on a field trip to visit various forestry enter- 
prises of regional significance in the area surrounding Sewanee. Stu- 
dents on this trip will ordinarily visit lumbering operation's, national 
forests, and other points of particular significance to them. 

Special equipment needed by the Forestry student during his course 
of study includes drawing instruments, triangles, scales, protractor, 
hand compass, clipboard, cruising axe, hand lens, wedge prism, and 
field clothes. 

Each Forestry major is required to spend summers engaged in 
practical forestry work in lieu of the common forestry school summer 
camp. This requirement may be replaced by formal training at 
any recognized forestry school summer camp. Practical summer work 
for the Forestry requirement can be satisfied by work with the Forest 
Service or at forest products industrial establishments. The Forestry 
Department will help students obtain necessary practical summer 
work. These are all salaried positions. 

U. S. Forest Service Research Project 

The Sewanee Research Project, operated by the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, and one of several branches of the Forest Service's South- 
ern Forest Experiment Station, in New Orleans, Louisiana, works in 
close cooperation with the Forestry Department of The University of 
THE South. Forestry students gain first-hand knowledge of forest re- 
search and participate in helping establish forest projects on the Uni- 
versity research forest. Technical forest research personnel are avail- 
able at all times to help the student with his forest problems. 

Work at the Sewanee forest management project emphasizes (i) 
soil-site relationships for pines and hardwoods, and (2) artificial re- 
generation of hardwoods. 

A new silviculture laboratory containing 7,000 square feet and pro- 
viding offices, shop, and laboratory space for 18 people is now under 
construction. The laboratory section has rooms for general silviculture 
research, soil preparation and analysis, seed germination, and small 
mammal investigations. There will also be walk-in storage facilities for 
tree seed and seedHngs. 

The major experimental areas are the 8,000-acre domain at The 
University of the South and the 2,600-acre Flat Top Experimental 
Forest near Birmingham. Studies are installed on industry lands, 
state and national forests, and other public lands in central Tennessee 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 8 1 

and north Alabama. Sewanee research should benefit related highland 
regions throughout the South. 

101. Dendrology. 

A detailed study of the principal commercial forest trees of the United States, 
including tree ranges, principal uses, silvlcal requirements, and major identifying 
features. Identification of the trees and native shrubs in the vicinity of the campus. 
Lectures, two hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite: Biology 101-102. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Smith. 

201-202. Wood Utilization. 

The first semester is devoted to the study of gross and minute struttural character- 
istics of domestic woods of commercial importance. The second semester is devoted 
to a survey of methods and equipment employed in the primary and secondary 
manufacture of forest products. Offered in alternate years. Lectures, three hours; 
laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours each semester). Mr. Baird. 

301. Forest Fire Control and Use. 

Principles of fire behavior and effects. Prevention and control of forest fires. Use 
of fire in forest land management. Offered in alternate years. (Credit, three hours). 
Mr. Smith. 

302. Forest Entomology. 

Fundamentals of morphology, physiology, and ecology of forest insects. Survey of 
the more important forest shade tree and wood product insect pests of North America 
with fundamentals of their control. Generally offered In alternate years. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Smith. 

303-304. Forest Mensuration. 

Principles, methods, and instruments employed in surveying forest land and In 
measuring the content and growth of individual trees and of forest stands. Includes 
an introduction to forest aerial photogrammetry and a timber cruise leading to the 
preparation of a forest management plan. Lectures, three hours; laboratory, three 
hours. Prerequisites: Forestry loi, Civil Engineering 102, and Mathematics 101-104. 
(Credit, four hours each semester). Mr. Baird. 

305-306. Silviculture. 

Interrelationship of environmental factors and forest vegetation with emphasis on 
tree physiology; the fundamentals of soil science; theories and techniques of applymg 
ecological knowledge to the control of establishment, composition, and growth of forests. 
Laboratory and field work on the University Domain. (Credit, four hours each 
semester). Mr. Simlth. 

401. Forest Management. 

The application of business methods and technical forestry principles to the opera- 
tion of a forestry property. Prerequisites: Civil Engineering 102 and Forestry 201. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Cheston. 



82 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH j 

( 
402. Forest Valuation. ! 

Economic analysis of forestry activities. Appraisal and valuation of forest land and ] 
stumpage. Prerequisite: Forestry 401. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Cheston. 

403-404. Forestry Seminar. j 

A study of topics not covered in the general forestry courses offered. Designed to \ 
acquaint students with the entire field of forestry and to allow them an opportunity 
for researth into forest subjects of special interest. (Credit, one hour each semester). 
Staff. ; 

405. Forest Economics. 

Principles of economics applied to the management of forest land and to the 

production, distribution, and consumption of forest products. Prerequisites: Economics 

loi or the consent of the instruttor. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Baird. ; 

406. Economics of Conservation. 

Renewable and non-renewable natural resources with particular emphasis on economic 
aspects. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Cheston. 



FRENCH 

Professor Buck 

Associate Professor Bates 

Assistant Professor Jones 

Mr. McNab 

Mr. McCrady 

A major shall consist of not less than twenty-four hours selected 
from courses numbered 300 or higher. 

101-102. Elementary French. 

The phonology and basic structure of the French language. (Credit, six hours). 
Staff. 

201-202. Intermediate French. 

Intensive and extensive reading of modern texts. Continued drill in pronunciation 
and oral expression. Prerequisite: French 102 or two years of French in secondary 
school. (Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

301-302. An Introduction to French Literature. 

A study of representative masterpieces from the Chanson de Roland to the 
present. Prerequisite: French 202 or equivalent. (Credit, three hours each semester). 
Staff. 

311-312. Composition and Conversation. 

Intensive exeitises in the use of written and oral French. Reading and discussion 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 83 

of contemporary texts. Prerequisite: French 202 or equivalent. (Credit, three hours 
each semester). Mr. McCrady. 

401. The Seventeenth Century. 

Authors of the age of Henri IV and Richelieu, with emphasis on baroque poefts, 
Corneille, Descartes, and Pascal. Fall, 1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Jones. 

402. The Seventeenth Century. 

A study of the classical authors of the age of Louis XIV, with emphasis on 
Moliere, La Fontame, and Racine. Sprmg, 1967 and alternate years. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Jones. 

403. The Eighteenth Century. 

A study of the literature of the period of the Enlightenment, with emphasis on the 
thought of Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. Fall, 1968 and alter- 
nate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Jones. 

405. The Romantic Movement. 

A study of the major authors, with emphasis on Chateaubriand, Lamartlne, de VIgny, 
Hugo, and Musset. Readmgs, lectures, reports. Fall, 1967 and alternate years. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Buck. 

406. The Realistic Novel. 

The fiction of Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, and Zola. Readings, lectures, reports. 
Spring, 1968 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Buck. 

407. The Late Nineteenth Century. 

The authors of the second half of the century, with emphasis on Letonte de Lisle 
and Baudelaire. Fall, 1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Buck. 

408. Contemporary Literature. 

The novel, poetry, and drama of the twentieth century. Readings, lectures, re- 
ports. Sprmg, 1968. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Bates. 

409. The Renaissance. 

A study of the major authors, with emphasis on Rabelais, the Plelade poetis, and 
Montaigne. Readings, lectures, and short papers. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Jones. 

435-436. Senior Tutorial. 

Special Topics. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. (Credit, three hours each 
semester) . Staff. 



84 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

GERMAN 

Professor Whitesell 
Assistant Professor Lockard 

The minimum requirement for majors in German is 30 credit hours, 
including 311-312 and 405-406; those planning to continue the German 
major in graduate school should take 36 hours in the Department. 

101-102. Beginning German. 

Grammar and easy reading; considerable emphasis Is placed upon pronunciation and 
elementary conversation through the practice techniques of the language laboratory. 
In the second semester the study of grammar Is 'continued, but special attention is 
given to rapid and exact reading of German texts. (Credit, six hours). Mr. Lockard. 

201-202. Intermediate German. 

Representative pieces of prose fiction are read and discussed. The primary 
emphasis is placed upon the exact understanding of the German text. In the second 
semester a modern German novel and a piece of classical epic or dramatic poetry 
are read. Prerequisite: German 1 01-102 or placement test with a satisfactory grade. 
(Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

301-302. Advanced Readings. 

Selected stories by Storm, Keller, Meyer, and Stifter are read and discussed. In 
course 302 one work each of Goethe and Schiller Is read plus a modem novel. (Credit, 
three hours each semester). Mr. Whitesell. 

311-312. Intermediate German Conversation and Composition. 

Intensive conversational exercises and drill In colloquial Idioms. Grammar review. 
Regular practice in composition at the Intermediate level; part of the work In the 
second semester is based on current periodicals. The course Is conducted In German 
and is required of majors. Prerequisite: German 201-202. (With permission of 
instructor may be taken Concurrently with 201-202). (Credit, three hours each 
semester). Mr. Lockard. 

401-402. Goethe's Life and Work. 

Faust, Werther, Iphigenie, and Hermann und Dorothea are read entire In class. 
Each semester one other major work of Goethe Is assigned for outside reading. Pre- 
requisite: German 301-302 or consent of Instructor. (Credit, three hours each semester). 
Given 1966-1967 and alternate years. Mr. Whitesell. 

403-404. Schiller's Life and Work. 

Die Rauber, Kabale und Lie be, and Don Carlos, together with the early poetry, 
are read in the first semester. Wallenstein, Maria Stuart, Wilhelm Tell, and the 
later poetry are studied In the second. 1966-1967 and alternate years. (Credit, three 
hours each semester). Mr. Lockard. 

405-406. Survey of German Literature. 

The history of German literature is studied from the beginnings down to the 
present day. Required of all majors. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. 
Whitesell. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 8$ 

HISTORY 

Professor Grimes 

Professor Webb 

Assistant Professor Campbell 

Dr. Read 

Dr. Goodstein 

Mr. Hoover 

Students planning to major in History are urgently advised to take 
such courses as will satisfy the basic College requirements for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree during the Freshman and Sophomore years. 
Those planning to continue their study of History in graduate school 
are advised to select French or German as their language. The mini- 
mum requirement in addition to History 101-102 for any student ma- 
joring in the Department is eight semester courses and History 351- 
352. 

The comprehensive examination is a written examination which may 
be supplemented by an oral examination for those students who are 
candidates for honors in History. 

101-102. An Introductory History of Europe. 

Designed to introduce the student to the problems of modem civilization and to 
provide a background for courses in Economics and Political Science as well as in 
History. (Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

105-106. Advanced European Survey. 

A survey of the history of European Civilization, offered to selected freshman stu- 
dents. 1965-1966 only. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mrs. Goodstein. 

201-202. History of the United States. 

A general survey of the political, constitutional, economic, and social history of 
the United States. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Webb. 

205-206. History of England. 

A general survey of the political, constitutional, economic, and social history of 
England and the British Empire since the Anglo-Saxon Conquest. (Credit, three 
hours each semester). Mr. Campbell. 

207-208. Russian History. 

An Introduction to major developments In Russian social and political life from the 
Klevan state to the present. Particular attention is given to the element of continuity 
and change between Czarist Russia and the present Soviet state. (Credit, three 
hours each semester). Mr. Read. 



86 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

301-302. Ancient History. 

The history of the ancient world from pre-historic times through the third 
century A.D. 1966-1967 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours each semester). 
Mr. Grimes. 

303-304. Medieval History, 300-1300. 

The history of medieval Europe from the fourth to the fourteenth century, with 
special emphasis on social, economic, and religious developments. 1965-1966 and 
alternate years. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Grimes. 

305. The Renaissance and Reformation. 

The history of Europe during the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries, with 
special emphasis on the Renaissance in Italy and in northern Europe, the Protestant 
Revolt, and the Catholic Reform. 1 966-1 967 and alttemate years. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Grimes. 

306. The Reformation Era. 

The history of Europe from Luther's revolt to the Peace of Westphalia, with 
special attention to the interaction of religion and society. (Credit, three hours). 
Mr. Grimes. 

307. Europe in the Seventeenth Century. 

The history of Europe (excluding the British Isles) from 1600 to 171 5, emphasiz- 
ing the religious wars, mercantilism, absolutism, the growth of the European states 
system, and the rise of modem science. 1966-1967 and alternate years. (Credit, three 
hours). 

308. The Revolutionary Era. 

A history of Europe in the eighteenth century, with particular attention to what 
is sometimes called "The Age of Democratic Revolutions" (1760-1800) and to the 
Frenth Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Read. 

309. Modern Europe, 1815-1914. 

A study of the internal development of the principal states, the problem arising 
from the Industrial Revolution, nationalism, and imperialism, and the origins of World 
War I. (Credit, three hours). 

311. Recent and Contemporary Europe. 

Modem Europe since 1914: the internal development of the principal states, the 
Ideological conflict, economic nationalism, and the search for a system of collective 
security. (Credit, three hours). 

313-314. British Empire and Commonwealth. 

The history of the first and second British Empires, with particular attention to 
the commonwealth and the historical development of Canada, India, Australia, New 
Zealand, and South Africa. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Campbell. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 87 

321. American Economic History. 

An historical study of how American economic growth has occurred, in terms of 
the processes, institutions, and ideas involved. Coverage extends from colonial times 
to the present. Also listed as Economics 321. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Goodstein. 

324. Colonial and Revolutionary America. 

The development of institutions and Ideas in colonial society. (Credit, three hours.) 
Mrs. Goodstein. 

325. The American West. 

A study of the development of the American West and of the concept of the West 
in American thought. (Credit, three hours). Mrs. Goodstein. 

327. History of the South. 

A study of Southern nationalism from the War of 181 2 to the First World War, 
with special emphasis on political, economic, and cultural factors. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Webb. 

328. The United States in the Twentieth Century. 

A study In the political, sdclal, and cultural response of American democracy to the 
problems of urbanism and industrialism at home and to the responsibilities of world 
conflict abroad. 1965-1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Webb. 

331. Diplomatic History of the United States. 

A survey of the diplomatic history of the United States from the American Revo- 
lution to the present, with special emphasis upon the historical evolution of American- 
foreign policy in the 20th Century. 1966-1967 and alternate years. (Credit, three 
hours). Mr. Webb. 

337. Seventeenth Century England. 

The political, social, and intellectual history of England from 1603 to 1714. Pre- 
requisite: History 205-206. 1965-1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). 

338-339. Problems in History. 

Advanced courses open to Juniors and Seniors only. Emphasis is placed upon 
individual work in consultation with the instructor. (Credit, three hours each semester).. 
Staff. 

351-352. Introduction to the Study of History. 

An Introduction to the methods and techniques of historical writing and research. 
Interpretations of modem historical writing. Required of all junior majors. (Credit^ 
one hour each semester). Mr. Campbell and staff. 

361-362. Intellectual and Social History of the United States. 

Selected problems in the development of American ideas and social structures, 
1800^1960. Emphasis is placed on mdlvidual reports and class discussion. (Credit,, 
three hours each semester). Mrs. Goodstein. 



88 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

451-452. Senior Tutorial. 

The course is designed to acquaint the student with the major historians and his- 
torical philosophies through mdividual reading under the direction of the instructor. 
(Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Grimes. 



MATHEMATICS 

Associate Professor Puckette 

Professor Bruton 

Associate Professor Cross 

Associate Professor McLeod 

Dr. Alvarez 

The mathematics requirement can be satisfied by any two three-hour 
semester courses. 

Unless otherwise indicated, all courses meet three hours a week and 
give three hours credit each semester. 

101. Introductory Calculus. 

The basic freshman course. Staff. 

104. Finite Mathematics. 

The study of finite sets and their relation to symbolic logic, vectors, matrices, and 
probability theory. Staff. 

151-152-251. Calculus and Analytic Geometry. 

A combined course for selected freshmen. It includes a thorough treatment of 
calculus, with the omission of functions of several variables. Staff. 

201-202 Calculus. 

A more compact course for sophomores and advanced placement freshmen. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics loi or its equivalent. Staff. 

252. Linear Algebra. 

An introductory study of linear transformations and matrices with applications. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 201 or 251 or permission of Instructor. Mr. Alvarez. 

301-302. Advanced Calculus. 

A continuation of calculus, with emphasis on functions of several variables. 
Normally required of all majors In mathematics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 252, or 
permission of instructor. Mr. Alvarez. 

303. Theory of Numbers. 

An introduction to the integers. Includes the standard number-theoretic functions, 



I 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 09 

properties of the primes, analysis of congruences, quadratic residues, contmued frac- 
tions, DIophantlne analysis, and twenty-three unsolved problems. Mr. Cross. 

305. Modern Algebra. 

A study of the standard algebraic structures: groups, rings and ideals, fields, and 
integral domains. Normally required of all majors. Mr. Cross. 

306. Topology. 

A discussion of general topology, Includmg non-metric spaces. Notions of compact- 
ness, connectedness, local compactness and connectedness, with emphasis on applica- 
tions to analysis. Prerequisite: Mathematics 305, or permission of Instructor. Mr. 
Cross. 

312. Differential Equations. 

Properties of solutions of ordinary differential equations, introduction to partial 
differential equations, and applications to physical problems. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 301, or permission of instructor. Mr. McLeod. 

313. Theory of Games. 

Discrete and tontlnuous two-person zero-sum games, and an Introduction to discrete 
n-person games. Mr. McLeod. 

321. Probability and Statistics. 

A treatment of probability and a logical development of the framework of mathe- 
matical statistics. It Includes sampling, estimation of parameters, hypothesis testing, 
and confidence methods. Prerequisite: Calculus. 

351. Elements of Numerical Analysis. 

Same as Computer Science 351. A course oriented toward the digital computer. 
Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite: a year of Calculus. (Credit, 
two hours). Messrs. Penland and Puckette. 

403-404. Honors Seminar. 

Selected topics. 

405-406. Senior Tutorial. 

Independent study in a selected topic. 

409. Mathematical Logic. 

Same as Philosophy 409. Mr. Caldwell. 

411. Functions o| a Complex Variable. 

An Introduction to analytic functions, Including the elementary functions In the 
complex plane, Cauchy's integral formula, Taylor and Laurent series, the residue 
theorem, conformal mapping, and analytic continuation. Applications to elementary 
mathematics and physical problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 302. Mr. McLeod. 

412. Functions of a Real Variable. 

Set theory, metric spaces, the RIemann-Stieltjes integral, preservation of properties 



90 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

under convergence, the Stone-Welerstrass theorem, and harmonic analysis. Includes 
an introduction to measure theory and the Lebesgue integral through the Riesz-Fischer 
theorem. Mr. Alvarez. 

415-416. Topics in Geometry. 

In 1965-66, this Included linear geometry, differential geometry, and problems In 
convexity. Prerequisite: Mathematics 305. Mr. Puckette. 



MUSIC 

Assistant Professor Running 
Assistant Professor McCrory 

101-102. Music Fundamentals. 

A basic study of the art of reading music, learning to follow a printed score. A 
study of the signs and symbols of music to understand the basic patterns of rhythm 
and meter. Two hours a week. Music loi Is prerequisite for Music 102. (Credit, 
two hours each semester). Miss McCrory. 

201-202. Appreciation of Music. 

Designed to assist the student to listen to music appreciatively and Intelligently and 
to familiarize him with the works of the great composers. Prerequisite 101-102 or 
the equivalent musical background. Music 201 is prerequisite to 202. One hour a 
week. (Credit, one hour each semester). Miss McCrory. 

211-212. Music Literature of the Classic Period. 

A detailed study of the literature of the period, with the greatest emphasis on the 
music of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven, One hour a week. (Credit, one hour each 
semester). Mr. Running. 

301-302. History of Music. 

A systematic survey of the course of musical history from the days of plainsong 
through the rise of the polyphonic, 'classic, and romantic schools to the present day. 
Music 301 Is prerequisite to 302. Three hours a week. (Credit, three hours each se- 
mester). Miss McCrory. 

401-402. Music Theory. 

A study of keyboard harmony, musical dictation, and basic harmony. Prerequisite: 
Music 101-102, or profi'ciency on an instrument. Three hours a week. (Credit, 
three hours each semester). Mr. Running. 

411-412. Introduction to Church Music. 

Historical background of the relationship of music to the Liturgy; hymnology and 
the use of music in the contemporary church. One hour a week. (Credit, one hour 
each semester). Mr. Running. 



Note: Membership In the University Choir and Band Is open to all qualified stu- 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 9I 

dents by audition. Membership in the Choir or Band gives one hour of academic 
credit each semester; but credit may not be earned in both concurrently, and not 
more than four hours of credit may be granted in either or in a tombination of the 
two. Private instruction in voice, organ, piano, and some instruments is available 
upon request of the student. 



PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Marshall 

Associate Professor Caldwell 

Dr. Sallis 

The year-course requirero.ent of Philosophy or Religion may be met 
by taking any two semester courses in the Department of Philosophy. 

All courses in the Department count towards the major in Philoso- 
phy, and students majoring must take at least 27 hours in the Depart- 
ment. Students planning to do graduate work in Philosophy are ex- 
pected to take additional courses in the Department including General 
Logic. The comprehensive examination is both written ajnd oral and 
is taken in fields chosen by the student in consultation with the Chair- 
man of the Department. 

101-102. Introduction to Western Thought. 

An introduction to philosophy through the reading of a selected number of philo- 
sophical classics. Open only to Freshmen and Sophomores. (Credit, three hours 
each semester). Staff. 

201. Plato. 

A study of Plato's dialogues, with emphasis on his influence in creating modern 
thought. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

202. Aristotle. 

A study of representative works written by Aristotle and of Aristotle's influence on 
Western civilization. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

203. Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy. 

The philosophical significance of certain fundamental developments In modern 
mathematics such as non-Euclidean geometries, projective geometry, theory of groups, 
the real number system, set theory, and transfinite arithmetic. No special mathe- 
matical knowledge required as a prerequisite. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Caldwell. 

204. General Logic. 

An introduction to the prmciples of valid reasoning. (Credit, three hours). Mr. 
Caldwell. 



92 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

300. Philosophy of Science. 

An investigation of the prmciples of the natural sciences. Methodology, the role 
of mathematics and logic, hypotheses, verification, concept formation, theory construc- 
tion, scientific explanation, the relation of science to other areas of knowledge. Pre- 
requisite: Physics loi and 102. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Caldwell. 

301. Existentialism. 

A survey of Existentialism as a philosophical movement conducted through a study 
of its origin in the writings of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche and of its contemporary 
forms in the writings of such philosophers as Heidegger and Sartre. Prerequisite: 
six semester hours of philosophy or consent of the instructor. (Credit, three hours). 
Mr. Sallis. 

302. Phenomenology. 

A study of the origin of phenomenology in the thought of Husserl and its de- 
velopment in the writings of such philosophers as Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty. 
Some attention will be given to current phenomenological research on such topics as 
language, art, and the social sciences. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Sallis. 

303. Philosophy of Law. 

The law considered from the standpoint of philosophical ideas embedded withm 
it. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

305. Aesthetics. 

Aesthetic theory considered primarily in terms of Aristotelianism and Neo-Platonlsm. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

306. Contemporary Philosophy. 

A study of the major philosophical movements of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: 
Philosophy 101-102 or 307-308. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Caldwell. 

307-308. History of PhEosophy. 

Philosophy from the Milesians to modern times, augmented by the use of source 
material. (Credit, three hours each semester). Staff. 

310. Kant and German Idealism. 

A study of the origin and development of classical German thought. Extensive 
reading in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, followed by a study of the development 
of Kantian thought in the works of such philosophers as Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel. 
Prerequisite: six semester hours of philosophy or consent of the instructor. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Sallis. 

314. The Philosophy of Whitehead. 

Alfred North Whitehead's philosophy studied in its relations to modern thought. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Caldwell. 

400. Cosmology. 

A general investigation of the problem of order. Emphasis is placed upon the 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 93 

metaphysical, epistemological, and axlological principles underlying the cosmological 
systems of Democritus, Plato, Aristotle, Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Newton, Einstein, 
and Whitehead. Recent discoveries in the foundations of mathematics and natural 
science and their relevance to a synthesis of conflictmg principles of order. Prerequisite: 
six semester hours of philosophy or consent of the instructor. (Credit, three hours). 
Mr. Caldwell. 

401. Ethics. 

Ethics investigated through selected problems. Papers are read and criticized in 
class. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

402. Philosophy of Religion. 

Philosophy of religion investigated through selected problems. Papers are read and 
criticized in class. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

403. Epistemology. 

Epistemology investigated by the examination of typical systems of the theory of 
knowledge. Papers are read and criticized in class. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Mar- 
shall. 

404. Metaphysics. 

Metaphysics investigated by the examination of certain contemporary problems. 
Papers are read and criticized in class. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Marshall. 

405-406. History of Philosophy in the 17th and 18th Centuries. 

The History of Philosophy considered in terms of selected philosophers. Papers are 
read and criticized in class. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Marshall. 

407-408. The Thought of St. Thomas Aquinas. 

The philosophy of Thomas Aquinas studied in the text and through his commenta- 
tors. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Marshall. 

409. Mathematical Logic. 

Propositional logic, predicate logic, set theory, the Frege-Russell-Whitehead logistic 
thesis, introduction to the foundations of mathematics. Prerequisite: differential 
and Integral calculus or consent of the instructor. Also listed as Mathematics 409. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Caldwell. 

411-412. Senior Tutorial. 

Individual study, with tutorial instruction. (Credit, three hours each semester). 
Staff. 



94 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Mr. Bryant 
Mr. Bitondo 
Mr. Majors 
Mr. Varnell 
Mr. Moore 
Mr. Carter 
Mr. Warden 

All students must receive credit for four semesters of satisfactory 
work in Physical Education. The Director of Physical Education shall 
determine whether or not a student's work is satisfactory. A minimum 
swimming requirement must be met by all students. Exceptions: (i) 
students who are excused from physical activity by a physician, (2) 
students who are military veterans, (3) students in the Air Force 
ROTC unit, and (4) students excused by the Dean of the College. 

Until he has completed this requirement, each student must attend 
two scheduled periods each week of one hour in length. (Academic 
credit of one hour per semester is given for satisfactory work; maxi- 
mum credit, four hours.) 

Among the objectives of this program are: 

1. To develop an enthusiasm for playing some game well so that it 
may be enjoyed both in college and in later life. 

2. To develop agility and coordination of mind, eye, and body. 

3. To develop the ability to swim. 

4. To grow in understanding and develop skills in maintaining 
physical fitness for daily living. 

The Director of Physical Education will offer instruction in various 
activities throughout the year. This is governed by the interest and 
need expressed by the students. Skills have been taught in the follow- 
ing sports: basketball, bowling, beginning swimming, golf, gymnastics, 
handball, swimming instructors' course, judo, karati, lifesaving, tennis, 
volleyball, weight lifting, and wrestling. 

The intramural program offers competition in: touch football, cross 
country, volleyball, basketball, handball, wrestling, badminton, track, 
Softball, tennis, golf, and swimming. 

Schedules are conducted in the following varsity sports: football, 
basketball, cross country, wrestling, swimming, baseball, tennis, golf, 
and track. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 95 

PHYSICS 

Dr. Ellis 

Dr. Rush 

Mr. Penland 

Physics I0I-I02 is basic to all other courses in the Department. A 
major consists of at least eight semester lecture courses and one ad- 
vanced laboratory course, with Chemistry 101-102 and Mathematics 
301-302. Students planning to do graduate work in Physics or Engi- 
neering are expected to take additional courses in Mathematics. 

A student electing a major in Physics should take Mathematics 
201-202 or their equivalent a;s soon as possible, as these courses are pre- 
requisites for Physics courses numbered 300 and above. 

101-102. General Physics. 
Physixjs 101. 

Mechanics, heat, wave motion, and sound. Lectures, two hours; recitations, two 
hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours). Staff. 

Physics 102. 

Electricity, magnetism, optics, and modem physics. Lectures, two hours; recitations, 
two hours; laboratory, three hours. Prerequisite: Physics loi. (Credit, four hours). 
Staff. 

103-104. Introductory Physics. 

An Introduction to concepts, methods, and theories in physics for students not in- 
tending to major in the physical sciences or mathematics. Lectures, two hours; 
recitations, two hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, four hours each semester). 
Staff. 

203. Optics. 

A study of the fundamental principles of geometrical and physical optics. Fall, 
1966-1967 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Ellis. 

205-206. Intermediate Laboratory. 

This course affords an opportunity for further training and experimental study in 
physics. Laboratory, three hours. 1966-1967 and alternate years. (Credit, one 
hour each semester). Staff. 

207. Fundamentals of Electronics. 

Fall, 1966-1967. (With laboratory; credit, four hours). Staff. 

301. Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism. 

Prerequisite: Physics 102, Mathematics 202. Required of majors. Fall, 1965-1966 
and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Rush. 



96 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

302. Electromagnetic Theory. 

Prerequisite: Physics 301. Required of majors. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Rush, 

303. Intermediate Mechanics. 

Spring, 1965-1966 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Staff. 

305-306. Advanced Laboratory. 

1966-1967 and ahernate years. Laboratory, three hours. (Credit, one hour each 
semester) . Staff. 

307. Introduction to Modem Physics. 

An introduction to the atomic nature of matter, radiation, atomic and nuclear 
structure, relativity, and elementary particles. Prerequisite: Physics 101-102 or 103- 
104; Corequisite: A course in calculus. Fall, 1965-1966 and alternate years. (Credit, 
three hours). Staff. 

308. Nuclear Physics. 

Systematics of nuclear structure, nuclear models, nuclear reactions, elementary 
particle symmetries and reactions, and introduction to quantum mechanics. Pre- 
requisite: Physics 307. (Credit, three hours). Staff. 

310. Thermodynamics. 

A study of the first and second laws of thermodynamics, with applications, and an 
introduction to statistical mechanics and kinetic theory. Sprmg, 1966-1967 and 
alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Ellis. 

401. Theoretical Mechanics. 

Moving coordinate systems, rigid body dynamics, Lagrangian mechanics, variational 
principles, and relativistic mechanics. Prerequisite: Physics 303. Corequisite: 
Mathematics 301. Fall, 1966-1967 and alternate years. (Credit, three hours). Staff, 

404. Quantum Mechanics. 

An introduction to the fundamental principles of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, 
with applications in atomic and nuclear physics. Prerequisites: Physics 301, 302, 
303? 307? and Mathematics 302. Fall. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Rush. 

405-406. Senior Laboratory. 

(Credit, one hour each semester). Staff. 

407. Seminar. 

Spring. All seniors must participate. Additional work may be elected with one 
of the staff. Open to juniors with permission of the department. Credit to be de- 
termined by the staff. 

Data Processing. 

161. Fundamentals of Computer Programming. 

A three-hour laboratory introducing basic computer languages which the student 



I 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 97 

learns through operation of the IBM 1620 Digital Computer. Prerequisite: Freshman 
mathematics. (Credit, one hour). Mr. Penland. 

351. Elements of Numerical Analysis. 

A course In numerical methods which Involves one hour of lecture and a three-hour 
laboratory. Prerequisite: One year of calculus. (Credit, two hours). Mr. Puckette 
and Mr. Penland. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Dugan 

*Professor Lancaster 

Associate Professor Gilchrist 

Assistant Professor Keele 

Students fulfilling the social science requirement by taking courses in 
the Department of Political Science are advised that any two semester- 
courses lare accepted as fulfilling this requirement, and that any one 
semester-course in Political Science in combination with Economics loi 
will likewise fulfill this requirement. 

Students majoring in the Department of Political Science will nor- 
mally be expected to complete, by the end of the junior year, courses 
in American Government, Foreign Governments, International Rela- 
tions (any one semester-course), and Public Law (lany one semester- 
course). All students majoring in the Department are required to take 
the Graduate Record Examination as part of their written comprehen- 
sive examination. The written comprehensive examination (in addi- 
tion to the Graduate Record Examination) consists of two parts. Part 
I deals with Political Institutions in Theory and Practice and is re- 
quired of all majors. For Part II a candidate may take either a paper 
on Public Law and Jurisprudence or a paper on International Relations 
in Theory and Practice. 

Comprehensive oral examinations will include major courses, other 
courses, materials of the written comprehensive examination, and the 
bibliography of Political Science, including contributions of leading 
scholars in the field. Certain students not candidates for honors and 
certain students whose standing is clear as the result of all parts of the 
written comprehensive examination may, entirely at the discretion of 



*0n leave I96s-I9€6. 



98 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

the Department, not be required to take comprehensive oral examina- 
tions. 

In accordance with college regulations, a student majoring In the 
Department may take a maximum of 42 hours. 

Students majoring in the Department who intend to study law are 
strongly urged to take the Law School Admissions Test and to take 
courses in English History and Economics as soon as possible. 

101. American Government and Politics. 

A study of government and politics at all levels in the United States. (Credit, 
three hours). Staff. 

102. Modern Foreign Governments. 

The governments of England, Canada, France, Germany, Russia, and such other 

states as the instructor may include In the course. (Credit, three hours). Staff. 

\ 
104. State and Local Government. 

A critical exammation of politics and the operation of government at the state, 
county, and city levels in the United States, (Credit, three hours). Mr. Keele. 

206. English Constitutional Development. 

A study of the origins of the English constitution and of Its subsequent develop- 
ment, including the political and legal theory which accompanied this development. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Kede. 

207. Political Parties and Pressure Groups. 

The history, organization, and functions of political parties: the activities and im- 
portance of pressure groups and propaganda; the relationship between economic 
power and politics. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Gilchrist. 

213. Business Law. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the principles of business law; an 
approach to the law of contracts, bailments, negotiable Instruments, common tarriers, 
insurance, sales, wills; a study of the nature of legal remedies; information on how 
and when to seek legal advice. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Lancaster. 

221-222. History of European Diplomacy. 

A diplomatic history of Europe and the world, with emphasis on the period since 
1814. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Dugan. 

225. Latin America. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Lancaster. 

301. History of Political Theory. 

The development of political thought In the West, with emphasis on the period 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 99 

since the sixteenth century. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Gilchrist. 

302. Recent Political Theory. 

A contmuation of Political Science 301, with emphasis on late nineteenth and 
twentieth century thought m Europe and America; the relationship between sociology 
and politics, and the relationship between ethics and politics. (Credit, three hours). 
Mr. Gilchrist. 

304. American Political Thought. 

American political theory considered historically and in its relationships with 
American history, American constitutional development, and American legal theory. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Keele. 

305-306. American Constitutional Development. 

The colonial background of the American Constitution; the forces that influenced its 
framing; its development by formal amendment, statutory elaboration, judicial in- 
terpretation, and change in usage; the American adaptation of English common law 
and equity. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Keele. 

308. The Legislative Process. 

The composition, organization, procedure, and powers of legislative bodies in the 
United States and abroad; the study of standard classical works on the nature of 
legislation, such as those of Bentham; a consideration of modern theories concerning 
the nature and function of legislation. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Gilchrist. 

321. Introduction to International Politics. 

The European states system, and its worldwide extension; the balance of power, 
diplomacy, international institutions; the importance of geography in international 
politics; the historical background of the world power conflict of today. (Credit, 
three hours). Mr. Dugan. 

322. American Foreign Policies. 

The conduct of foreign relations under the American constitutional and political 
system. The main lines of American interests in various areas, with emphasis on 
Latin America. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Dugan. 

323. The Middle East In World Politics. 

(Credit, three hours). Mr. Dugan. 

324. The Far East in World Politics. 

The Far East as an area of international conflict, with emphasis on the period 
since the building of the Trans-Siberian Railway. The interests and policies of the 
powers in the Far East, and the relationship between the Far East and other areas 
of international conflict. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Dugan. 

351-352. Principles of Political Science. 

A course in the general principles of the subject, intended primarily for junior 
majors. (Credit, one hour each semester). Staff. 



100 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

401. Political Science and Government. 

A comparative study of modem constitutions and of the main branches of government 
and main forces in politics in the modern world. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Dugan. 

405. The Constitution of the United States. 

The Constitution in law and custom, especially as it has developed since 1937. 
(Credit, three hours). Mr. Keele and Mr. Lancaster. 

406. Jurisprudence. 

Historical and analytical jurisprudence, with emphasis on the systems of England 
and America; a brief study of the philosophical, comparative, and sociological schools 
of jurisprudence; the judicial process. (Credit, three hours). Mr. Lancaster. 

421-422. International Law and Organization. 

The sources, subjects, and major principles of international law; the function of 
law in the international community; the League of Nations, the ideas underlying it, 
and its effect on international society; the United Nations Organization, and its limi- 
tations. (Credit, three hours ea'ch semester). Mr. Lancaster. 

451-452. Tutorial. 

A course for specially selected senior majors and other specially selected senior 
students. (Credit, three hours each semester). Mr. Dugan and others. 



PSYCHOLOGY 
Professor Lundin 

Psychology 201-202 Is the basic required course for all advanced 
work in the department. Those students wishing to major in the De- 
partment of Psychology must take the following courses in addition to 
their work in the department: Biology 101-102, Mathematics 101-102. 
Philosophy 307-308 is highly recommended. For those students wish- 
ing to prepare for graduate work in experimental psychology, Physics 
101-102 is strongly recommended. Most graduate schools in psychology 
require a reading knowledge of both French and German for the Ph.D. 
In some cases Russian may be substituted for one of the above. 

201-202. Principles of Psychology. 

A survey of the facts and principles derived from the scientific study of behavior, 
both human and infra-human. Theoretical and experimental findings in the fields of 
learning, motivation, emotions, perception, and individual differences are considered- 
201 prerequisite for 202. (Credit, three hours each semester). 

301. Personality Theories. 

Contemporary theories of personality are examined with reference to their structure, 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES lOI 

dynamics, and development. Major emphasis Is placed on the psychoanalytic theories 
of Freud, Jung, and Adler. (Credit, three hours). 

302. Abnormal Behavior. 

A study of the principles of psychopathology. Behavioral disturbances are ex- 
ammed in the light of their psychological, biological, and cultural determinants and 
their relations to normal behavior. (Credit, three hours). 

303. Social Psychology. 

The behavior of individuals within groups, the interaction of groups, and the effect 
of groups on individual responding. The effect of society and cultural institutions 
on group and individual responding. Not offered 1966-1967. (Credit, three hours). 

304. Tests and Measurements. 

A study of the variability of normal behavior as Indicated by various psychological 
measurements. A discussion of the methods of test construction and their use, as 
well as some practice in test administration and interpretation. (Credit, three hours). 

321. Quantitative Methods in Psychology. 

Designed to introduce the students to the methodology of experimental Investigation: 
various kinds of experimental design and data treatment. (Credit, three hours). 

351-352. The Experimental Analysis of Behavior. 

Individual experiments planned to demonstrate basic psychological principles in the 
areas of conditioning, human learning, forgetting, transfer of training, sensation, per- 
ception, and motivation. (Credit, three hours each semester). 

401. Contemporary Theories and Systems of Psychology. 

The development of psychological theorizing from the late nineteenth century to 
the present day viewed in the light of its historical antecedents. The major psycho- 
logical systems of Behaviorism, Structuralism, Functlonalism, and Gestalt psy- 
chology are examined as well as some modern learning theory. Prerequisite: Phi- 
losophy 307-308 and one year of psychology beyond the introductory level. Offered 
1966-1967. (Credit, three hours). 

451-452. Senior Tutorial. 

Independent study of an experimental nature. The student will design and execute 
some kind of psychological experiment. For specially selected senior major students. 
(Credit, three hours). 



102 THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 
Mr. Robertson 

The College provides a laboratory course in speech, meeting in one 
two-hour session each week: exercise in diction and articulation; prac- 
tice in the delivery of extempore and prepared speeches. (Credit, one 
hour each semester). 



RELIGION 

Associate Professor Brettmann 
Associate Professor Collins 

Mr. Wentz ^ 

In addition to the courses listed below, qualified upperclassmen may 
take courses in the School of Theology for credit in the College, with 
permission of the head of the department. Credits earned in this way 
will not count toward a degree in the School of Theology. Students in 
the School of Theology may take the advanced courses listed below. 

101-102. The English Bible. 

A survey of the whole Bible in historical outlme. First semester, the Old Testament; 
second semester, the New Testament. Open to freshmen and sophomores only. (Credit, 
three hours each semester). Mr. Brettmann and Mr. Collms. 

201-202. Biblical Thought. 

The distinctive ideas of the Bible traced in their historical development through